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Thread: Vintage Martin T75 restoration

  1. #1426
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    2,458
    Iíll say it again it took the whole village.

    Pretty much all I brought to the table was the insistence for perfection in both fit and finish. Well then a poop tin of elbow grease and a unlimited bank account and willingness to just take itís a slow as getting it perfect took.

    But itís the rest of you that showed me where and how..

    So thank you all!

    And Iím not done

  2. #1427
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Buck Lake, Alberta
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    179
    Quote Originally Posted by mreza Salav View Post
    This is an amazing job all around by both Patrick and Brian. Jaw dropping...
    I couldn’t agree more.
    Very impressive. I’m really enjoying this.

  3. #1428
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Austin Texas
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    1,704
    "Holcombe Welding Co"?
    David

  4. #1429
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Coastal Southern Maine
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    259
    Your knowledge and skills are amazing to see. This thread is inspiring.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Thought you guys may enjoy some process pictures. The bearing is an 'Angular contact' bearing, double row rated for thrust. My first task was to bore a hole in the aluminum block and press in the bearing.

    Attachment 426647

    Next I had to square the sides of the shaft, followed by boring holes to receive heavy shoulder bolts. I wanted a piston fit on these so that they could act similarly to pins. The shaft is 303 stainless that I had custom made for this project. The attachment point to the end of the outrigger was the difficult part in all of this. I sourced weld nuts which would receive the shouldered bolts. These have a protruding boss which was able to engage a receiver. To keep them from moving as they were tacked up I decided the boss would need to be installed in a bored hole (exact size), and further restricted by being seated in a groove the exact width from flat to flat. The shouldered bolts are 316 stainless. The shaft, jam nut (316 stainless) and bolts will never rust.

    Attachment 426648

    Attachment 426649

    Attachment 426650

    Once Patrick arrived with parts in hand we began the work by setting up the outrigger table on the Bridgeport. The goal was to remove the cast boss which was damaged and unable to properly retain the shaft. As originally designed, it left much to be desired in terms of precision and ease of movement. The design was that of a steel shaft plugged into an aluminum hole and intended to rotate without easily accessible grease or oiling points (you'd have to take it apart to grease it).

    Attachment 426651

    What I did not expect was that the boss was slightly offset from the center of the outrigger support. My bearing would not allow for much offset, though I did offset it slightly once I was aware of this. We discussed that effect of moving it closer to center and recognized rapidly that it would affect the clearance when the outrigger was at its smallest position. Patrick had a great number of reference photos, so we had good information to work with, knowing what clearance was left there and giving us the ability to make reasonable assumptions on what course of action would be successful.

    I milled up a receiver for the aluminum bearing block. The fit between receiver and block are exactly precise. Holes were bored for the bolts and bolt holes tapped in the outrigger table.

    Attachment 426652

    My theory in this has been, when in doubt...go heavy! As example, the bearing is rated for 2650lbs static load. I also wanted to use a ball bearing due to the fact that it would eliminate the clearance necessary between a plain bearing and a shaft.

    Next up the outrigger arm was trimmed to remove the original attachment.

    Attachment 426653

    The plate welded by way of tacking, checking, adjusting, adding more tacks, checking, adjusting. This was a long process but the results were good, square to the machined surface on the bottom of the outrigger tube.

    Attachment 426654

    The bearing and shaft were joined using a retaining compound rather than a press fit. This is easier on the bearing for sure, the retaining compound is loctite 680 and once it cures the connection is rock solid. It has 4000 psi shear strength.

    Finally the outrigger support had to be trimmed back to allow clearance for the shaft, given the smaller offset between parts. I didn't photograph this part, however. Patrick took some great photos of the finished result so I didn't take any there either.

  5. #1430
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    I made the foolish mistake of asking Brian where he learnt so much about so many things. Pretty much anything pertaining to fine fine Woodworking, metal, machine work, welding, bearings steel grades bolt grades you name it he knows. Crap I had no idea what a boss was. I thought that was the guy whom I hope pays me come Friday.

    His answer was simply “I don’t know research” my though that I didn’t share at the time was “well that’s great but you first have to know the question to ask when looking for a answer”.

    So you know you kinda gotta know something to learn something. I did figure out Brian’s dad was a metal worker but still and again you gotta know the the question to ask and have the desire for the answer. Without desire, interest your no place.

    This whole thing has taken a swing and tone way to much seriousness for me. I’m a meat headed prankster ass clown at heart. If not for my need for perfection I wouldn’t have a serious bone in my body. Thank god for my need for perfection as it has taught me how to focus like a laser and never ever settle. Like never and for anything.

    I appreciate all the compliments but at the end of the day it’s just a saw and I’m totally not that smart or worthy of all the compliments. Talented well I’ll take talented I do think I talented. I’m also head strong like a bull and willing to suffer for the things I want 100% for sure. This machine if nothing has been a exercise in suffering and commitment.

  6. #1431
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    2,458
    Jesus mark coming from you well that means something.

    If I end up north again at some point I’d love the opportunity to meet you. The seller of the T2e told me he knows you and that you lived like 30 minutes from where I was. Wish I had known prior.

    I highly doubt Martin would do so as I made to many changes to the machine from the factory original. In all honestly I kinda regret that now but only because I respect factory original. I actually like what I have done with the machine more than from the factory but ethically I have come to not agree with it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hennebury View Post
    Incredible job Patrick, what a fine looking machine, you have made it into a museum piece. I wouldn't be surprised if Martin offered to buy it from you for their museum.

    Nice work Brian.

  7. #1432
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    N. Texas
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    1,500
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    I’ll say it again it took the whole village.

    Pretty much all I brought to the table was the insistence for perfection in both fit and finish. Well then a poop tin of elbow grease and a unlimited bank account and willingness to just take it’s a slow as getting it perfect took.

    But it’s the rest of you that showed me where and how..

    So thank you all!

    And I’m not done
    "The work recommends the Craftsman."

    (And why I tease you about sucking up all the available 'perfection'. One more like you and Brian in the same room and the situation could have gone super-critical; all hope of quality work from me would just evaporate. )
    Last edited by Malcolm McLeod; 02-24-2020 at 8:04 PM.
    Molann an obair an saor.

    If Heaven ain't alot like Texas, I don't wanna go. - Hank Jr.

  8. #1433
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    2,458
    If Brian were a woman I’d surely court him.

    Hard working, smart, talented perfectionist. What’s not to love, pretty sure his wife must feel the same way or she surely would had murdered him by now. All those sharp tools he keeps yah know.

    But then yes the two of us would implode getting trapped in a cosmic time warp pursuing meteorological perfection and vaporize into ether.

    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm McLeod View Post
    "The work recommends the Craftsman."

    (And why I tease you about sucking up all the available 'perfection'. One more in the like you and Brian in the same room and the situation could have gone super-critical; all hope of quality work from me would just evaporate. )

  9. #1434
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    6,378
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    7
    Hah! In many ways it’s amazing that she puts up will all this.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  10. #1435
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
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    I imagine that is probably the truth.

    I think itís amazing anyone whom puts up with a guy like you or I as in all honestly and sadly itís just that.

    Putting up with vrs appreciating or respect but you know I get it must be highly annoying to the average non type A good enough is good enough or the dreaded itís just wood lol..
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 02-25-2020 at 8:40 AM.

  11. #1436
    Patrick
    Very nice work on the t75 better than new. Can you tell me the largest diameter blade that will fall below the table? I have an early 1980's T 75 arriving shortly. I have used Forrest blades for 30 years. I contacted Tony at Forrest and they do not have any 1 1/4" bore blades and would have to bore a 1" out. Before I have them do that, it would be non returnable at that point, I would like to know the max diameter that will fall below the table.
    The saw is complete minus the crank that adjusts the position of the slider forward and back. I contacted Martin in Germany and they have the handle. However, they want a LOT for it. would you be willing to keep an eye out for this part?
    The main motor needs bearings and that will be the first thing that gets done. I will inspect and R/R only what it needs to make it new mechanically. There may be some cosmetic things that need may need attention but for the most part I will leave the worn used but not abused look to the older machinery. With that said what you did to your saw is not even close to being possible in my situation and Yes I would prefer that over a vintage looking machine really unbelievable that you were able to hang in there and log all the hours to get it done at such a high level.
    Fritz

  12. #1437
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,458
    Fredrick,

    I wish I could answer your question. I believe 16 is the max size it will hole but I can’t say if it falls all the way under the table as my saw is still not up and running.

    I’m awaiting the handwheel back from the plater to make the final assembly.

    Doing what I did takes a special person for sure and that I am lol.

    Currently I’m knee deep in a t23 shaper with a bad pump to the oil lubriacred bearings vrs most machines greased bearings. As a result the machine ran dry for god knows how long and ever bearing on the machine was in need of replacement and the whole oil delivery system pretty much rebuilt and as a result of antiquated technology regarding pumps and thus availability a redesign.

    These old machines are a slippery slope and from what I’m learning take a full commitment with regards to both time and money. But if you can keep your head down and committed to the end goal they are worth all of the effort and resources.

    When I know about the blade you will know. t this point who the hell knows when I’ll ever see my part again..

    Enjoy and good luck!

  13. #1438
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    911
    I know the old T75 will take a 18” slightly minus blade. I kept one from mine and use it occasionally on the T72. It’s a real screamer even on the lower speed and only use it when needed. I generally run 14” in mine. 12” is good if only doing cabinetry. My recently acquired T17 won’t bury a 14” blade but the T75 would.
    18” is the limit for the T17. The T72 will take a 20” blade!

  14. #1439
    Thanks for the replies guys I will get the largest blade I can for the saw that will still go below the table. Should have it assembled next week while the motor is being rebuilt. Going to run oil lines and a manual pump next week too.

    Will let you know the progress. If either of you come across a crank handle or have the ability to CMM one I would pay you for the cad file and make a model to have one cast
    Fritz

  15. #1440
    Patrick,
    You having your hand wheel chrome plated? I have had plating work done in the past and it was usually 2 week turnaround. Are you having something out of the ordinary done? Custom Automotive plating shops did a good enough job for my needs. Hope you get it back soon so you can get your saw making furniture. Would like to see your video of your saw when complete

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