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Thread: Vintage Martin T75 restoration

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
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    749
    My T75 was a 1968 and had the miter cross fence that had the protractor like half circle with large marks for the degrees. The tubular outrigger was a later model. Not sure how the miter worked on the later one but mine was accurate to about 1/10 of a degree and would return to square after the drop pin was adjusted. The later models had the ballbearing fence that folds down and a red stop button near the floor on the left side. If I were buying one now the later model would be my choice. I bought it used in late 80s to replace a new SCM Slider and ran it up till 1999 when I bought the T72A I still have.
    Mine did not have a scoring saw and really never felt like I needed one. The T72 has a electronic adjusting scoring saw. We use it when cutting Melimine, a rare occasion at our shop but most of the time it is out of the saw. Hardwood ply is no problem to cut without scoring. Over all I like everything about the T72 better than the T 75. Ours is pretty much non electric with hydro tilt and raise. Crank controlled rip fence on ball bearings and manual stops on the cross fence. The digital readout for fence, tilt and raise lower started going out a year ago but with some help from others traced the problem to a faulty wire.
    The T72 A that has all the electronic movement is one they are having trouble getting parts for so that one I would avoid.
    One big advantage of a T75 is in a small shop the foot print is pretty small for a saw that will cut 8’ sheets.

    I lust after a short stroke T17 or Panhans 609 but in reality my T72 can do anything these saws can and need the floor space.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    1,547
    Thanks guys,

    I’m gonna pass on my boses saw. He can probably get more from selling it than I’d be willing to spend on it. And even then it’s just not in very good condition. I gave the sliding table the lift test suggested by Peter today and it was horrific. For the sake of this particular machine I hope that just normal and peters mention of that was in relationship to the older Martin t75.

    I’m gonna go look at the t75 I found. Depending on condition I may finally satisfy my bug for a slider at a unexpected time. I’m pretty convinced a older saw like the T75 is the way to go for me if in good condition vrs a new Martin.

    My only concern is running it off single phase power and loosing 1/3 the hp of a 6.5hp motor. I regularly bog down 5hp motors on cabinet saws both sawstop and powermatic. I also have no idea the max blade size on the old t75 and the ability to cut thick stock is very important to me.

    We will see, guess it’s time to find time for a drive..

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,140
    Put a vfd on it. Way better than a static. Give Jack and Matt a call. Dave

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Beantown
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    that’s what I figured but the hp loss is nearly the same correct?

    Could I do something stupid and put a new motor on it like a 10hp run on a vfd and get my 7 hp back?


    Quote Originally Posted by David Kumm View Post
    Put a vfd on it. Way better than a static. Give Jack and Matt a call. Dave

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,140
    You won't lose any HP. The vfd needs to input about 30 amps @ 240 single phase to get enough output to run at full load but Jack has those for less than $500. Well worth the price. Have a brake resistor added and you will also get a way to stop the blade fairly quickly. Dave

    PS. that old Martin motor will be a large frame heavy motor unlike the small frame motors used on Euro machines made now. They are very well made and worth keeping.

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    Dave thanks for the help.

    You are a valuable resource for us all.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Williamstown,ma
    Posts
    877
    Patrick, to clarify, the lift test only works on the “captured ball” type setup the Martin STILL uses to this day, but now with hardened and replaceable steel strips.
    Roller style sliders such as the Altendorf will not yield any useful info from doing it. They lay on top of the saw and use only gravity and a type of stop finger under it to keep it from lifting off at the extreme travel lengths.
    The Martin has vee races adjusted and machined to the ball bearings used size tolerance.
    It will be obvious as soon as you see it. The balls ,over time on older non-hardened ways will start to wear “tolerance” into the vee races making for play.
    However, it takes a LOT of wear to make the saw inaccurate in daily use. The wear ideally should be uniform along the length of the ways to maintain an accurate cut.
    There should be good dust collection hooked up, along with a felt pad under the infeed end of the slider carriage that came on the saw originally. That pad should be oil soaked, and each stroke puts a light film of oil on the ways. ATF is a good product, as it has detergents to help clean.
    I do not remember the spec’s, but an old guy I ran into told me that up to around I think it was 3/8” to 1/2” of vertical lift at the end was where you would start to notice accuracy issues in the cut. It might have been 1/4” to 3/8”??

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
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    What do you all think of Kolle? I don’t hear much about them but some of the equipment they made looks really well built to me.

    I have been passively looking at their tenoners, which look to be built like a brick outhouse, maybe their sliders are an option for Patrick?
    Last edited by Brian Holcombe; 11-10-2018 at 9:36 AM.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  9. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    What do you all think of Kolle?
    I'm really upset I didn't buy a Kolle planer that was available a while back.
    I'm less upset about a Martin that I could've had as well.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
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    Kolle was up there with Martin and Hofmann. There was a beautiful jointer and matching planer for sale a couple of years ago. Sweet. There was also a combo jointer planer made by Hofmann that lasted about an hour. Hofmann may be top of the heap. Dave

  11. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    What do you all think of Kolle? I don’t hear much about them but some of the equipment they made looks really well built to me.

    I have been passively looking at their tenoners, which look to be built like a brick outhouse, maybe their sliders are an option for Patrick?
    Owned several Kolle, pretty nice machines.
    Bauerle is another really nice machine.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    Noticed a Kolle slot mortiser on ww about six months ago. Wanted to buy but other things top my tool list. Wish I had purchased it.

    Can’t have everything...

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
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    Martin, was it one with the long cast iron outfeed? That’s an impressive setup with the counterbalance system to keep it level. It seems more robust than the more common cantilever type.

    David, I had a feeling that jointer/planer would go quickly.

    Just in seeing photos of the machines there seems to be a lot of things that Kolle built very nicely, for example the tenoner’s ways appear to be removable and so presumably either adjustable or more easily resurfaced. That seems a much more feasible task than resurfacing a huge slab of cast iron at it’s sides but I could be wrong about that.

    Probably any of the three would be fantastic.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  14. #59
    if we start a thread on machines we screwed up and didnt buy you guys will be more tired of hearing from me. As Cher said "if I could turn back time"

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    48,268
    Honestly, this thread has been a great and educational discussion. I know I've appreciated it!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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