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Thread: Paul Sellers an amateur woodworker

  1. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Excuse my ignorance...is these guys' focus mostly on traditional woodworking? Since this discussion takes place in the Neanderthal section, all my references to people are about those whose practice (other than for the purpose of stock preparation) and key interest are in or with hand tools. I don't think I have seen their names in any traditional woodworking events organized by various parties such as LN, FW, Benchcrafted, PWW, etc. in the past decade. Neither did their names ring a bell to me when I tried to relate them to woodworking schools such as Marc Adams, North Bennet Street School. etc.

    Simon
    Mea Culpa, I tend to forget the handtool forum is more focused than the powertool forum which tends to run wide since it includes general woodworking.
    Of all the laws Brandolini's may be the most universally true.

    Deep thought for the day:

    Your bandsaw weighs more when you leave the spring compressed instead of relieving the tension.

  2. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    There is a misconception about Sellers's view on power tools. Well before his latest bandsaw episode, Sellers has maintained that he does use power tools. Of course, other than the cordless drills, he is rarely seen in any of his videos working with a power tool or machine. In his old place, he had given most of the lumber preparation (jointing/thicknessing) to another woodworker to do who happened to be operating out of the same building. I am pretty sure that unless he does not sleep, he is not doing stock preparation for his online class/youtube all by hand. It is most likely that stock preparation is the responsibility of someone else either in his team or an outsider.

    Simon
    No mea culpa here, I thought of the analogy carefully. July 25th was not the first time Dylan picked up an electric guitar, it is the date he first performed wired for the world.

    If you have some time to waste the replies Paul makes to the comments on his video are rather interesting. He seems at once very defensive of his power tool usage and at the same time demonizes machines, he also makes an odd comment about not considering them tools. There was also some reference to our bodies 25 senses and how machines are an assault (<paraphrased verb) on all of them.

    I am truly looking forward to the remainder of the series, partially because I like to guess ones position on the many bandsaw "points of disagreement". I am pretty sure I know how he will land on tension, blade selection, guides and the rest of the contentious issues. Bandsaws are the sharpening of the machine world.

    I do find it interesting we can have a long discussion rooted in the simple act of a man self-applying a seemingly (too) humble adjective. I have been waiting patiently for someone to go all Lord Byron on him and suggest that self-depreciation is hubris instead of humility. Are there no champions of Romanticism left? Or is it simply that people find it hard to take lessons on hubris from a man with the excesses of Byron?

    In the end, I like Paul, learned enough from him to be worth the time debt I paid to learn it, I can't say that of many youtube creators. I like how he gives the novice a direct roadmap to good enough with things like benches, sharpening, planes and of all things grocery store chisels. There was a day not too long ago before having a friend over for a shop tour Work Zone chisels would be buried in the back of a drawer else the host suffer the indignation of being caught with tools bought from the German Walmart of foodstuffs. Now they would be proudly left out on display with expectations of the knowing man nod of the tool steel cognoscenti and a brief bowed silence for the man that pointed them on the road to satori.
    Of all the laws Brandolini's may be the most universally true.

    Deep thought for the day:

    Your bandsaw weighs more when you leave the spring compressed instead of relieving the tension.

  3. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    The current rate is 3.7 British pound per hour, or less than $5 US.

    Simon
    Which is like icing on top.

  4. #109
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Guest View Post
    Which is like icing on top.
    Compared to the paying pupils, I suppose so.

    Simon

  5. #110
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Huskey View Post

    If you have some time to waste the replies Paul makes to the comments on his video are rather interesting. He seems at once very defensive of his power tool usage and at the same time demonizes machines, he also makes an odd comment about not considering them tools. T
    Sellers is a great communicator as a woodworking educator; he is able to demonstrate and articulate many of the hand skills and techniques in a way many other hand-tool instructors don't or can't. For example, when he explains how he holds a combo square to layout a line, he does not just say "Hold the square and ...." He goes through finger by finger to explain his way of holding a square. I don't think anyone else in print or in video goes through that simple but critical process in marking out. I have seen people struggle with a "moving" combo square while knifing a line. Sellers's way is not the only way, but those strugglers could benefit from his instructions as an alternative. It is details like that that set him apart from a lot of other instructors.

    However, Sellers is not always a good writer (like Chris Schwarz), and many of his blog posts are written with no to little editing, meaning he could say one thing but mean another without himself knowing it. I have not read much about his thinking on power tools, and he might indeed have written something that gave the impression that he hated power tools, etc. But I am sure I heard him in one of his videos saying he uses power tools, and power tools have their place.

    Simon

  6. #111
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    Latest blog I have from Sellers, he talks about using his Bandsaw....

  7. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Sellers is a great communicator as a woodworking educator; he is able to demonstrate and articulate many of the hand skills and techniques in a way many other hand-tool instructors don't or can't. For example, when he explains how he holds a combo square to layout a line, he does not just say "Hold the square and ...." He goes through finger by finger to explain his way of holding a square. I don't think anyone else in print or in video goes through that simple but critical process in marking out. I have seen people struggle with a "moving" combo square while knifing a line. Sellers's way is not the only way, but those strugglers could benefit from his instructions as an alternative. It is details like that that set him apart from a lot of other instructors.

    However, Sellers is not always a good writer (like Chris Schwarz), and many of his blog posts are written with no to little editing, meaning he could say one thing but mean another without himself knowing it. I have not read much about his thinking on power tools, and he might indeed have written something that gave the impression that he hated power tools, etc. But I am sure I heard him in one of his videos saying he uses power tools, and power tools have their place.

    Simon
    Its in print but I think Kirby describes holding the square in a similar fashion in his dovetail book. Just a note to mention that, carry on.

  8. #113
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Wilkins View Post
    Its in print but I think Kirby describes holding the square in a similar fashion in his dovetail book. Just a note to mention that, carry on.
    Indeed he does: p. 62; more or less same as Sellers's grip. Ian is one of those down-to-earth instructors I enjoy, as much as I find Jim Kingshott, another British, a good source of knowledge.

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 11-18-2018 at 4:11 PM.

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