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Thread: repairing marking gauges

  1. #1

    repairing marking gauges

    hello,
    I hardly post but read here alot and learned alot here. I was thinking on getting some extra marking gauges off of ebay as some of the older ones look really nice. I have noticed though that the pins in these gauges are worn out or not even there. I wasn't sure how to replace these if I choose to get one. Most of the time they are in the brass and I'm unsure if they are repairable.
    On another note I have seen alot of transitional planes and would like to know how they are typed like the stanley bench planes. There is info on them on the web but I have not found any instruction on how to identify them by type. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Hey Tim, I have heard that you can replace a missing/broken/worn out pin on a marking gauge with the slick end of a small drill bit. Grind a point on it. Assume you pull the old one out with some pliers/vise grips? Sorry, but I can't help with the transitional planes.
    David

  3. #3
    I used this to research my No. 26 Jack.
    http://www.hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/

  4. #4
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    The pins on my wooden gauges have been replaced with small nails and broken drill bits. It is a fairly easy operation.

    Flatten one side of the piece being used. Then sand, file or abrade the other side. You can make both sides flat for a slitting gauge. For mine one is left with a round shape on the side facing the gauge's fence. This will help to keep it from wandering as much.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #5
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    I don't have an answer, but I'll be following this. I've got a mortise gauge on which the pins are worn so short that I can't get a grip on them to pull them.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Houghton View Post
    I don't have an answer, but I'll be following this. I've got a mortise gauge on which the pins are worn so short that I can't get a grip on them to pull them.
    If the pins are held in a brass piece you can likely drive them out with a small pin punch. You will have to take the gauge apart to do this.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
    Thanks for the replies. I was thinking that you must somehow be able to drive the old pins out. I guess it would be quite the challenge somehow press fitting by hand of course new pins. I'm thinking fitting an old drill bit by filing and or emery cloth until it can very tightly inserted, then sharpening it up?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Bieker View Post
    Thanks for the replies. I was thinking that you must somehow be able to drive the old pins out. I guess it would be quite the challenge somehow press fitting by hand of course new pins. I'm thinking fitting an old drill bit by filing and or emery cloth until it can very tightly inserted, then sharpening it up?
    Sharpening before installation will likely be easier. Use a pair of pliers to hold the pin during installation to save your fingers.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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