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Thread: Vintage Martin T75 restoration

  1. #976
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    New Jersey
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    434
    Agree with the others, base looks great!

  2. #977
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    1,692
    Thanks guys,

    It’s good to get positive feedback.

    I really set the bar high for myself or a task “autobody paint and painting” one I have zero experience with the other plenty but almost fifteen ears ago now.

    I was fully prepared to accept some amount of defeat on the paint portion of this project. Honestly even the mechanical restoration. Having never done anything like this ever before I kinda expected failure or less than stellar results could be a real possibility.

    The saw is not under power and cutting boards accurately just yet so there’s still time for it all to go wrong.

  3. #978
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    1,692
    Not as exciting as some of the other posts but it’s something for you all.

    Well this is exciting for me as this is kinda the end of the paint for me. Yup I’m excited about that. It’s gonna nearly eat me alive waiting to put this machine back together though and get to using it.

    Most of the below are pieces I chose to re paint. Everytime I take the time to get it right I’m always so glad I did. Namely the sliding table. This is one of the most visible pieces on the saw. It was in terrible shape previously and has hours and hours of prep into it. Not to mention three attempts at a finish coat. Tonight I finally got it right!

    Now I just gotta make a base for the base and crates to the move the two sliding table pieces so some monkey doesn’t screw one up moving it complaining how heavy they are thinking it’s just a saw who cares if it gets scratched.

    Pretty much the next thing you will see from me is the hand wheel scales and it all put back together....

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  4. #979
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Buck Lake, Alberta
    Posts
    166
    Looking forward to watch it go back together.
    Your doing a great job.

  5. #980
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,692
    Thanks mike, me also..

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Delyster View Post
    Looking forward to watch it go back together.
    Your doing a great job.

  6. #981
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,692
    Table out of tape...

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    Underside of sliding table. Just gotta love it. You would never see something made so well today. If you do you canít afford it and it darn sure aint a saw.

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    And pretty much all that remains at work.

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    Expensive day for me at work today. Dropped my phone down the elevator shaft from the fourth floor all the way to the first. Then I tossed a off-cut from the slider into a barrel right in front of those huge glass windows itís bounced and it went clear through and landed on someoneís car.

    Yikes!

  7. #982
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    5,854
    Blog Entries
    7
    Ouch, sounds like a rough day.

    This is looking pretty dang sweet, time to send it home and bolt it together.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  8. #983
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,775
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post

    Expensive day for me at work today. Dropped my phone down the elevator shaft from the fourth floor all the way to the first. Then I tossed a off-cut from the slider into a barrel right in front of those huge glass windows it’s bounced and it went clear through and landed on someone’s car.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #984
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    1,692
    Jim you nailed it,

    Sums yesterday up perfectly..

    Today was a much better day.

    Nice calm relaxing day actually “a bit mind melting” running the mitered details around a oak island I have been working on. I needed it. Now four days off working around the clock re building my front deck.

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    Normally I don’t share the work from my 9-5 as I consider most of just crap and nothing I’m really proud of or have much any respect for. This piece happens to be pretty nice. Someone made a thread recently asking if cabinet makers actually work from rough stock anymore. Every darn stick on this piece was milled from rough and picked for grain matching and alignment. I don’t have working side pictures but every stile and ever rail face frame included is one continuous board cut up to make the parts so the grain all runs together.

    Honestly we make pretty darn nice cabinets all in all as far as modern cabinets go. Even the high end market only allows for so much regrading actual quality with regard to construction techniques and material. Anyway I like this one and feel lucky I’m getting paid to build it. I have a few more pieces coming up right after it much to same. I should enjoy my work for the summer so long as the boss finds a way to keep me in the shop and not in the field installing. Makes me want to just put out a darn window field work.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post

  10. #985
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    48,775
    That oak island really is nicely done and I'm VERY glad to hear that you folks do careful grain and color matching. That singular thing is the difference between "merely nice" and "extraordinarily eye catching nice"!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #986
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Edmonton, Canada
    Posts
    2,190
    Oak isn't a wood I like (or like to work with) but that island has turned very nice.

  12. #987
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    Yeah oak isn’t my first choice either but you know it seems to be making a strong comeback thanks for Restoration Hardware. I do however like working with it, I find it fairly easy and forgiving if you just pay attention grain direction and orientation to your machines or tools. When shaping o just oversize my pieces then trim to exact size when I know I have evaded tearout disaster.

    This piece is getting a finish I’m not sure how I feel about. The good news is I don’t have to feel any particular way as I’m not building it for me.

    https://www.brownrigg-interiors.co.u...24-refno-7903/

  13. #988
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Patrick, I'm not an oak lover, either, but as an aside, if you get the opportunity to work with English Brown Oak (which is a white oak variety that naturally is a "nut brown" color with creamy sapwood from a fungus), go for it. I've done two hall tables with it and just bought another small hunk from Hearne not long ago so I'd have it when I found the right inspiration to use it.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #989
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,692
    Jim I donít mind oak used properly.

    I am familiar with English brown oak, I rather like French oak and I think itís called pitty English brown oak.

    Proof Iím not avoiding the Martin,

    Bellow are the two worlds best helpers. Thatís my mom and Iíd take her help over anyone else bar none. She has the will and determination of a bull and is where I get my need for perfectionism along with work ethic. She is 61 and has been working 12-15 hr days my whole life. When I ask ďhowís your endĒ I never come back to find out it was to short or tow long and wanna rig my helps necks cuz they considered it good enough.

    The pup keeps us level headed and zen like, heís got the best disposition. Heís everything all of arenít and or have to work overtime to try and be.

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    So I had the deck framed much to my hesitation. Before I was building cabinets I was building custom homes. My last gig I was one of five carpenters that could build a home frame to finish. Well kinda, in theory we all could but only a couple of us cared to execute quality work the other three were just get it done types.

    Anyway Iím regretting hiring out the frame. I know better as honestly and Iím sorry if I offend anyone I just loath dreamers and general carpenters. I donít care what you say to me about 1/4Ē over x amount of feet is to be expected yada yada. I say horse poop.

    So the deck was out of square 1/2. Then the field joist when referenced to the ledger board and rim joist had a 3/8 sag over the 8í From the front of the porch to the front wall of my house. Every dam hanger was not snugged up tight to the bottom of the joist and none of them where complainer or flush to the ledger board or rim joist.

    As a result I ripped and planed pressure treated shims the full length of all the joist. I was cursing the framer up and down. A project that should and taken a couple short 8 hr days took forever. I wonít even admit how many hours I have into what you see. The only thing you donít see is the facia board I also hung. Otherwise your looking at my ďlongĒ Memorial Day weekend.

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    I used a chisel to knock the bungs down then a piano makers plane to bring them flush. Iíll sand everything later down the road when the rest of the project is done. All and all your looking at about 600 bungs.

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    I donít dare show you pictures of the other three sides of my house. Youíll all say the Martin is never getting finished!
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 05-28-2019 at 6:42 PM.

  15. #990
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    3,651
    Looks great! The first house I built, I hired subs. For the next 44 years, I've done everything myself, and I'm sure you know why.

    Did you see the ad for a custom organ company that's looking for a cabinetmaker? If not, send me a PM, and I'll send you a link.

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