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Thread: Vintage Martin T75 restoration

  1. #1066
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Yeah I know what you mean, its one of the reasons I'm still working for myself. Pretty sure I could make more money just showing up at a shop and doing an 8 hour day. But I like the variety of work I get to do. I also like the challenge of figuring out how to do the unusual projects.

    As for the flooring.... yep this is the second batch and there will likely be more. This is one of the only companies in the country that does end grain flooring. So whether your in the Museum of Science in Boston, or some hotel lobby in Houston, if you look down and see end grain flooring it's most likely from them. They have a ton of choices, but this happens to be one that is engineered strips vs individual blocks, and only made in a certain sizes. Some designers prefer it another way.... basically think of it as the difference between using a 7" square tile vs 3" x 7" subway tiles. The factory makes what they make and are not interested in doing anything else..... hence they need someone to step in and 're-manufacture' the product. So in the end, they make money, I make money, and it keeps the designers happy!

  2. #1067
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    I’m gonna subtitle this entry,

    WAR......

    Holy crap that was seriously hard. At times just scary, but it’s done kinda. I gotta get the largest portion of my toolbox out of my van still.

    I ended up renting a small open U-haul trailer. I don’t have pictures of it loaded but I was able to use the forklift at work to load the saw base and my toolboxes onto the trailer and into my van.

    Sadly on my way home my snap on box on caster that I had strapped down cut loose and put a good dent in the passengers sliding door of my month old $66k Mercedes sprinter. It seems the majority of the damage is where a window that I dint have in the sliding door but intent to instal will go. Well at least on the outside. Inside the van it’s pretty nasty. I guess I’ll be putting that window in sooner than I thought and off tot the body shop it goes to have the inside repaired. I can’t make a payment on such a expensive van that’s only a month old and look at the dam dent everyday.

    Van loaded pre dent..

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    So I gotta make it down this path and around the corner to the right with everything.

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    Saw safely in the back yard. Now I gotta figure out how the heck to get it on that platform. The pallet jacks come up a few if not more inches short. At this point I’m completely on my own. I’m kinda scared at this point as I really was not sure what I was gonna do and if it would go. I know this though, I have move so many heavy machines myself both into my shop and at work to know I’ll figure it out.

    F3F06B6D-A73D-4BDF-AB40-EF88D980636A.jpg

  3. #1068
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    Feb 2015
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    The car jack and a second pallet jack. Yup I own two pallet jacks. Who would think a guy in a pink bungalow would own two pallet jacks. One I purchased when I purchased my Felder stuff. The second one I purchased when I got my Martin jointer as it requires long forks. I was happy today to own both as I wouldnít had gotten this done without it.

    28BC4F62-ABF8-4807-AE75-3E4F7055CF96.jpg

    A good twenty minutes later itís up. Pretty sure my neighbors think Iím nuts.

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    Heading up pallet jack under the machine again. Kinda scary as it wanted to roll backward off the ramp and crush me. I ended up screwing a block to the ramp so it couldnít.

    B6D50BBD-6862-42DC-B6D4-386D5EEA95A2.jpg

    This is the real scary part. Now I gotta get the machine up over that edge. With the pallet jack or a pallet with long skids it levers and teaters on edge pretty bad. At some point you just have to come ove the edge and pray. I screw blocking to the ramp ever foot or so on the way down but you know the machine could easily fall off the edge of the ramp. Sadly the pallet was slightly wider than my ramp if I was to screw pieces to the side so it couldnít fall off. Plus the machine is weighted to the right side on its way done wanting to fall off the ramp and crush me and my washer and dryer. I think I screw 2x4ís about ten times across the ramp releasing them one at a time. Everytime it was a huge Hail Mary! The machine wanted to fall off the right in the worst way and almost did more than once.

    Pic bellow give you a idea how wide my ramp is vrs the pallet. If the machine shifted left or right the slightest it wanted to Cruze off the ramp. This base is crazy heavy, like real heavy. When I cut a 2x4 loose I had no say Iím what happened if it did want to go over the edge. I sure couldnít stop it i]even in like six inches or Iíd get crushed.


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    Barley fit through the door.

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  4. #1069
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    Almost done and my nerves totally shot and my body beat to crap. At this point it’s 4pm and I had been at it since 8:30 this morning.

    Just before this I had most lost the machine like three times in a row. I ended u- using a bunch of that Birdseye maple to the right to make a sub ramp in a panic when the machine started falling to the right.

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    My friend the pallet jack back in action. At this point I know disaster will not strike and I’ve made it.

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    Safe in my shop.

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  5. #1070
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    Toolboxes. Well two of three parts. The hard part tomorrow.

    8DF79BD4-99FE-4699-BB29-438F2423034F.jpg

    Couldn’t wait to unwrap her.

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    Makes that Felder look like a Felder lol..

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    And now messaging. I’m totally knackered!ni couldn’t live without Aleve or Red Bull.

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    More to come tomorrow. Then I gotta put my dam mess of a shop back together so I can get to building this saw.

  6. #1071
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
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    519
    Ya gotta love crazy people... they are so much more entertaining. Well done Patrick! I had a good chuckle... been i similar situations quite a few times. Once I had to lower a 24" old German jointer through a hole into a basement, with a rented chainhoist....that had the idler wheel missing, you know that little wheel that keeps the chain on the big chainwheel. Started lowering the jointer down through the hole i had cut in the floor, when the chain jumped off the chainwheel and then back on, it only jumped a few links, but the jointer dropped a few inches then stopped, scared the crap out of me and shook the house. Its scary fun moving big equipment. I got pinned under one once, when it fell over on me, my wife had to use an eight foot 2x4 to lever it off so i could get free. So i am enjoying your adventure a lot.

    this is the way to move heavy equipment. Air bearings on a polished concrete floor.


  7. #1072
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    Aug 2013
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    Princeton, NJ
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    Well done Patrick. Personally I think a fixed point and a come-along or a winch would have been a nice safety feature.

    That saw looks fantastic!

    I moved that mortiser in recently and wow even 700lbs can be pretty tough to swing around in a tight space, the saw probably gave you pause from time to time!
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  8. #1073
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    Feb 2015
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    Well mark, you know thatís great and all but.....

    Iíll still have to do this one more time to get a giant compressor into my shop.

    Then my guess is sell that sweet new van for some air skates. Then I still gotta go down hill.

    But you know Iím, but it is the first thing I thought lol

    But I have a plan for next time. Or at least to get the stuff out..

    Hydraulic lift tables, one outside one inside. Expensive, probably but maybe not on Craigslist is I buy them when I see them. Come to find out my uncle had one at work i could had used. That sits 4Ē off the ground when fully lowered.

    I canít imagine after this getting my 2800lb jointer into my shop down that ramp. Seems like it would be asking for a disaster. It will either sit in storage till i move or the lift tables will have to be purchased. If I do bring it in Iíll also be bringing in a brand new Martin jointer to go with it. Or maybe a old one fully restored as I kinda have a hankering for one of them. Iíll have to get a second shaper in at some point also.

    The shaper Iím not worried about. The jointer do to size, shape and weight has me shaking in my pants.

    Iím glad Iím entertaining you. I find it hard to believe with the moves Iím sure you have made that I could but I believe you.

    I am the rare creature that the harder I have to work for something the more sacrifice I have to make the more I enjoy it. I never enjoy anything easy even a nap sadly..



    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hennebury View Post
    Ya gotta love crazy people... they are so much more entertaining. Well done Patrick! I had a good chuckle... been i similar situations quite a few times. Once I had to lower a 24" old German jointer through a hole into a basement, with a rented chainhoist....that had the idler wheel missing, you know that little wheel that keeps the chain on the big chainwheel. Started lowering the jointer down through the hole i had cut in the floor, when the chain jumped off the chainwheel and then back on, it only jumped a few links, but the jointer dropped a few inches then stopped, scared the crap out of me and shook the house. Its scary fun moving big equipment. I got pinned under one once, when it fell over on me, my wife had to use an eight foot 2x4 to lever it off so i could get free. So i am enjoying your adventure a lot.

    this is the way to move heavy equipment. Air bearings on a polished concrete floor.


  9. #1074
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Beantown
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    Oh it did. When I say I almost lost it like 3-5 times in the 30 minutes it took to get down the ramp I mean it. I was pretty sure the day was gonna end on a very sour note.

    No place for a fixed anchor point up stream in my prized garden. But yes I have thought of that many times. I do have some unistrut lagged into my foundation on the far wall of my shop. My first big move in I thought I might need it to pull the machine into the shop. Pretty funny being I quickly learnt even a measly 500lb machine wants to fall right down that ramp. Start pushing a couple thousand lbsish like my jointer planer and it gets scary without as you suggested a anchor point upstream.

    Not sure what Iíll do next time and in the case of the jointer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Well done Patrick. Personally I think a fixed point and a come-along or a winch would have been a nice safety feature.

    That saw looks fantastic!

    I moved that mortiser in recently and wow even 700lbs can be pretty tough to swing around in a tight space, the saw probably gave you pause from time to time!

  10. #1075
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
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    519
    Patrick, moving big heavy machines gets you thinking, makes your mind work, its a challenge, There is always a way that you can do it, you just have to analyze and calculate a bit, and have faith. You strike me as that kind of a guy. Looking forward to seeing that saw together. If you don't have an anchor point, put a bar across the door-frame. There is always a way.

  11. #1076
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    I know you really prefer to be self-sufficient, but there are certainly times when using an expert resource might be worth the money to keep from killing yourself... So another option for moving in the truly heavy stuff is to hire a rigger. "It's what they do"
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #1077
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
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    Hi Jim, I had to pick-up a granite surface plate from the city 50 miles away it was 48" x 96" by 14" thick on a steel base and weighs 6 or 7000 lbs I called a heavy equipment moving company, the same one that the government had hired to bring the surface plate to the warehouse a few weeks earlier. The quoted me $3500. I hired a flatbed truck and driver from the steelworks down the road from me, we went in and loaded it and brought it my place. i hired a forklift and driver from the farm supply company up the road from me to offload it. About four hours work and All in it cost me $400. I have hired many riggers over the years, some are worth their weight in gold and some of them are out for your gold. You have to be really careful explaining to riggers what you want, they may just throw a chain over you nice paintwork, or bend or crush a couple of parts. I have seen guys with forklifts lift machines up by delicate precision machined parts, that cannot be treated that way. They can do a lot of damage, and that to me is extremely stressful, far more than me doing the job, if it is "reasonable" for me to do so. Lets face it, no one is going to be more careful moving this saw than Patrick.
    But you have to weigh up the situation and make the best decision.




    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I know you really prefer to be self-sufficient, but there are certainly times when using an expert resource might be worth the money to keep from killing yourself... So another option for moving in the truly heavy stuff is to hire a rigger. "It's what they do"

  13. #1078
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    Feb 2015
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    Jim how could you tell

    Honestly I have learnt that if something is really important to me the best thing I can do is involve nobody. I guarantee had I hired someone ďa riggerĒ the machine would had got at least one scratch. I got it in without a single blemish as itís that important to me. A rigger would be thinking life and limb over the about 10k I have into the machine along with at least a few hundred dollars labor with no option to re pain of it gets scratched on the way it.

    I see it this way. When someone else screws up and I hired them I get very very disappointed and always great having had anyone do anything for me. If I screw up I can accept responsibility and consequence. For instance when I screw up regarding work I own it and make it right. I never ever try to sneak it by and pass the buck. Hence I am that much more careful all the way through even if itís on my buck.

    Iíve tried hiring people sadly I have a standard that would require being able to afford the best and I just canít afford the best so I have to do it myself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I know you really prefer to be self-sufficient, but there are certainly times when using an expert resource might be worth the money to keep from killing yourself... So another option for moving in the truly heavy stuff is to hire a rigger. "It's what they do"

  14. #1079
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    Exactly!

    I responded to jim before reading your response.

    Case in point is at work. We are all getting old and are bodies damaged. We tried a few times to hire cabinet specific movers to move our work into a few project that were a bear to tend to. Each and every time something got damaged, lost and then nobody would take responsibility.

    So you know for me into never worth involving someone else unless it’s another guy that gets it like yourself, a Brian Holcombe or Mark here as you all I’m pretty sure get it.

    The toolbox is in. No pictures yet as I gotta take the dog for a walk as he hates me right now being I ignored hi all day yesterday.

    Also gotta go to harbor freight to buy a chain hoist to rig something up to lift the top box of my toolbox onto the base. I’ll also use it to get the trunion into the base.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hennebury View Post
    Hi Jim, I had to pick-up a granite surface plate from the city 50 miles away it was 48" x 96" by 14" thick on a steel base and weighs 6 or 7000 lbs I called a heavy equipment moving company, the same one that the government had hired to bring the surface plate to the warehouse a few weeks earlier. The quoted me $3500. I hired a flatbed truck and driver from the steelworks down the road from me, we went in and loaded it and brought it my place. i hired a forklift and driver from the farm supply company up the road from me to offload it. About four hours work and All in it cost me $400. I have hired many riggers over the years, some are worth their weight in gold and some of them are out for your gold. You have to be really careful explaining to riggers what you want, they may just throw a chain over you nice paintwork, or bend or crush a couple of parts. I have seen guys with forklifts lift machines up by delicate precision machined parts, that cannot be treated that way. They can do a lot of damage, and that to me is extremely stressful, far more than me doing the job, if it is "reasonable" for me to do so. Lets face it, no one is going to be more careful moving this saw than Patrick.
    But you have to weigh up the situation and make the best decision.

  15. #1080
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    I think the idea is sound, even if there are other more suitable (and affordable) resources than a "rigger". My real point was the "don't kill yourself" part. We want this thread to continue and it can't if you die under a pile of iron and steel.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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