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Thread: Vintage Martin T75 restoration

  1. #1456
    Got down the the shop first light today. Ran the wiring with a drop cord out of the ceiling. Moved the saw to the approximate location then wired it.Ran new oil lines, put the motor with the new bearings back in the saw. Before I put the top back on a let way oil seep down all sides of the guides until there was a few drops on the floor to assure there was adequate lubrication.Greased the spindle journals and I could see fresh grease so I dont think it was ever neglected . Turned the hand wheel( not as nice looking as Patrick/s) the rise and fall is super easy and not a sound. There is a bit of groaning coming from the spring assist. Would like to get that stopped. Mounted the main table and auxiliary top. Then mounted the slider on the saw to get everything settled in. Always a little anxious but i hit the start button and if fired right up! I runs very smooth and quiet,makes less noise than the 20 hp phase converter that powers it. So far so good.

    When looking at the photos before I bought the saw, I thought the crank handle and the chain mechanism under the slider was to position the sliding table front to back depending on how you intend to use the saw. Now I am not sure? I did not spend any time studying it further need to have something to eat. If that is what it if for I am not getting it.

    I may go back down after dinner to mount the main fence, outrigger and support arm. Will post a few photos if I do

  2. #1457
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Williamstown,ma
    Posts
    991
    Chain and crank move the slider away from main table to allow dado setups IF you have the dado extension piece.
    Moving the slider beam fore and aft is done by loosening the clamps and pushing or pulling it manually.

  3. #1458
    Quote Originally Posted by peter gagliardi View Post
    Chain and crank move the slider away from main table to allow dado setups IF you have the dado extension piece.
    Moving the slider beam fore and aft is done by loosening the clamps and pushing or pulling it manually.

    Thank you Peter,
    I did not play with anymore tonight that will save a little time not having to explore things tomorrow. Do you have a t75?

  4. #1459
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,277
    I like those feeties!!! The curves of the machine plus those clear, space-age feet bring a George Jetson feel to me here. It's like it's hovering in your shop. Seriously, I love it!

    Bummer on the wheels. Your machine. Get it the way you want it. If you're going to scowl every time you look at the wheels they way they are, well....that's not a good thing because it's going to DISTRACT YOU and that's a safety issue. Yes, they are nice and shiny. But if they are not to the standard you want them, reiterate the requirements to the vendor.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #1460
    Yeah the curves are really something. The t23 shaper is the same from the right angle. The fresh paint helps bring attention to it along with the mountain of body filler.

    Even my t54 has awesome lines from the right angle.

    F0021954-298B-4D22-9921-D5D8B11065ED.jpg


    The jets is might have been one of my favorite, well that Leave it to Bever, Casper the friendly Ghost, I Dream of Jeanny ďyeah that was my favoriteĒ lol..

    I have had a light set in the base of the machines when Iím working on them. When you step away it looks like ground effects on silly car. I have to admit it lolls very near but I canít be that tacky after all I really do use these machines for actually work. I like do like to look at them Iíll admit.

    Iíd like to nickle plate the feet but you know. They are stainless so I could polish them but without a buffing wheel itís just to much he work. Maybe during the next pandemic if donít have another machine to repair I need running,,

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I like those feeties!!! The curves of the machine plus those clear, space-age feet bring a George Jetson feel to me here. It's like it's hovering in your shop. Seriously, I love it!

    Bummer on the wheels. Your machine. Get it the way you want it. If you're going to scowl every time you look at the wheels they way they are, well....that's not a good thing because it's going to DISTRACT YOU and that's a safety issue. Yes, they are nice and shiny. But if they are not to the standard you want them, reiterate the requirements to the vendor.

  6. #1461
    Gonna have to re position the saw after a couple of dust fittings arrive. Got it to where the current available sections would take it. It sits about 10 inches too close to my jointer. The Forrest blade should be here in the morning. Have not cut too much on it with the Tenryu ripping blade that I bought in case Forrest could not deliver for a while. I have heard some pretty good things about Tenryu but this blade is no good. it was their Industrial series, a mid priced blade. There is .012" run out top to bottom and I know it is not coming from the saw.

    What can you get as a max cross cut on the T75" with an 8 foot slider? Looks like I can get about 70 inches with the slider mounted all the way back. Does that sound about right?thumbnail (6).jpgthumbnail (7).jpgthumbnail (4).jpgthumbnail (9).jpgthumbnail (9).jpg

  7. #1462
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,478
    I think crosscut is closer to 100" if the sub base is in the right position. Dave

  8. #1463
    94.75 with the little mounting block that is 1” and my 3” 2..75 felder fence. Less with the original Martin as it’s 3” even so 94.5.

    Seems so stupid it’s sub 96 but I know it won’t stop me from straight lining a full sheet as hand pressure is all that’s needed. Lop a 1” or so to square two sides and your good. Still seems stupid and makes a youngish like me think sheet stock was less than 96-97 back when they made these saws?

    I know they made a 10hp table also but what point would these saws serve vrs the short stroke or the t17. I get it more than the t17 and less than a 10’ slider but it does seem dumb.

    At some point I’ll fabricate up table extensions for my clamps in place of the handles at either end. I’ll make them go largely look the same but also maybe even oil the guideways like the modern machine does at the leading edge.

    I have not looked at your photos yet as I only logged int to respond.

    I was just thinking late today “ hmmmm what happens to that guy with the T75” must run into problems lol as I know when I sto- posting it’s normally some kinda curve ball.

  9. #1464
    You do know your leading edge crosscut fence is on wrong right.

    The original “yours is” but it’s kidding the wood that would be bolted to the bottom. You have the bottom facing you if your pushing the saw..

    Maybe I’m seeing wrong but I don’t think so.

    I can go take a picture of my original of you like.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrick Dornan View Post
    Gonna have to re position the saw after a couple of dust fittings arrive. Got it to where the current available sections would take it. It sits about 10 inches too close to my jointer. The Forrest blade should be here in the morning. Have not cut too much on it with the Tenryu ripping blade that I bought in case Forrest could not deliver for a while. I have heard some pretty good things about Tenryu but this blade is no good. it was their Industrial series, a mid priced blade. There is .012" run out top to bottom and I know it is not coming from the saw.

    What can you get as a max cross cut on the T75" with an 8 foot slider? Looks like I can get about 70 inches with the slider mounted all the way back. Does that sound about right?thumbnail (6).jpgthumbnail (7).jpgthumbnail (4).jpgthumbnail (9).jpgthumbnail (9).jpg

  10. #1465
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrick Dornan View Post
    Gonna have to re position the saw after a couple of dust fittings arrive. Got it to where the current available sections would take it. It sits about 10 inches too close to my jointer. The Forrest blade should be here in the morning. Have not cut too much on it with the Tenryu ripping blade that I bought in case Forrest could not deliver for a while. I have heard some pretty good things about Tenryu but this blade is no good. it was their Industrial series, a mid priced blade. There is .012" run out top to bottom and I know it is not coming from the saw.

    What can you get as a max cross cut on the T75" with an 8 foot slider? Looks like I can get about 70 inches with the slider mounted all the way back. Does that sound about right?thumbnail (6).jpgthumbnail (7).jpgthumbnail (4).jpgthumbnail (9).jpgthumbnail (9).jpg
    You should be able to get about 98" with a 10" blade, the beam in the correct position and the support arm in the correct spot on the saw.

    https://youtu.be/K6FTNzdFB0I

  11. #1466
    Yes I realized that yesterday and have the kindling wood on the bottom with the tape scale angled toward me. The flag stop would not flip into position the way I had it mounted... first thought was that the stops were not the right ones HA! thank you for the observation.
    Yea something is not right. Could not sit still so I went down to the shop to look things over. There is a retainer bar that runs the partial length of the cast sub base just below the top that is positioned at a distance inset from both ends. As you move the slider the retainer bar follows the bottom portion the top at about half the distance the top travels. This bar also appears to act as the stop point when the stop tap fixed to the sliding top comes in contact with it as the table is moved forward and backward. When the table is moved forward the rear stop tab comes in contact with the retainer bar and makes a positive stop. At this point the bar is 15 inches from the end cap on the iron sub base on the far side of the saw.When the slide is pulled back the follower bar hits the end cap on the back(hand wheel) side of the saw causing the slide to stop. Yet the stop tab is 15 inched from the end of the bar.....so if the stop were to come in contact with the bar as it does going forward there should be about 30 more inches of travel? Making it 100 ish inches of travel.
    One of 2 things. At some point the base was removed from the top and the retainer bar was not positioned properly, or it has moved somehow. Any help that could be given on adjusting the position this retainer bar is sincerely appreciated. If the assembly needs to be taken apart and put back together properly how too's would be also gratefully accepted! OR if I have things completely wrong that would be good to know too!

    Oh the way I knew it was a retainer bar is that I carefully slid the top back so the bar was past the removed end cap and Boouuing a ball bearing hit me on the chin!.

  12. #1467
    Darcy,
    Thanks for the link Nice original looking saw. You had it a while?
    Fritz

  13. #1468
    Notice a few other things.

    Looks like your saw also had something done to the outrigger sport arm.

    Based on my saw and all that went into resolving the problem “largely figuring out the cause and working backwards” namely I think slop on the articulating arm and no greased pivot points. It seems to me maybe “it will be interesting to see over the years as more share their vintage t75’s if most have some kind of wear, repairs or just something broken regarding this aspect of the machines design.

    I suspect that will be the case as I have heard of at least one if not two other owners with the same problem. Most just let it go with a quick dirty fix unlike my overtop hopefully permanent fix.

    I also notice your rip fence has the “non L shaped extrusion” being all the saws I have seen to date have the “L shaped fence” I was wondering if mine had been altered. It looks like my answer is no.

    You also have the extrusion for the miter garage. Sadly I’m missing that and didn’t even know one existed.

    As for the stops under the table I can’t really say other than what I found when I fully pulled my machine apart.

    As I think you figured out the bearings are captured by a large race both top and bottom. Each race is nothing more than a piece of like 3/16 steel flat stock with holes drilled in it for the bearings to be captured. At either end and the middle there are felts that clean and oil the tracks.

    I don’t know about a stop other than these races. I know mine can travel back and forth all the way to the front of the top mounted and bottom mounted rails. So like when I get to the off the stroke generally I can budge/nudge/push the table forward a bit if going toward the leading edge or badge/pull back if pulling toward the operators side. I have found that with my saw that allows me to get a additional amount in front today the aide or behind the blade depending on where he races have seated in use.

    Hope that helps but I suspect it ay just confuse you more. Or maybe you will teach me something?


    .
    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    You should be able to get about 98" with a 10" blade, the beam in the correct position and the support arm in the correct spot on the saw.

    https://youtu.be/K6FTNzdFB0I

  14. #1469
    Yes the outrigger support rod is captured in a homemade wooden support.Even with this support the arm brace the arm wants to jump about. I clamped it the the upper frame and that stopped it. So now I removed it shimmed the rot top and bottom and it works fine. Will have a proper arm machined with replaceable bushings.
    I spoke with Martin and they said that there were slight changes to the saw every few years such as the main table fence I too was thinking mine was not original it is the only one like it that I have seen.

    As far as the races go do you know how I would position them forward with it assembled?


    IF I have to take apart what am I in for? Do you recall if there was more that one way,or position to assemble the races? To me that need to mount forward from where they are

    Sorry for all the questions just kinda anxious about taking the slider off and disassembling it if that is what needs to be done.

  15. #1470
    I’ll try and get a video later but I have no idea how to post one here. I think I have to host it someplace else and I should kinda be in a hockey helmet when online.

    But “DONT TAKE THE SLIDING TABLE APART” unless you absolutely have to. The only reason I would after doing it is if something where broken.

    As I understand it after having it apart is the combination of the half mood end caps and the little steel “things Bolger two per side” that capture the bearings and races and acts as stops.

    So say the sliding table is 8’ and the races top and bottom equal length but say 36” and fully independent of each other top to bottom. Those races can move around the full 8’ length of the top and bottom table and pretty much they land where they land and only stop when they need to based on the half moon stops and little silver brackets.

    Let’s see if I have a picture of the half moon stops and metal brackets?

    9623BA30-0B93-423A-AB91-5116AAD49EF1.jpg

    There you go. Those two things “half moon plate and metal brackets are all that capture the top and bottom race. The races just travel around I. The upper and bottom guideway falling wherever they feel like falling. I’m not aware of any limit rod or bars other than these stops.

    Taking the table apart is easy. Getting it back together is a royal pita and requires a few guys or gantry some ingenuity and probably a second set of hands.

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