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Thread: Sash by hand in cherry

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Anderson NH View Post
    Excellent work Mark. Making sash is one of the fussier and more difficult forms of hand tool woodworking. Gads, I haven't heard the name Todd Herrli in quite a while.
    Thanks Dave. Todd is a great plane maker but I think he is into making boats now...I emailed him about the plane recently was kind enough to give me some advice

  2. #17
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  3. #18
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    Looks great from here Mark. I wonder how many normal citizens realize just how much work, skill and care go into something (to them) like a simple sash?
    David

  4. #19
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    Looks great excellent work Mark .
    Aj

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Eisenhauer View Post
    Looks great from here Mark. I wonder how many normal citizens realize just how much work, skill and care go into something (to them) like a simple sash?
    Thanks David. You make a good point.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    Looks great excellent work Mark .
    Thanks Andrew!

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Some of the sash blades that have come my way for a Stanley #45 were modified by previous owners for custom or matching work. It isn't as hard as it may seem.
    Jim thanks for the suggestion on the Stanley 45, I am a hybrid woodworker and will use whatever tool will get the job done. Just out of curiosity how well does the 45 really work?

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert LaPlaca View Post
    Jim thanks for the suggestion on the Stanley 45, I am a hybrid woodworker and will use whatever tool will get the job done. Just out of curiosity how well does the 45 really work?
    They do have a bit of a learning curve. They will turn out good work when one is willing to take the needed time to learn its ways. They also help one to learn about using profiled blades. The experience will help if one wants to move up to other types of molding planes.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #24
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    Used some of my time out in the shop today to take some pictures of my sash blades and try one of the blades on a piece of scrap:

    Sash Blades.jpg

    On the left is a standard #1 sash blade that came with a Stanley #45. The second and third blades have been modified. The second plane has been shaped more like an ogee on the curved side. The third blade has been ground with a straight edge at an angle. The last blade is a #2 sash blade that is a mirror of the #1. This is used left handed for the back side of a work piece if the grain is problematic.

    Here is the Stanley #45 in use with a #1 sash blade:

    cutting Sash.jpg

    As with other molding work, it is important to pick stock that is fairly straight grained and compliant. Some pieces of wood work better than others.

    It is likely the same with dedicated sash planes to first get the plane set up on some scrap. Once it is cutting to one's liking then the work can proceed to the stock to be used for the finished work.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  10. #25
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    Hi Mark,

    Beautiful work! By the way, what is the name of the Hayward book, I like the idea of getting one! (My wife may not see the great value in such a purchase, however.)

    Stew

  11. #26
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    Thanks Stew! The book is called Woodworking Joints by Charles Hayward. My library got the book on interlibrary loan. I made a copy of the chapter on sash. PM me if you want me email you the pages.
    Quote Originally Posted by Stew Denton View Post
    Hi Mark,

    Beautiful work! By the way, what is the name of the Hayward book, I like the idea of getting one! (My wife may not see the great value in such a purchase, however.)

    Stew
    Last edited by Mark Rainey; 11-09-2018 at 10:48 PM.

  12. #27
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    Jun 2017
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    Raleigh, NC
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    Mein gott! Very impressing work.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Mikes View Post
    Mein gott! Very impressing work.
    Danke Steve!

  14. #29
    Very nice work, Mark. It's great to see someone making sash; I'd love to see this area of hand tool work get more attention.

  15. #30
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    Feb 2016
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    Amhrrst Jct
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    Really impressed, and in cherry no less. Just a quick question regarding the planes used. Why are coping planes so difficult to find.

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