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Thread: Vintage Martin T75 restoration

  1. #286
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    The kipp levers I would just replace, they’re inexpensive so plating will actually cost more.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  2. #287
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    These ones are all metal. The insides and everything. Can you get new ones that are 100% metal?

    If not I’ll plate, plus I like the idea of every nut and bolt being original if I can help it.

    But if I can get all metal ones maybe I can talk myself into it.

    By the way your fence looks sweet!

    How long dies it extend each direction?

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    The kipp levers I would just replace, they’re inexpensive so plating will actually cost more.

  3. #288
    I know McMaster has stainless ones. I just bought some zinc ones for a shaper fence.

  4. #289
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    Same as Martin does, I get them from McMaster. The metal ones are all metal as far as I know, they're Krupp brand IIRC.

    Sometimes I replace them with heavier duty 'steel' handles with the knob if they're for something I am going to put some leverage on all the time. That said I've never had a Krupp handle strip.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  5. #290
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    jwwinco.com. Nice stuff. Dave

  6. #291
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    David thanks for the link.

    I was trying to remeber the name of the provided link a few months ago when someone was asking me where I sourced parts for the air clamps I made. I could not remember for the life of me.

    Quote Originally Posted by David Kumm View Post
    jwwinco.com. Nice stuff. Dave

  7. #292
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    A bit more progress today.

    First pictures show the condition of the parts prior to stripping and soak in rust remover. Imop the saw is in pretty good shape considering itís age but in my minds eye tuff shape.it will clean up very very well though.

    D10BEF2C-A6B1-4131-843B-A80D80443566.jpg

    00C07020-0D4E-4A42-9FEB-3A2344E2A77E.jpg

    With everything in pieces they went into a five gallon bucket of laquer thinner while I put in my eight hours.

    Around lunch time I nocked off the paint with a wire brush and moved anything non aluminum to the rust remover soak.

    2965FB73-B56C-4D3E-8C96-806D8CCC5ABF.jpg

    I was not able to take one part of the rip fence apart due to a large strong snap ring. I need to order a set of snap ring pliers as I am finding them all over this machine.

    Yet again the laquer thinner just melts the paint off. Under it a heavy layer of what can only be high build primer and various fillers. The castings are really something to see as they are a mess everywhere but where it counts and filled and painted to look good. Well sometimes, many times they just left the rough castings and skipped the fill.

    All this stuff get one more soak so I can get the nooks and crannies I was unable to get at today due to my wore brushed being cooked.

    D1FA9C97-4F0B-4E29-ACA5-4C6C38E11F08.jpg

    2989B617-7085-4859-BFB2-BB67E3938218.jpg

    52ABD307-422B-436F-A95D-EB81AEE7E40A.jpg

    These are the bearings that the rip fence travels on. They index into the fence itself are fully adjustable and just a wonderful design. You would never see anything like this on a modern machine. Well thatís not true, one of the things that really impresses me when tearing this machine apart is how many design features from this original t-75 Martin still employed at least till 2002 when the t-73 i work on has. Actually even my brand new jointer has some of these features. Namely the bearings the fence rides on. In reality between the two saws so much is in common. Stuff like this really impresses me. Martin got it right the first time, felt no need to change something clearly perfect, the. Never cheeped out and did away with these features and very very high quality.

    C770F74B-1BEC-4CCD-BDA4-6995E81F07D7.jpg

    Iíll replace these bearings. Actually Iím going to replace every bearing on the machine even if they donít need it. I know nothing of how to size bearings when replacing. I once replaced the bearings on my drill press but I lifted the exact model numbers right off the the internet as itís a delta and a popular restoration.

    Anyone in the know that could chime in please do as I need guidance. I wonít to purchase only the best bearings made. I have zero concern with cost when replacing something that will last me the rest of its life. Plus after all this work and the machine being so nice to begin with the machine deserves the best regardless of if it needs them.

    Iím going to get these pieces put back togehter so I donít forget what is what. Once that is done Iíll have the outrigger table and the extrusion it rides on sand all the working parts associated ready for primer. Iíll also have the rip fence, the clamp, and all the odd and end stuff that just pulls off the machine with east ready for prime.

    The next step will be to remove the whole sliding carnage, completely break it down, diagnose what the weird noise is all about, prep for primer and reassemble. With that done Iíll remove the cast top and get into the guts of this project. Iíd say Iím a good month out on that though.

    Right now I need to get a good spray gun that can shoot a high build industrial metal primer. From there Iím not sure what Iíll use for finish. The paint supplier we use has anything I can think up. I guess they have some industrial coating for farm equipment that supposed to be good. Iím half consodering auto body paint?

    I think I might have taken 10 years off my life today. Between the mdf dust for a kitchens worth of full overlay slab style doors I cut with crap j]dust collection on the t-73, then being elbow deep in laquer thinner about 30 times. Ok elbow deep is exaggerating but I was just reaching into the bucket to get pieces as rubber gloves just melt. Then what I would imagine is plenty of lead paint dust sanding off the filler. Yum I canít wait to get sick and die because I was a idiot. A life spent as a tradesman and you just kinda accept chemical exposure and the idea it will get you or it wonít?

    Anyway more tomorrow but probably just re assembly.

  8. #293
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    Between the mdf dust for a kitchens worth of full overlay slab style doors I cut with crap dust collection on the t-73, then being elbow deep in laquer thinner about 30 times. Ok elbow deep is exaggerating but I was just reaching into the bucket to get pieces as rubber gloves just melt. Then what I would imagine is plenty of lead paint dust sanding off the filler. Yum I canít wait to get sick and die because I was a idiot. A life spent as a tradesman and you just kinda accept chemical exposure and the idea it will get you or it wonít?

    Anyway more tomorrow but probably just re assembly.
    Next time I do mdf doors, I'm cutting them on the router. Perfectly sized for banding, holes drilled, handled twice.

    I believe nitril holds up to lacquer thinner. It does not hold up against MEK or acetone though.

  9. #294
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    Most often the bearings have the number right on the side of them. I type that into McMaster and it will populate the sizing, from there I will chose the specs I want (shielded or sealed), ABEC rating, etc. The ones they have supplied to me have been mainly SKF.

    The bearings I pulled out of the Maka were FAG brand made by Schaeffler, my understanding is that these are very nice and probably very much top of the line.

    Those are really neat bearings for that fence.

    Those castings look beautiful to me, the castings on the Maka were very nice as well. Nice work on the cleanup.
    Last edited by Brian Holcombe; 01-18-2019 at 12:15 AM.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  10. #295
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    When you get to the bearings, pm me. Some don't need special quality but for some, the precision or particularly clearance are important. Dave

  11. #296
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    Just wanted to comment about castings. I've been on the user end of castings (as opposed to making them) and a good casting to me is dense and free of voids or defects where possible. It's more important than wether or not they have cleaned 100% of the casting flash or if the castings are perfect on the their rough surfaces (they won't be) so they're filled just like a car body is filled before being painted.

    You can go back with a grinder and remove the casting flash where it exists and clean up wavy lines. I regretted not doing that to one spot on the Maka where a line could have been hand ground straighter.

    I machined quite a few areas of the Maka original castings and the table was ground by the machinist I worked for, I found them to be fantastic and he agreed with my sentiment. That's much more important that raw aesthetic since the aesthetic is easy to touch up.

    More important still is to check the parts and their surfaces for accuracy, that's the true test of a good casting. if they stayed flat and true then you're going to have a fairly easy time reassembling.

    If you have a granite inspection plate (I think you do) then you can use that for a lot of things, especially smaller parts. Sometimes the best approach is not to go hunting for issues until they present themselves but other times it really is best to simply check everything and see if they're within a reasonable spec.

    There were some parts on the Maka that were just so far out of spec it was almost baffling to me how they got that bad without any obvious damage done, but most stuff was fine.
    Last edited by Brian Holcombe; 01-18-2019 at 1:09 PM.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  12. #297
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    Yeah cnc that would be something. Sadly that’s not gonna happen.

    Not that I’m heart broken but it is important the boss makes money if I wanna stay employed. I’m not much a fan of cnc taking over everything but you know I’d rather program a machine in sharp than runntrim on site anyway.

    Our problem is cash flow and being in a fourth floor shop that can’t handle the kind of weight of a cnc. Our rent is like $1200 a moth all utilities included for 2500sqft. We are not going anywhere unless we are forced to.

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Wasner View Post
    Next time I do mdf doors, I'm cutting them on the router. Perfectly sized for banding, holes drilled, handled twice.

    I believe nitril holds up to lacquer thinner. It does not hold up against MEK or acetone though.

  13. #298
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    I’m about there. At least fase numero uno...

    Quote Originally Posted by David Kumm View Post
    When you get to the bearings, pm me. Some don't need special quality but for some, the precision or particularly clearance are important. Dave

  14. #299
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    Brian,

    To be clear I was not complaining or being critical. More just voicing my revelation as I had no idea the pieces had such a high build primer and so much fill under the surface of the paint that was left.

    I don’t have a inspection plate but their project is inspiring a whole new list of tools I just gotta have lol..

    So let’s, wrenches, retaining ring pliers, a small arm of vintage buffing machines all setup with various wire wheels and polishing pads. These I really really would love. I purchase tools from Chris Vesper from time to time and I have noticed on his Instagram feed he a wall of pedestal buffers polishers and grinders. I have access to a polisher only and am dreaming of a couple machines with various wire wheels to really make quick work of these small parts vrs working them through the grits with sand paper.

    Anyway I gotta resist as I spend $$ hand over fist and I suspect these good times won’t last forever. At least when the bottom falls out I wanna be able to just take the work that comes, not worry and build all the things I have been putting off with all my free time. Then wait for the economy to boom again an go toll purchasing crazy all over again lol..



    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Just wanted to comment about castings. I've been on the user end of castings (as opposed to making them) and a good casting to me is dense and free of voids or defects where possible. It's more important than wether or not they have cleaned 100% of the casting flash or if the castings are perfect on the their rough surfaces (they won't be) so they're filled just like a car body is filled before being painted.

    You can go back with a grinder and remove the casting flash where it exists and clean up wavy lines. I regretted not doing that to one spot on the Maka where a line could have been hand ground straighter.

    I machined quite a few areas of the Maka original castings and the table was ground by the machinist I worked for, I found them to be fantastic and he agreed with my sentiment. That's much more important that raw aesthetic since the aesthetic is easy to touch up.

    More important still is to check the parts and their surfaces for accuracy, that's the true test of a good casting. if they stayed flat and true then you're going to have a fairly easy time reassembling.

    If you have a granite inspection plate (I think you do) then you can use that for a lot of things, especially smaller parts. Sometimes the best approach is not to go hunting for issues until they present themselves but other times it really is best to simply check everything and see if they're within a reasonable spec.

    There were some parts on the Maka that were just so far out of spec it was almost baffling to me how they got that bad without any obvious damage done, but most stuff was fine.

  15. #300
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    You’ll probably need pin wrenches as well, I’m sure they’re using them somewhere.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

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