Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: Looking for ideas on Dehumidification kild

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Columbus Ohio
    Posts
    332

    Looking for ideas on Dehumidification kild

    I am considering building a Dehumidification kiln. I live in central Ohio. I would like to keep it easy and cheap. Any ideas and/or pics would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Columbus Ohio
    Posts
    332
    I meant kiln of course.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Elmodel, Ga.
    Posts
    287
    Check with WoodMizer Sawmills. https://woodmizer.com/us/Products/Se...ocessing/Kilns They have several kilns and have a kit with plans also. They can probably help you.

    https://woodmizer.com/us/Products/Se...ocessing/Kilns
    SWE

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Elmodel, Ga.
    Posts
    287
    Sorry if this is a duplicate reply. Check out WoodMizer's website. They have kilns and kits and may be able to give you some advice.

    https://woodmizer.com/us/Products/Se...ocessing/Kilns

    Let us know how it turns out. Would be interested on hearing of your project.
    Steve
    SWE

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    5,472
    I built one from plans in FWW many years ago. It runs a 40 pt dehumidifier, 3, 100 W lightbulbs for heat, and a 500 cfm fan I had lying around. I think it cost me about $400 to build and can dry 275 BF in a load. It runs at a constant 110F and has automatic RH control. I would not recommend it for green lumber but it works very well to bring AD lumber down to 6 -8% in about 10 - 14 days at a cost of around $20.

    John

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Columbus Ohio
    Posts
    332
    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    I built one from plans in FWW many years ago. It runs a 40 pt dehumidifier, 3, 100 W lightbulbs for heat, and a 500 cfm fan I had lying around. I think it cost me about $400 to build and can dry 275 BF in a load. It runs at a constant 110F and has automatic RH control. I would not recommend it for green lumber but it works very well to bring AD lumber down to 6 -8% in about 10 - 14 days at a cost of around $20.

    John
    This is what I was I was thinking. Do you remember what issue the plans are in?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mountain City, TN
    Posts
    412
    Try issue 91. I found this on Fine Woodworking's forum. Also, FWW offers an electronic version of all issues.

  8. #8
    I am attempting to set up a wood dryer, Starting with a 48' insulated reefer box, with a track to roll the lumber inside. Plan to use some solar collectors for heat, then fans to circulate the air and finally some dehumidifiers to remove the moisture from inside the box.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Milwaukie, OR
    Posts
    32
    My experience is that a run of the mill dehumidifier has a dew point and stops working at 96-98 degrees F. I wasted money on an "industrial" unit and it was no better then a unit from Home depot. Over 100 F your going to need either a dehumidification kiln (ie. mizer's model, EBAC or Nyle are the most common) or a high end dehhumidifiers that have a higher dew point and continue to function at the temps needed to dry wood ie. >120 F. After researching both options I concluded I was better off buying a unit intended for wood kilns. I bought the EBAC 3000 and can comfortably dry 2000-2500 bf of most hardwoods up to 14' long and 10/4. The Nyle and Mizer models (essentially the same unit) are more expensive and can monitor your progress more accurately then the EBAC but they are almost twice the cost. EBAC's service is sketchy at best with only one guy in the states who handles all the technical questions. Every conversation I had with NYLE was immediate and helpful.

    Similar to John's prior response, I have seen numerous You-Tube videos of homemade kilns with a timer, couple of light bulbs, home dehumidifier, and a couple of fans that seemed to do the trick. Maybe they do in other climes and parts but here in the NW Oregon it didn't.

  10. #10
    Was reading comments from the wood doc, and he said to run the dehumidifiers on a timer, so after the solar quits heating, have the dehumidifiers set to come on in the evening as that is when they are most effective.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    5,472
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Curtis View Post
    This is what I was I was thinking. Do you remember what issue the plans are in?
    Oh, sorry Matthew, I haven't looked at this in awhile. The FWW article is in the Nov/Dec 1991 issue, whatever that is. Also note, there is a correction to the wiring diagram in issue #98, and it's important so if you copy the control system you need to look up that correction as well.

    I have had no troubles with my old 40 pint consumer grade dehumidifier working at the control temp. of 110F. I don't think the author or the FWW article did either because he made no mention of it in this article. The kiln runs at a constant 110F and relies on the dehumidifier to remove water from the sealed kiln, so it wouldn't make much sense if it didn't work. But again, I start with AD lumber and I think the author of the author did, too.

    John

  12. #12
    If you can find sliding glass doors cheap I think thats the way to go...
    Works great....
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
    Kevin, now that is an interesting way to dry wood! Turn it out of the sun when you are not drying. How did you install the glass?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Hill, NC
    Posts
    2,195
    The problem with most home type dehumidifiers in a kiln environment is that they won't last. Kilns are very corrosive to metal (especially if you dry oak), and the home units will not last.

    Solar kilns are great if you don't have much concern with powder post beetles in your area. The most common design is by Virginia Tech

    https://pubs.ext.vt.edu/420/420-030/420-030.html

    I operate four of the VT design solar kilns, along with a Nyle L200.

  15. #15
    The glass was just sliding glass doors...
    Attached Images Attached Images

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •