Page 32 of 46 FirstFirst ... 2228293031323334353642 ... LastLast
Results 466 to 480 of 682

Thread: Vintage Martin T75 restoration

  1. #466
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,446
    A little more progress.

    Thes parts are very close to ready for polyester. There are a few little bondo touch ups here and there I need to do but mostly they are done. I’m counting on the polyester to take care of any imperfections left at this point.

    FCF5EDBB-56A5-4391-871D-D6A08AC74FFA.jpg

    FAE7A4BA-30CB-4C8A-AB04-B458A97F1B54.jpg

    The radiused end of these were ground with flat spots gallore. They still need a bit of work but otherwise this piece I think should look pretty good all said and done.

    5F6CE653-D7DA-4280-9B5C-F660CDB7B9E3.jpg

    Again the rounded corners of this door had flat spots gallor. All the radiused top “or rather bottom” of the door. The round part faces down, had a giant flat spot in the cast. I just could leave it that way even though you would never ever see it. They did the same at the factory with the dust collection chute, anything facing down they just left a mess.

    I can’t have that, It goes against my nature. Fine for someone else’s saw if that’s what they want.

    The bond is not nearly as thick as it looks.

    A80A3567-D692-4992-8F3E-9D7768FD529C.jpg

    Flat spot gone!

    6D953F11-E3CD-4FA4-B9DB-6B94F763AA8C.jpg
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 02-20-2019 at 10:01 PM.

  2. #467
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,446
    I got In a few more hours tonight. The plan is to take a day off tomorrow and then give this a full day of work Sunday. I think I can have all the filler ready and the parts ready for the polyester.

    I had a visitor this evening. A very nice guy I met right here on the forum a couple or few years ago now. Back when I was building my Roubo I made mention of spending hundreds of dollars on large clamps I did not have. This member chimed In and offered up and brought me a pile of clamps. He then let me use them for a couple years.

    So this Woodworking fairy has a in with Norton Sandpaper and wasgenerous enough to drop me off a box of free sandpaper. What a guy is all i can say. Well thank, I can also say thank you. This guy is so friendly, generous and genuine i can’t help but feel I’m really just a disgrace of a human.

    C6362AFA-DA5D-47B8-8339-76A494A0A6EF.jpg

    Again some of this body filler is going to look really heavy. In some cases it is in the pics. But the parts are not done and match of what you see will be sanded off.

    Pre filler

    DDDFBF0C-31D4-4EB7-81D1-7BCA4C0355CE.jpg

    Post filler but not even close to done.

    44ED9271-04D0-4CB5-A509-FAA31EC4D7B0.jpg

    Then just pictures of piles of parts mostly and or very close to really for polyester. This is not little bit of work. This is a poop ton of work but very very worth it.

    C9D5601D-B6C6-48C6-B7AC-BD6D2ED63AA5.jpg

    A94D2547-2399-418F-BB04-060214BBBDBD.jpg

    I gotta get this piece perfect like a gas tank on a motorcycle. My guess is another hour or so fine tuning body fuller and sanding.

    FE0C64ED-35FA-4C28-AA20-F87903BFE169.jpg

    F7D0CC4D-A331-4C0C-B9C1-65D87EB909B5.jpg

    61853661-1DE3-48A8-B333-95B8D67584F7.jpg

  3. #468
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    739
    Patrick,
    looking very good! Above and beyond for sure. I also noticed on my T23 they only filled where it shows. A mater of economics I am sure.

    I have not done much filling on my restorations and learning here.

    I have a question for the metal working guys. One thing that has plagued me on my restorations is fish eye when I get down to the painting. I was cleaning pre painting with paint thinner and someone mentioned that was not a good idea so I picked up some cleaner from the auto paint store. That helped a little but still seem to get more fish eye than I would like.

  4. #469
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Calhoon View Post
    I have a question for the metal working guys. One thing that has plagued me on my restorations is fish eye when I get down to the painting. I was cleaning pre painting with paint thinner and someone mentioned that was not a good idea so I picked up some cleaner from the auto paint store. That helped a little but still seem to get more fish eye than I would like.


    I'd assume it's the same as with any finish, inadequate prep and cleaning, but interested in responses.
    Shortcut for putting me on ignore:
    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/profile.php?do=ignorelist

  5. #470
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,446
    Joe,

    Don’t look to my work to guide you as I’m also learning as I go. Mostly I rely heavily on googling till my brain hurts making the best educated decision I can and using the info to knock on the appropriate doors and have the appropriate questions to ask. In this case it has been talking directly with Axalta. My fingers are still crossed.

    Case in point and with fish eye in mind. Our finisher just finished spraying a 80% high gloss conversion varnish kitchen for us. It was a freaking nightmare and in the end only turned out acceptable. Fish eye and orange peel haunted him. I have a feeling that kind of high gloss finish is not obtained on cabinetry with a conversion varnish but via other avenues and maybe we or he should have known so much.

    I can only hope that when I get to the finish paint stage I don’t have any problems. I am very very worried. Further I’m worried that years down the road all this paint stays stuck and I don’t have adhesion issues due to my prep and or using the wrong materials with each other or in the wrong order. What a bummer that will be.

    Recently I was researching the Imron paint I’m using and read in a number of places a fresh air respirator is mandatory and that essentially a charcoal filter can be used for a short time but stops working quickly and when it does you have no idea and are then breathing cyanid.

    I took particular notice to this as after both my previous spray sessions I had diarrhea and or forgive me here not so much diarrhea but was kinda pissing water out my ass. A coincidence maybe but who knows.

    So now I’m looking at spending another $2k on the appropriate reporator setup. So I’ll have $2k into a respirator. $1500 in spray guns. And another $1500 in paint materials “without abrasives”...

    So as Brian suggested don’t keep track as this saw is gonna cost me a few bucks all said and done. Still a steal imop over buying a new Italian or Austrian made machine.

    As for paint prep so far I’m using a paint prep by either Smart or Start, it comes in a one gallon can black label yellow writing. The stuff is nasty nasty nasty. I got some on me one session and it left mild burns on my wrist where it had run down my protective gloves. It really hurt like a sob almost felt like and looked like you could see layers of skin had been burnt away like a chemical skin peel. Or like if you just started sanding flesh away. No problems with fish eye so far but I am only shooting primer so far and suspect fish eye will not show up till I introduce gloss.

    . al
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Calhoon View Post
    Patrick,
    looking very good! Above and beyond for sure. I also noticed on my T23 they only filled where it shows. A mater of economics I am sure.

    I have not done much filling on my restorations and learning here.

    I have a question for the metal working guys. One thing that has plagued me on my restorations is fish eye when I get down to the painting. I was cleaning pre painting with paint thinner and someone mentioned that was not a good idea so I picked up some cleaner from the auto paint store. That helped a little but still seem to get more fish eye than I would like.
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 02-23-2019 at 9:34 AM.

  6. #471
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    5,622
    Blog Entries
    7
    Joe, Might be better to scuff it with sandpaper instead of wiping with cleaner. Oil and wax are the culprit usually.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  7. #472
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    739
    I always considered myself a fair wood finisher but metal seems like a whole different world. BTW, a fresh air mask is a good thing. I used one back when we were spraying a lot of pre cat and conversation. I try to avoid all those finishes now. Just opening a can of lacquer thinner bothers me anymore. Another thing, after spraying my machines I notice a few flecks of Martin Water blue on doors and windows going out. Even after cleaning the booth... Customers never noticed. I liked it!

    Brian, I used the cleaner after final scuffing with sandpaper. Both my restorations I left original paint where it was good just feathering it in. Maybe this is the problem. If I do another I hope to improve on the painting.

  8. #473
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Williamstown,ma
    Posts
    862
    With metalwork, my brother always wipes it down twice with prepsol I believe. Fisheyes can be water in the air, or wax on the parts.
    But silicone is far and away the worst culprit.
    It takes almost none to wreak havoc.
    I do not knowingly let anything into the shop, short of gasketing, with silicone in it.
    A full face mask with P95 or above organic and charcoal filters are what was recommended to us, and what we use.

    We have had excellent results with conversion varnishes on wood, and the 2k polyurethanes in clears.

  9. #474
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,446
    So anyone that knows anything about this stuff please chime in.

    These are the two setups I’m looking at. I’m not excited to spend nearly a couple thousand bucks on a respirator but I’m also not excited to consider I could give myself permanent asthma or worse. As it is I have spent my whole life this far c0nsuming massive amounts of toxic chemicals and dust working in various trades over the years.

    The literature and from everything I read saiz you need a fresh air resperaror to spray the Imron. At this point I have sprayed it twice and I can’t say without affect. I could also just be doing to much reading now and freaking myself out. As said I did notice uncontrollable water like stools for a full 24mhrs after the two times I sprayed the Imron product. I also noticed I was very very tired like exhausted but attributed that to working 60-70 hr weeks with my job and then this project combined with a good 8hr clip spent in a spray booth on both occasions.

    I’m leaning toward to 3m unit as I really don’t want to drag a hose around the spray booth and the fresh air unit I’d have to rig up out a window and with only 40’ of hose then plumbing myself through the wall of the booth and out a window will mean essentially hanging the unit off the side of the second story of the building the booth is in. I don’t think just leaving it outside the booth is good enough as although the booth exhausts out the fourth floor roof of the building when you walk into the second floor and in many case enter the building and cv is being sprayed you can smell it right away. Point is if the fresh air unit is just sitting outside the booth it’s not doing me much good. Better yes but fresh air I don’t think so.

    So does anyone know about this stuff indetail and or the 600 series 3m unit.

    If I go the 3m route it’s gonna mean I have to slow down a week or two on my progress as it’s a big expenditure and I have some rather large bills approaching with spring.

    Crap links..

    https://www.envirosafetyproducts.com...-papr-kit.html

    http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/m...tegory_Code=HP
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 02-23-2019 at 12:18 PM.

  10. #475
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    3,345
    I have been enjoying your thread.

    I use a low-buck supplied air system. It starts with a "disposable" hood, which comes either with an attached hose, or without the attached hose. You can find the ones with the attached hose, which you need on the first one, off ebay for 30 buck range. It's a Tyvek hood, with plexi face shield, and several rip off face covers. can't post a link here, but I'll look, and come back to edit with the item number.

    For a hose, I bought a couple of long Shop Vac hoses from Lowes, and of course, these can't be used for anything else.

    I've used several things for the air pump. The first thing I tried was an HVLP turbine, but one thing they don't tell you about these is that they heat the air. That doesn't work too good in hot weather. With that in mind, it gave me the idea to try a little 120v window air conditioner. This works, and can be rigged to only bring in outside air if you have a window to stick it in. It also is a big benefit in hot weather, but you don't have to have the cooling on. Almost any rigged up air supply requires some amount of duct tape to get it to work. The little AC requires some playing with it to figure out how much air you have to dump before you get what you want through the hose.

    The other thing I tried to start with, for an air supply, was a new little Shop Vac, but I was never convinced that the air wouldn't have some oil in it, so I wore a respirator under it.

    You do have to get used to dragging a tail, but when spraying, the hose, and air tube can be tied together, so you only have one thing to flip around.

    One thing I forgot is the hood comes with a little belt that you have to get adjusted right, and use, or the hood will simply blow off your head. In cold weather might find yourself needing a hat that also covers your ears, or they will get cold. The amount of air coming in right behind your head is way more than you can breathe, and exits out the bottom of the hood.

    I have use this for spraying some toxic stuff, including Moisture Cure Urethane on a small airplane hanger floor. MCU is probably even more toxic than Imron, which I painted a boat with back in the '70's.

    Fresh air is very important, as you found out. I have spent many hours under these hoods. They say they're disposable, but they last through many uses. I do keep a couple of spares without the attached hose.

    edited to add: I looked for the long Shop Vac hoses I use, that I said came from Lowes. Looks like they're not available any more, but are about the same thing as these: https://www.acehardware.com/departme...YaAucwEALw_wcB I think it's important to stick with the large diameter, since you want to use a long hose.

    Last edited by Tom M King; 02-23-2019 at 1:51 PM.

  11. #476
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    3,345
    I didn't get the item number, but do a search for: Allegro Industries 9910-10 Replacement Tyvek Supplied Air Respirator Hood

    on ebay. Make sure you get the one with the attached hose, and belt to start with. I'm not sure if this one has that or not, but the price seems right that it would.

  12. #477
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,099
    Patrick, I applaud your level of detail and desire for a Concours type restoration. Having said that, I've got machines with $400/gal paint and machines with $50/gal paint and after a few years I can't tell the difference in looks or performance. if the spray equipment will see lots of use, the $1000 is well spent, but that money spent today to improve and prolong your life assumes you have enough money saved to enjoy that life. Don't lose sight that money spent on old machines should not impact the money saved to support your future needs because selling the old machines will not fund your retirement. Dave

  13. #478
    in the past there were two prep cleaners. One wiped the car down before any sanding or stripping to remove wax on the car and the out of the equation instead of possibly grinding it in or dragging it around. The other prep stuff was a final wipe before top coat spraying it on the car from a hand bottle and wiping off using several wipes or fresh ones as you wipe it just to be as clean as possible. I think sometimes solvent pop gets blamed as fish eye. Figure on machines there is grease and oil through its life and some of you have machines with automatic oilers. On some finishes you can get fish eyes if you lay them on too thick and heavy. I had that first time using an automotive base coat, fine once it was explained how that finish worked. Not up on the new ambient air blowers but the 3M ambient blower of the old days was very well made. Hood not comfortable but improved, hose very strong but a pain in a small booth on car stuff where you are walking around alot.

  14. #479
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,045
    Yea, don't kill yourself with the fumes...do what you need to do to get proper respiration for that stuff! Clearly, you've already experienced the "mild" effects and it could be a lot worse with serious spraying going on. We don't want to have to print your obituary here, my friend...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #480
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    3,345
    My supplied air system is, of course, only good if it's bringing in air from the outside that's not mixed with any of the toxic fumes. If you normally breathe unfiltered air when outside, it's not much different. If you you need to breathe air from inside, that has the fumes in it, you will obviously need some really fancy filters.

    I always even consider the wind direction when deciding on placement for the "pump", and make sure it's upwind .

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •