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Thread: Shoulder injury

  1. I had the same injury, slap tear, and ended up eventually going with surgery for a resolution. Six months of therapy and pain prior to surgery. I will caution you that recovery is a long process that limits you for a long period of time before back to “normal”. Since I was injured at work, my employer required 100% release from doctors care before I was able to return to work. I work as a electrician and there is no “light duty.” It was a six and a half month recovery for me, with the last three months, of four hours a day of therapy.
    I am currently two years post surgery, and doing much better. Pain and discomfort is manageable, and I am able to return to work without any restrictions. 28 years of work in the trades is hard on your body, so there’s going to be aches and pains.
    I am glad that I got the repair, that being said, the recovery in one word, “sucked.” I am capable now of sleeping without waking every 1.5 hours due to shoulder pain.
    Good luck with your recovery. If you have any other questions, let us know.

  2. #17
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    Shoulder pain is very common. So many shoulder surgeries in aging people have no scientific evidence that they improve outcomes. The zeal of the surgeon and the desperation of the patient result in a surgical procedure that may help, may do nothing or may hurt. Go slow, give your body a chance to heal. Frequently it does.

  3. #18
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    Oct 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Anderson View Post
    I'm following this as I injured my left shoulder two months ago and have been doing PT. Some improvement, but still not right. My ortho guy specializes in shoulders. Initial X-ray didn't show anything. I go back Thursday for a re-evaluation. Initially he said he would do an MRI if PT didn't do the trick. We will see. Not looking forward to 3 months of recovery if I need surgery.
    Recovery depends on your job, a desk only guy could say 3 months, a painter could need 12 months, mine took at least twelve months because of my job and then the doctor put permanent restrictions on me. It was work related so they had to wear it for my last years of work.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  4. #19
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    Sep 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by david mcnamara View Post
    I had the same injury, slap tear, and ended up eventually going with surgery for a resolution. Six months of therapy and pain prior to surgery. I will caution you that recovery is a long process that limits you for a long period of time before back to “normal”. Since I was injured at work, my employer required 100% release from doctors care before I was able to return to work. I work as a electrician and there is no “light duty.” It was a six and a half month recovery for me, with the last three months, of four hours a day of therapy.
    I am currently two years post surgery, and doing much better. Pain and discomfort is manageable, and I am able to return to work without any restrictions. 28 years of work in the trades is hard on your body, so there’s going to be aches and pains.
    I am glad that I got the repair, that being said, the recovery in one word, “sucked.” I am capable now of sleeping without waking every 1.5 hours due to shoulder pain.
    Good luck with your recovery. If you have any other questions, let us know.
    I think I have the same thing my wife wants to know how was your diagnosed what was the surgery like did you have to stay in the hospital. She bugs me about stuff like this as she is a planner and I am not I will just jump into something and get it done. She will plan for days and then decide not to do it.

  5. #20
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    Apr 2007
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    Churchton, MD
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    I imaging most of us have experienced shoulder injuries of various types and degrees. 14 months ago I endured on of my most stubborn protracted pain fests (the usual - clothes dressing accompanied by the sharpest of red-zone pains). I started to lose hope that it would heal itself. I wore a shoulder sling-heater at night and tried to keep arm levels low during the day. Somehow, someway the pain started to lessen and the healing, though slow at first, continued till I could sense that it would be ok. Emerging from that tunnel of pain makes one want to just hug that sweet healing shoulder. Wanted to write to say to not sleep on nutrition requirements for our aging bodies and joints. I hope you find a recovery.

  6. #21
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    Oct 2005
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    Both my Rotor cuff injuries had periods where they did not cause any injuries but gradually the left got to the point where it to be repaired. The right ceased to cause me problems becuase as the xray technician said to his mate...there wasn't enough tendon left to cause impingement so i have never seen the necessity to have the op.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  7. Quote Originally Posted by Jerome Stanek View Post
    I think I have the same thing my wife wants to know how was your diagnosed what was the surgery like did you have to stay in the hospital. She bugs me about stuff like this as she is a planner and I am not I will just jump into something and get it done. She will plan for days and then decide not to do it.
    With the doctors recommendation an MRI was used for the diagnosis, xrays were tried in the beginning. Trouble is that xrays have difficultly showing soft tissue injuries.
    Surgery was outpatient, about three hours, no hospital stay. They cut my bicep off and re attrached in a different location, then extensive debridement. I had a spinal block for pain that lasted about three days, which helped. I also used a ice/compression shoulder wrap post surgery for two weeks. It circulates ice water in the wrap and provides squeeze/compression to reduce swelling and promote healing.
    A powered electric recliner/chair in my opinion is a must, its going to be your bed for a while and getting in and out of it and reclining helps a lot. You cant get in and out of bed, even if you could, you cant lay down comfortably.
    Let me know if you have more questions.

  8. #23
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    Oct 2005
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    I remember that now, laying down on bed was the hardest thing to do so I slept semi reclining. I was lucky in that as long as my arm was immobile in a sling (six weeks) I had very little pain apart when I started Physio a few days after the op. They gave me bottles of pills and I threw them away IIRC.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Los Angeles
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    I have some good news about my slap tear injury that might interest some of you.

    I went to see a different physical therapist on Friday. He gave me some insights and do and don't that has helped reduce the pain enormously.

    Long story short he had me stand with my arms by my side and breathe in as I straighten up and roll my hand outwards a little, relaxing and straightening my shoulders.

    Then breathe out as I slump / relax.

    And do this about 10 times.

    Next he pressed on (deep massaged?) the muscle that covers my left shoulder blade.
    This was very sensitive and unpleasant.
    Next he showed me how to do this myself with a tennis ball up against a wall. He prefers a lacrosse ball as they are harder.

    I do all this four or five times a day. It has made a world of difference. Over the weekend I had to do a rush job that had me working 6 am til 11 pm on Sunday, with stress levels that would normally exacerbate physical issues, but I took the time to do my shoulder rolls and massaging with a tennis ball and it kept me able to work. Sleep has also improved.

    What is interesting also to me here is that I had done 8 weeks of physical therapy during October and November and the pain had worsened. This first therapist did not address the muscle that covers my shoulder blade.
    My surgeon then gave me a cortisone shot, but that only marginally improved my comfort. She suggested I try therapy again, and said they will now be able to work on the injury in a way they couldn't before I had the shot.

    I decided not to go back to the first physical therapist. She is very professional and thorough, but she is young. A buddy insisted a therapist he goes to is very good and encouraged me to go.
    I went, not expecting much, and it's a long drive which is never ideal.
    Glad I went. His experience and talent really matters.

    So I hope my experience will be useful to some of you. I know everyone's case is different, and if my friend had not know of this new therapist to recommend to me I may well have opted for surgery, with all the recovery problems.

    The new therapist used just his insight, his fingers and a tennis ball. No fancy equipment.
    If you have shoulder issues or other physical ailments no matter where you live hopefully you can find a talented therapist to help you.

  10. #25
    Been there ...Done that... After 3 years I still feel the pain...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #26
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    Feb 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Beitz View Post
    Been there ...Done that... After 3 years I still feel the pain...
    Kevin, hang in there! The pain goes away for most people I've compared notes with.

    18 years after my rotator cuff surgery I still have some pain but no limits on motion or strength. Not a bad trade off.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Houston
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    I just saw this thread. I had a torn labrum last year (but the doctor didn't call it a SLAP tear). One day I suddenly could not put my shirt on or use my mouse at the computer without extreme pain.

    The doctor said that surgery would fix it but the recovery time would be long. He said that about 50% of his patients stop having pain without the surgery and suggested physical therapy. With my work, the surgery and immobility afterwards would have been difficult.

    While deciding what to do, I read a lot of stuff on the Internet, and there was a doctor in New York who said that most people in their 50s who suddenly get pain like that without a specific incident might just have irritated a prior shoulder injury, so that time and physical therapy might allow a return to normal, even though the injury doesn't actually get "healed." I had had trouble with push ups and the like for several years, and I came to the conclusion that going "all in" for a few months at one of the cycling classes that involves repetitive lifting of weights overhead during the class must have exacerbated a prior injury.

    Anyway, I did the physical therapy route for about a month and a half. Lots of stretching of the shoulder joint. Pain gradually went away, even after stopping the physical therapy. After about 3 months, the pain was basically gone, and it has fortunately stayed gone. I have about the same mobility as I did beforehand, and I am just careful now about doing anything that involves lifting heavy things above my head.

    Hope your recovery goes well.

  13. #28
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    Sep 2009
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    Medina Ohio
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    My MIR came back and I have a torn rotator cuff sugary is set for next month. pain wakes me up 2 to 3 times a night. I have pain all day but not as bad when the shoulder pops.

  14. #29
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    Sep 2007
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    Upstate NY
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    Totally different injury, but....

    Surgeon wanted to schedule me, but a therapist said he could get me through it. That was 17 years ago.
    Your surgeon was probably right. Mine wasn't.

  15. #30
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    Sep 2009
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    Medina Ohio
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    Surgeon said it would never get better but may get worse. He said therapy may work to relive some pain but the pain at night would be the problem. I have lived with this pain for a year now and it seems to be just as bad as when it started. During the summer it wasn't as bad so I thought it was getting better.

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