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Thread: What tasks intimidate you

  1. #1
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    What tasks intimidate you

    I read lots of questions about tasks in woodworking. Recently one about mortise or tenon first. What is your biggest fear. Not the arts sort type things like carving but just general tasks. Is it curves, angles, sawing to the line, planing to the line, marking out, etc? For instance, If you cut five mortises and five tenons to fit and the dog ate your mortised piece would you put it all aside or just make a new mortise piece?
    Jim

  2. #2
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    Filing a square to tolerance.
    *** "I have gained insights from many sources... experts, tradesman & novices.... no one has a monopoly on good ideas." Jim Dailey, SMC, Feb. 19, 2007
    *** "The best way to get better is to leave your ego in the parking lot."----Eddie Wood, 1994
    *** We discovered that he had been educated beyond his intelligence........
    *** Student of Rigonomics & Gizmology

    Waste Knot Woods
    Rice, VA

  3. #3
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    Angled half-blind dovetails on 8/4 lumber. I may never do that again.
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Jones View Post
    Filing a square to tolerance.
    Ha-ha, what file, what length, was it hand forged, was it unobtainium steel, do you wear the proper cloths and shoes, what brand of eye protection, did you use left or right hand, did you build a proper bench, did you properly dispose of the filings?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie Moriarty View Post
    Angled half-blind dovetails on 8/4 lumber. I may never do that again.
    i remember that. Derek was doing his angled ones about the same time, lots of them.
    Jim

  6. #6
    Long rips. The longer rips with a 4-7 point saw. I can never seem to find square or plum and feel that I waste a lot of time, and wood truing up with my jointer/jack planes. Joinery sawing seems fine.

    Like most of the hand tool lessons(and life too) it always seems to come back to patience and focus.

  7. #7
    Power tool - Three-way miter joint (four of them. I was dumb enough to do it twice...with a 50% success rate)

    Hand tool - Fox wedging (also four of them, a one-shot deal that I decided not to try my luck again)

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 12-03-2018 at 1:15 PM.

  8. #8
    My trick is to set the tolerance level to 0.01" or, if I failed the first time, 0.02" per inch...

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 12-03-2018 at 11:48 AM.

  9. #9
    The ultimate......disagreeing with my wife.

    The worst for me is multiple joint glueups.
    Dave Anderson
    Chester Toolworks LLC
    Chester, NH

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Hartlin View Post
    Long rips. The longer rips with a 4-7 point saw. I can never seem to find square or plum and feel that I waste a lot of time, and wood truing up with my jointer/jack planes. Joinery sawing seems fine.

    Like most of the hand tool lessons(and life too) it always seems to come back to patience and focus.
    i believe that is one of those things that you get really good at when done often. For myself I do as you do, jointer usually.
    i saw off the line, try very hard to stay plumb. When you get to the point where you can rip a 6’ glue line with a handsaw please share with me.
    Jim

  11. #11
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    For me it's shaping two or more (hopefully) matching curves.
    AKA - "The human termite"

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Anderson NH View Post
    The ultimate......disagreeing with my wife.

    The worst for me is multiple joint glueups.
    i did that twice, not too bright I. First time was a lecture, second time I’d like to forget but can’t.
    it is strange how well a glue up can be done without glue. I believe that glue does some chemical thing to your brain, like washing, that makes you forget even your name.
    Jim

  13. #13
    Making that first chop at the base of the pins or tails on dovetails. I always push back that confounded line. Also paring the base lines flat. Too much tearout.

    Planing maple.

    Sanding bowls.

  14. #14
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    Don’t know if my tolerances are different than yours, but I have not found ripping to be an issue. A proper saw bench made the biggest difference for me. Having the board at the right height helps a lot in getting hand, arm, eye, etc. aligned and that keeps you reasonably straight and square. If you have not built a saw bench, it is worth doing in my opinion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Hartlin View Post
    Long rips. The longer rips with a 4-7 point saw. I can never seem to find square or plum and feel that I waste a lot of time, and wood truing up with my jointer/jack planes. Joinery sawing seems fine.

    Like most of the hand tool lessons(and life too) it always seems to come back to patience and focus.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #15
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    Resaw and miter joints

    Quote Originally Posted by James Pallas View Post
    I read lots of questions about tasks in woodworking. Recently one about mortise or tenon first. What is your biggest fear. Not the arts sort type things like carving but just general tasks. Is it curves, angles, sawing to the line, planing to the line, marking out, etc? For instance, If you cut five mortises and five tenons to fit and the dog ate your mortised piece would you put it all aside or just make a new mortise piece?
    Jim
    For me, resawing and mitered joints.

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