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Thread: Vintage Martin T75 restoration

  1. #1336
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    12
    Now a 10" slider would be interesting indeed! hehehe .... Something Inca might've made back in the day......

    But seriously, yes, it's a 123" table which might get close to a 10' cut, 118"?? Has the scoring as well...... so not sure how that would affect cut capacity.
    It appears that Martin "simply" grafted an extra couple of feet on their standard table. It's not a single 123" piece. It's very well done though, as you would expect from Martin.
    Here are a few really bad pics of when it was for sale in 2012, and getting shipped to me.






    Sadly, even if I had an inkling to sell, not sure you'd want to pay for the shipping for this beast!! I'm way up north in Canada at the other end of the continent, very close to Alaska.

    One thing that's a bit different on my saw is the way the bearing race is mounted for the sliding table. Mine has a piece of sheet metal welded to the two races, as can be seen in the pictures below.
    I don't know if this is stock. I'm thinking this was done by some previous owner, since I've never seen this on any other Martin T75's. Not sure if it's a good or bad thing.






    By the way, I was going through the plethora of pictures I've saved throughout this amazing thread, and was wondering if you ever re-installed these shims that you removed from under the bearing guides when you disassembled your saw?




    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    Did you say 10Ē slider!!!!!!!!!!!


    I didnít know Martin made a 10Ē T75 of this vintage.

    If you ever decide you want to sell that machine please please please give me first dibs.

    But you should finish it if you started.

    Iíd kill for that 10í table though..

  2. #1337
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,113
    Gustav,

    Youíd be surprised what Iíd be willing to do. Iím kinda into extremes. If you ever change your mind please donít forget me. Iíll send you a PM with my contact info. I fully plan to move at some point in the next 7-10 years. To be perfectly honest Iím thinking west, North or South Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, or yup you guessed it Alsaska. I want out of this hell hole metropolis. Point being when I leave no way I go any place without room for a serious shop.

    The connected race is interesting. Being it does not rub it looks well done if it was done by someone other than Martin. My bearing races rub a bit due to the felt being a bit worn. The noise is annoying, makes a machine that otherwise is ridding on a perfect set of rails seems wanky and cheap.The felts I made ended up to big. Iíll revisit the problem and replace they again with the proper size.

    I marked everyplace I have a shim when I tore down the machine. I put ever single one back. So thatís not it. You did give some pause to my mind regarding the v groove I had to repair. I canít see how but I wonder if the repair did not affect the relationship of the sliding carriage to the cast table. I suppose itís possible all be it highly unlikely as I was very very careful to put it back exactly as I found it. The bearing guides are just machined with strips of i suspect hardened steel glued in spaced by copper wire. So you know Iím not sure what I could do wrong there other than not glue the strip down evenly or with to much adhesive. I know this was not the case as I fully inspected my work after taking it out of clamps..

    But again you should sell me that saw. The huge cast table is just awesome. My favorite part of the 2002 T73 I have been using at work this last year had a huge table also. I fell in love with it for practice and romantic reasons. Funny most people had the opposite experience as I and hate that saw for being so large and taking up so much space.


    Quote Originally Posted by Gustav Gabor View Post
    Now a 10" slider would be interesting indeed! hehehe .... Something Inca might've made back in the day......

    But seriously, yes, it's a 123" table which might get close to a 10' cut, 118"?? Has the scoring as well...... so not sure how that would affect cut capacity.
    It appears that Martin "simply" grafted an extra couple of feet on their standard table. It's not a single 123" piece. It's very well done though, as you would expect from Martin.
    Here are a few really bad pics of when it was for sale in 2012, and getting shipped to me.






    Sadly, even if I had an inkling to sell, not sure you'd want to pay for the shipping for this beast!! I'm way up north in Canada at the other end of the continent, very close to Alaska.

    One thing that's a bit different on my saw is the way the bearing race is mounted for the sliding table. Mine has a piece of sheet metal welded to the two races, as can be seen in the pictures below.
    I don't know if this is stock. I'm thinking this was done by some previous owner, since I've never seen this on any other Martin T75's. Not sure if it's a good or bad thing.






    By the way, I was going through the plethora of pictures I've saved throughout this amazing thread, and was wondering if you ever re-installed these shims that you removed from under the bearing guides when you disassembled your saw?



  3. #1338
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    6,314
    Blog Entries
    7
    Patrick sent me the kick stop for a bit of work.



    The electrical box grommet was gone, I sourced a replacement. Sometimes these kind of things are extremely hard to find.



    Replaced the hardware



    Then attended to the button, the shank was snapped and someone repaired it with a wood screw.

    I bored out the back to receive a 20mm shaft. Made the shaft in graphite bronze. Oversized it to remove the slop from the spring. The spring was tumbled then refinished. The bolt is some kind of super stainless, I lapped the face bright.



    Next i honed the bore and installed.





    Also cleaned the wire.

    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  4. #1339
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,113
    What a Hack!

    Everyone keep their eyes peeled for whatís to come next. Brian and I are going to tend to the rebuilding the outrigger support arm. Currently and as designed originally and maybe noted previously it has some slop. This slop results in a bit of chatter. This chatter is compounded by one of the slots the support bar indexes into on my saw being previously damaged.

    This is gonna be like pimp my saw but in a tasteful manner that will go unrecognized to the average person. We are just going to adopt Martins current solution to the issue.

    When done the sliding carriage should travel like itís on buttered rails.

    Then underside of my broken cast.

    643A2C08-6384-48E4-8056-5B41D8357C75.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Patrick sent me the kick stop for a bit of work.



    The electrical box grommet was gone, I sourced a replacement. Sometimes these kind of things are extremely hard to find.



    Replaced the hardware



    Then attended to the button, the shank was snapped and someone repaired it with a wood screw.

    I bored out the back to receive a 20mm shaft. Made the shaft in graphite bronze. Oversized it to remove the slop from the spring. The spring was tumbled then refinished. The bolt is some kind of super stainless, I lapped the face bright.



    Next i honed the bore and installed.





    Also cleaned the wire.


  5. #1340
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,113
    And some proof I don’t just play with tools and never build anything. And possible the second to last kitchen I ever build. I doubt it though.

    I took a position making pipe organs. I am very very excited, as others here suggested when one door closes another opens. I am hopeful this will be the case. Only time will tell but I’m optimistic and excited for my future as a woodworker. I see this as a transition along with a step in the right direction for me as a individual being my interest largely lie in craftsmanship vrs just money. I began fine working never with the intent or motivation being solely $$$. My intention was deliberate and well considered. I was previously vocationally very unhappy and desiring a vocation that could both provide for me and one I could at least tolerate day to day. It’s been a journey for sure. At times brutal suffering and at times very very rewarding. I fully expect this will translate into pleasure vrs suffering.

    Cabinetry is fine and I am thankful for my time building cabinetry and who knows maybe I’ll return or maybe I’ll continue building cabinets on the side. I fully intend and hope to move toward more refined work with this new opportunity but I’m fully open to cabinet work. So anyone peering in keep me in mind I’m aligned with plenty of freight company and I’m not afraid to travel.

    E7945C03-5319-4CBB-B9FA-20ABFB2420C2.jpg

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    Island gets brass legs in the two corner recesses on the working side and at either corner on the bar side..

    8305C89C-6259-4F6C-AA94-9C3BB3CD8E9A.jpg

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    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 12-14-2019 at 12:20 PM.

  6. #1341
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,113
    This side has a matching dishwasher panel. And that missing drawer is missing as the drawer box was warped so we ordered another.

    E273650D-9A91-4C45-8A53-2C88A76E6BB7.jpg

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    820CA7AB-E18C-49A4-8A11-D8CEE9DA76F5.jpg

    And if you see something you don’t like or agree with don’t blame me I just build what I’m told. I also did not really do the instal. Just hung the doors and ran the toe kick..
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 12-14-2019 at 12:21 PM.

  7. #1342
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Huntington, Vermont
    Posts
    968
    Hey, Patrick, good for you making the move- hope it turns out well. I searched for "pipe organs New England" and found to my surprise there are quite a number of makers, including several in MA.

    I have really enjoyed this thread with its twists and turns. Though interested in properly functional gear I don't have the urge to make it look perfect, but I certainly appreciate what you have done with this saw.

  8. #1343
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,113
    This is how my shop started a lazy Saturday..

    40C98908-878E-479F-A57D-CB24186DD948.jpg

    A little reorganization..

    DD253FF9-4DB2-4E8B-9958-DF135C75CC15.jpg

    6A20E1CD-A1DA-4F19-B0D4-3DECA6C9CE51.jpg

    Then some demolition. Just a small wall but it reminded me how glad I am to not do residential construction type work any longer. The dust, bloody knuckles, splinters and bruises just stink..

    0CA4EAC9-9D9B-4231-AD1D-3E4EDD5BAAF0.jpg

    43B0CE5B-35D0-48FF-A0A4-A782DAEDF050.jpg

  9. #1344
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    2,113
    One more angle, so much more space.

    8E8730E9-69E5-4B5D-81A7-CDC64385E37A.jpg

    That pad in the middle of the floor goes next.

    The left side of the miter station will also be ripped out and reworked. Keeping in mind a phase perfect will need a home to the right of my electrical service. Got specs and the 10hp unit is 24x36Ē seems huge!

    Tomorrow Iíll clean up and the random outlets and wires that are all over the place.

    Also gonna rework the dust collection ducting.

    Iím not thrilled with the Inca and honestly just might sell it. I do like having a band saw with a small blade around.

    The wall I took down is not load bearing however it was situated right under one of two major support beans that span my house side to side and from to back forming a T..

    There had been a large check in this beam on the side that had no wall under it size the house was purchased 25 years ago. Taking down the wall exposed that that check runs the full length of the beam.

    Iím not overly concerned as that lally column carries the load of both beams where they meet at the t juncture. The plate to the lally column like 4x4 spans the two beams at the t juncture. I see this as totally insufficient. Not to mention in 1926 when my home was built there was no such thing as a hoist hanger.

    I have always wanted to get rid of that lally column always anticipating a living saw. My plan was structural steel cut into the foundation and bringing in a engineer to properly calculate loads blah blah. But being Iím gonna move in the next number of years I canít see going through all that.

    For now Iíll keep track with the 6x6 I put in place and make sure nothing moves one iota. If it does Iíll bring in a friend of mine thatís a framer and wiz with this stuff cans come up with a new plan.


    Side of beam, oxidation indicates to me itís been this way a long long time. Any fresh wood is a result of me tearing the top plate of the wall down.

    ED836888-1974-40B9-BB80-9860C7C2F31E.jpg

    Bottom of beam shows this is no small check. It travels the length of the beam like this splitting the right down the middle top to bottom. It does not show on both sides but itís pretty deep. Itís only on this one side it shows as cracked on the bottom also.

    0E0732E7-61C9-46F4-83C6-EA91EE505D4F.jpg

    And my kick stop home safe and sound. I hated shipping this through the mail. I came very close to not shipping it. The second project for the outrigger arm collaboration will be hand delivered.

    00AB5F2E-2F7A-4387-8EC4-AA70147CBCEC.jpg

    Now dinner..

  10. #1345
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    2,113
    Thanks Kevin I’m glad you are enjoying.

    I have also enjoyed the twists and turns. I like anything that takes a full commitment and complete dedication. This has been one of those projects. It would be so easy for a working guy to never get this machine back together and up and running.

    Yeah I was also shocked at the number of companies in New England building pipe organs. Who woulda thunk..

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    Hey, Patrick, good for you making the move- hope it turns out well. I searched for "pipe organs New England" and found to my surprise there are quite a number of makers, including several in MA.

    I have really enjoyed this thread with its twists and turns. Though interested in properly functional gear I don't have the urge to make it look perfect, but I certainly appreciate what you have done with this saw.
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 12-14-2019 at 9:25 PM.

  11. #1346
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    50,692
    That appears to be a very good decision to remove that small wall to open things up! Once that "tripping hazard" is gone from the floor, things will be just peachy!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #1347
    Congrats on the new gig, Patrick! Sounds much more aligned with your extraordinary skill and attention to detail.

    And while I've said this before, thank you - again - for putting so much effort into documenting this saw. I've just been loving coming here every day and watching a real master put such attention and detail into something. Inspiring in a way I can't even describe!

  13. #1348
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    50,692
    I missed the new gig news....that's an AWESOME opportunity to do something both different and skill building! Pipe organs are da bomb and having had the privilege of playing a few (very few, sadly) over my lifetime and they are amazing instruments
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #1349
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    542
    Congrats on the new job Patrick. You may get to play with a Maka and a supersurfacer, as these are some of the companies that use them.

  15. #1350
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
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    6,314
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    Nice work on that wall, Patrick! Glad the switch arrived safe and sound.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

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