Page 5 of 66 FirstFirst 1234567891555 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 977

Thread: Vintage Martin T75 restoration

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Martin, was it one with the long cast iron outfeed? That’s an impressive setup with the counterbalance system to keep it level. It seems more robust than the more common cantilever type.
    No, it was a DH63 I think? Pretty standard looking planer, it was in very nice condition and reasonably priced. I would've been much happier with it than my Format 4, which isn't bad, just underwhelming.

    By the time I decided I should buy it, it was gone.



    Warren, that's a fantastic thread idea.

  2. #62
    I think its kinda painful, ask my lady friend who has heard me whine and wanted to put me into therapy. One auction I did I went 9 hours only to get down to three excellent machines amongst others towards the end and I was into burn out, likely not able to count to five at that point.

    Guy there in leather pants (who wears leather pants to an auction or anywhere for that matter ) company name on his coat another branch, he was there on a mission to buy the Baurle Planer, Jointer and an SCM T-160. Auctions run faster than my brain often and been up against some big deal people before and that changes the dynamic when they are there specifically for stuff or were sent. Lovely jointer and planer and shaper they were heavy as hell, well maintained, nice style as well, Ive photoed alot of shops before they were torn apart, its pretty sad 50 years or more and huge history to build and refine these things, full of trained european craftsman then a few days later its all pulled apart, beeping forklifts dust and a pretty empty shell other than the last to come down the dust collection pipe. several days and a huge piece of history is gone. serious when its over 100 shops.

  3. #63
    The Kolle HDA63 I had.
    I had a chance to buy it back recently

    https://youtu.be/FKKQj61IYos

  4. #64
    I think a machines I shouldn't have bought would be a good idea

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    I think a machines I shouldn't have bought would be a good idea
    I don't have too many of those. There's a lot of things I just couldn't afford to buy for a long time. But, virtually everything powermatic I've owned could've been avoided, I just didn't know any better

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,660
    So I went and looked at the machine today. This is what I came away with.

    I would appreciate any thoughts on what I have to share as I’m really considering buying it.

    So cosmetically it is old, the paint is chipped as expected down to cast iron all over. The rust is non existent to very minimal surface rust. It would all come off with minimal attention. Just the normal one would expect from a machine that has been in storage for a bit. To be honest less than you would expect.

    The sliding table has zero play in it per Peters suggestion when extended to the begging and end of its stroke. Like zero, nada, nothing zilch!

    The ways or little silver tracks that are set at a 90 % angle to each to each other on the extrusion that bolts to the side of the machine have almost no groove worn in them. What is worn is very very consistent and barely there. At no point does the slide hesitate in one spot the slightest.

    The table did haowever make a noise like it was rubbing something when slidden back and forth. At first I thought it was catching on the dust shroud that covers the arbor or blade. After further inspection I found one of the silver tracks much like the ones on the extrusion the sliding table runs on but mounted to the underside of the sliding table had come a bit loose in the middle. It was still connected securely at either end but delaminating in the middle. I have no idea how these are held on as I seen no meachnical fasteners. Must be some kind of adhesive?

    I also noticed and photographed another silver track of metal maybe 3/16 thick and 3/8 wide that seemed to float between the extrusion the slider runs on and the sliding table itself. This piece seems to act like a stop to limit the travel of the table itself. At first I though maybe this pice of metal was the culprit of the noise. Seems weird something just floats.

    Other than that the blade tilt worked well maybe a tiny bit stiff but barley. The blade fall and rise was also smooth but nothing like my sawstop, takes a tiny bit of muscle. The sliding table had not one itty bitty cut in it and the the machine had all its original accessories with with it including a brand new extruded fence and stop from Felder. The machine also comes with a pile of blades. Well 3-4 all in good condition and good blades.

    Ever original knob was on the machine. The rip fence traveled smoothly with not the slightest hesitation or play. The brass scale is there however it was pulling up in one area slightly. I’d have to remove it anyway to restore the machine and more importantly take the right cast table extension off to fit the machine into my shop.

    The machine oddly does have a 1.25” arbor. Being German both the owner and I find that strange. There was zero play in the arbor that I could detect. I wonder if the machine came 1.25” or if maybe the arbor was replaced at some point.

    Other than that I have nothing but lust for it. The table is heavy as can be and does not slide with ease like a modern Italian or German machine but it is butter smooth just heavy and takes a bit of muscle to get moving vrs blowing on it. It’s just heavy, everything about the machine is heavy so my guess is that is exactly how it’s supposed to be. I like the heavy thing.

    Thanks for all the help. Also if anyone can offer perspective via pm only what I should expect to pay for such a machine in such condition.

    882C157C-5DF0-4CB5-B28C-FE92A1F9866B.jpg
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 11-10-2018 at 5:00 PM.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,183
    I can't speak to the other stuff ( Joe, Peter, and Darcy are the go to guys here ) but I'm not surprised at the arbor. 1 1/8 and 1 1/4 were pretty common for old commercial saws. I would be more surprised if it were 1" as that is rare on old stuff. Sounds potentially like a option if someone knows about the table elements. Mark Hennebury might be a help here too. Dave

  8. #68
    All the t75s I had were 1 1/4" arbors.

    I cant make out anything in the picture.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,660
    I shoulda taken better pictures.

    The photo is of the sliding table sitting on the rail that mounts to the saw body as if you are right in front of the machine with the blade rise,fall,tilt just out of the picture to your right.

    If you take note of the painter over bolt and look to just about 3oclock you will see a silver piece. That piece is the piece that seems to just be floating.

    My only two concerns with the saw are this floating piece and that it’s actually supposed to float. And then the one rail mounted to the underside of the sliding table that seems to be delaminating. Otherwise I’m pretty sold on the machine.

    I am apprhensive to these two things though as I imagine they could be probelmic if indeed they are not as they are supposed to be. I imagine they could also be easy fixes but I don’t know if there a problem and or what the fix would be. I guess for me that would require taking the machine home and putting it to use and seeing what I come up with then dealing accordingly.

    Good news on the 1.25 darcy

  10. #70
    I also have a drawing of the dado arbor that my machinist made for me. Martin wanted like 3k for one. Lmao.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,660
    Funny the machines owner spoke of trying to run a magic Moulder head on the machine mostly for the haunch on integrated beaded face frames. Guess he figured it out using a t-hat bashing of sorts but never actually purchased the head and got it up and running.

    So does Martin still sell parts for this machine should I require something?

    I made him a offer lower than asking and he is hesitating. His asking is inline with what you shared selling your machines for Darcy. His machine is cosmetically not in near as nice as condition as the one I can find video of online or yours. If I couple thy with whatever this loose part is rattling around and the delaminating track I feel like that kinda $$ may not be warranted.

    I’d hate to see the machine disappear though cuz I just didn’t give the guy his asking price.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,543
    Based on your description, that sounds really promising and it also sounds like it was taken care of and/or not "over used". I can't help with valuation 'cause I don't have a clue about that.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,183
    Castings and parts that look difficult to make are what I look for. Parts that can be machined or turned on a lathe are usually cheaper to make than buy. Nothing coming from Martin will be cheap but I've never really had a problem fixing the good old stuff. You want a good motor guy and a machinist though. Dave

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    781
    I think all the T75s Reibling sold came with a 1.25 arbor to cater to the US market. My 1999 T72 is 1.25 also. I think when the T73 started in 2002 or so they started bringing in 30mm arbors.

    Sounds like good news on the wear of the ways. Mine had a slight groove about 1/4” wide. The de-laminated part should be fixable but no idea on what adhesive. They do push a little harder probably because the sliding table is cast and heavy. Even the new Martins do not slide as easy as Altendorf or SCM but the tables run accurately. There is a peculiar thing with the T75 to get full extension one way or the other you have to rock the table back and fourth to move the balls. Hard to explain but other owners will know what I mean. I had to do a lot of cleaning inside to get the rise and fall to work easy. I like hydro tilt but I don’t think any 75s had that.
    mine had 2 miter gauges and a device for setting the ruler on the fence and a panel support. All good things to have if they are with the saw.
    That saw in good running order set up with air clamps and a modern double miter would be a craftsman’s dream.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,660
    First joe,

    Thank you, you are also another invaluable resource for all us machine and Woodworking obsessed/ committed whatever or however you want to term it.

    Second by double miter I assume you mean the blade bevel as In a modern t75 or is my greeness showing through and I just donít know what I donít know.

    As for accessories Iíd have to look carefully. All i know is all the original fence parts where there the pressure clamp, original wrench, the wrench that goes onto the back of the saw to move the sliding table out to accommodate stacked or dado blades and a few other odds and ends I didnít pay attention to as myself and the seller were just having to good a time talking shop when I shoulda been going over the machine with a fine tooth comb.

    I always feel rude being overly focused kicking tires on a used machine when a seller is just interested in chatting and being friendly one woodworker to another.

    I have air clamps although it seems it would be hard to use more than one at a time when working with a full 8í sheet being the table is just over 8í. I bet I can rig something up if Iím so motivated.

    I am thinking tear it all the way down. Strip and repaint everything back to original factory color with a very high quality industrial metal paint, address potential isssues regarding function then polish up and or re plate all knobs shrouds and or whatever.

    Add Brian lambs new digital cross cut read outs dial in the brass rip fence scale or have it reproduced and I agree I have my DREAM SAW!

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Calhoon View Post
    I think all the T75s Reibling sold came with a 1.25 arbor to cater to the US market. My 1999 T72 is 1.25 also. I think when the T73 started in 2002 or so they started bringing in 30mm arbors.

    Sounds like good news on the wear of the ways. Mine had a slight groove about 1/4Ē wide. The de-laminated part should be fixable but no idea on what adhesive. They do push a little harder probably because the sliding table is cast and heavy. Even the new Martins do not slide as easy as Altendorf or SCM but the tables run accurately. There is a peculiar thing with the T75 to get full extension one way or the other you have to rock the table back and fourth to move the balls. Hard to explain but other owners will know what I mean. I had to do a lot of cleaning inside to get the rise and fall to work easy. I like hydro tilt but I donít think any 75s had that.
    mine had 2 miter gauges and a device for setting the ruler on the fence and a panel support. All good things to have if they are with the saw.
    That saw in good running order set up with air clamps and a modern double miter would be a craftsmanís dream.
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 11-10-2018 at 8:32 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •