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Thread: Vintage Martin T75 restoration

  1. #31
    Steve summed up my thoughts well.

    I would only add, why are you packing this stuff into a basement? Spend some dollars on a space that is a little more accessible. I had riggers deliver a piece a few weeks ago, they dropped the semi trailer in the shop.

  2. #32
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    Oh, I have no issue with the idea of investing in what you really want and didn't mean to suggest "settling" on something inadequate. I certainly have handled my own tool purchases by buying the best I could afford. I do wonder if sometimes we individually (general statement not referring to you personally) see things in ways that might be more subjective than objective when we are trying to decide what we really want and why. Human nature, I suppose. If in the end, only the Martin (a fine machine) would make you happy, you'll find a way to make it happen.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #33
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    I get the thing about wanting to be happy with what you have but also keep in mind the economics of the deal. Can you earn enough extra to justify the cost of new high end? Borrowing for non income producing assets generally means that savings and investments are underfunded and when the newness wears off the payments are still there. There is also a pleasure when running a great machine that left you with money in the bank. Dave

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Yes I will,

    but I agree with the tone and logic behind less is more.

    After all I wear a hat daily that reads “live simply”...

    Everything but my tools and lumber, don’t mess with my tools lumber collection and free time to use them

    No kids, no wife and sadly down to one dog from two as of last week. Largely I just do what makes me happy.

    At this rate I will work till the day I die. Thank god I love my work baring the odd lazy co-worker that has perfected playing hide and go seek all day. Other than that and carpal tunnel I see no reason to not work till I fall over.

    Oh and based on my tax returns I have no business buying anything other than a can of tuna fish. If I gave into that reality though I’d be a very very unhappy man..

  5. #35
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    Mar 2003
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    You do really, really good work, Patrick...you're a true craftsman. I'm sure that you'll reach a decision that works best for you on this saw thing so that you can continue with that work in a way that's most comfortable and satisfying.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Williamstown,ma
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    Sorry for the late reply Patrick. I have been down for a couple days with severe vertigo. Anyway, there are a couple shops out this way that should/do have the size machines needed to do work of that length. If you are interested, I can forward you their names. I have used one of them years ago to resurface my jointer and bandsaw tables, and a friend used the other for some larger work.
    I think it much smarter to outfit a solid older saw with some newer measuring technology vs. Spending big coin on a new machine which WILL disappoint at some level.
    I have a Martin T75 PreX 12’ saw that we bought new about 6 years ago. It is a fine and accurate saw, but it has been at least a moderate disappointment in its capabilities, engineering, and build quality for me, when I look at what it cost.
    Things you will not pick up on, until you are using it daily, and then are so rudimentarily obvious that you can see they don’t bother investing in real shop real world feedback.
    If I am this un-plussed by their top end saw, I can only imagine what I would have issue with a lower class machine.
    I do have an older cast iron T75 that has wear in the ways, which is not an issue for the type of work I use it for. But I enjoy using more actually, though not nearly as capable as the newer machine.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Peter,

    Don’t worry about it, hope you doing better.

    I’m very surprised to hear you say your disappointed in your Prex. That’s kinda crazy, I do suppose for like $70 my expectations would be very very high.

    I see a old t75 local to us with the round extrusion for the sliding table that could work very very well for me. I love the older short stroke machines but I need to be able to process 8’ sheet stock. Maybe I should atake a drive and take a look.

    Can you tell me is your t75 the same vintage with the round extrusion? If so can you tell me how you feel about the design overall and any potential problematic areas and or features to look out for that can or can not be repaired if I shall choose to go such a route.

    Thanks again,
    Patrick

    Quote Originally Posted by peter gagliardi View Post
    Sorry for the late reply Patrick. I have been down for a couple days with severe vertigo. Anyway, there are a couple shops out this way that should/do have the size machines needed to do work of that length. If you are interested, I can forward you their names. I have used one of them years ago to resurface my jointer and bandsaw tables, and a friend used the other for some larger work.
    I think it much smarter to outfit a solid older saw with some newer measuring technology vs. Spending big coin on a new machine which WILL disappoint at some level.
    I have a Martin T75 PreX 12’ saw that we bought new about 6 years ago. It is a fine and accurate saw, but it has been at least a moderate disappointment in its capabilities, engineering, and build quality for me, when I look at what it cost.
    Things you will not pick up on, until you are using it daily, and then are so rudimentarily obvious that you can see they don’t bother investing in real shop real world feedback.
    If I am this un-plussed by their top end saw, I can only imagine what I would have issue with a lower class machine.
    I do have an older cast iron T75 that has wear in the ways, which is not an issue for the type of work I use it for. But I enjoy using more actually, though not nearly as capable as the newer machine.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    but I need to be able to process 8’ sheet stock.

    Got room for a vertical panel saw? I hate cutting sheets on a slider without an ergo. Even then, meh.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Not in my home shop.

    At work yes but this is for my home shop where I build primarily furniture. I do work from home from time to time when it nesesitates be it a day here or there, a week here or there or at times a month or two at a time. I buy and or am building my shop from the perspective that at any point in time I could find myself self employed out of choice or necessity. I’m also also planing for retirement and a day when I won’t be able to afford buying any of this stuff and being set up to build the things I want and do small projects for exctra money.

  10. #40
    Pure perfection.

    FB_IMG_1504014390780.jpg

  11. #41
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    Darcy,

    Can you get the cast iron tables off that thing. Both the sliding table and the cast table to the right of the blade.

    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    Pure perfection.

    FB_IMG_1504014390780.jpg

  12. #42
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    The ones I have owned are older versions of Darcy’s- only difference being fence style. The sliding part of the carriage is covered by aluminum plates, and has aluminum push/pull handle at the back. The older cast iron T75’s are more versatile- you can run dado heads, etc.
    Biggest difference between old and new is the slider fence assembly- newer is easier to angle and reposition to 90 accurately and repeatedly. I never moved mine, because I have the newer saw for that. The ball tracks can and do wear, but the saw will cut accurately even with moderate wear.
    The 8’ saws JUST have enough length for 8’ panels.
    Otherwise, as Darcy says, they are a pretty perfect bulletproof and proven design.
    Mine never had scoring, but the new machine does.
    I keep sharp blades and have never needed the scoring unit- even on the new saw.
    You should at least do yourself a favor and check out the local unit.
    You can see the amount of wear easily in the vee ways. You can also run slider to its furthest fore and aft position, and try to pick up on the ends.

  13. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    Darcy,

    Can you get the cast iron tables off that thing. Both the sliding table and the cast table to the right of the blade.
    Yes, everything comes off, everything is heavy.
    Had one from 71 and one from 75. The newer one had scoring blade.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Huntington, Vermont
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    There are too many Altendorfs and Martins around with the carriage in decent shape to bother with a funky one even if they give it to you.

    I have worked with two old Martins, a T75 and a T73 from the mid-80's, both really nice saws. The T75 is just as Peter says, bombproof with a stroke just long enough for 8" sheets, less sophisticated fences. The T73 is also a great saw, more likely to have a scoring saw and the longer stroke is an advantage. One weakness is lack of factory support for the hydraulic pump that raises and tilts the blade if it ever gives out. Either one or an F45 in good shape would be a lifetime saw in a one man shop. They can be had for under $10k. Add DRO's to the fences and you will be a happy man.

    The shop I used to work at traded in the T73 for a new T60C after a couple of bearing failures in the main motor and arbor made them nervous. Except for the left-hand rip adjustment/lock and the DRO's on the blade height/tilt and rip fence I don't see any improvement over the T73. The motorized blade control seems more of a liability than an improvement.
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 11-09-2018 at 8:06 AM.

  15. #45
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    If you're not dying to get something right now I would just wait around with money in hand for when something really really sweet pops up onto the market and get a older machine in good shape that does not need a total overhaul.

    A good machine can be brought back to life from years of abuse, but it's a long process.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

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