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Thread: Vintage Martin T75 restoration

  1. #226
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    On things like pins, if they're not scored and are without burrs then you can very lightly touch them up with scotchbright, remove the grease that is existing and regrease. They'll be completely like new.

    If there are burrs then remove them. Don't hone or buff anything, it'll open the clearances too far.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  2. #227
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    Good points and Brian, and thank you for taking the time to point such out.

    When I say I’m gonna buff every turd “sorry couldn’t help it” I am speaking of mostly cosmetic non functioning pieces such as the knob on the rip fence or little knurled knobs that tighten the fence or the heads of nuts and bolts.

    For instance in the case of what I have apart right now I’ll just clean up the inside with some compressed air taking care not to blow crap into the bearings. I’ll then take everything all the way apart, remove all paint, replace the bearings and the plastic gib screws then put it back together and see how it functions. In the case of this piece I’ll largely leave the inside of the female part alone. One plate has indexing pins and yes those along with the inside of the female pice will just see some degreaser and a maroon scotch brite pad.

    Sadly I have to work again today. I have a three week vacation coming up starting next Monday. I should be able to make some headway on the project in that time. Should is the operative word as I have so many other projects going on.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    On things like pins, if they're not scored and are without burrs then you can very lightly touch them up with scotchbright, remove the grease that is existing and regrease. They'll be completely like new.

    If there are burrs then remove them. Don't hone or buff anything, it'll open the clearances too far.

  3. #228
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    I have a three week vacation coming up starting next Monday. I should be able to make some headway on the project in that time. Should is the operative word as I have so many other projects going on.
    Should is an easy word to defeat in this scenario. If you want it, make it happen.

    If you plug away on that thing for 60 hours a week for the next three weeks you should be damn near back to assembled in 180 hours assuming you aren't waiting for parts. Even then, three weeks is an eternity.
    Shortcut for putting me on ignore:
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  4. #229
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Wasner View Post
    Should is an easy word to defeat in this scenario. If you want it, make it happen.

    If you plug away on that thing for 60 hours a week for the next three weeks you should be damn near back to assembled in 180 hours assuming you aren't waiting for parts. Even then, three weeks is an eternity.
    About right. I would say a month or more, especially trying to source parts.

  5. #230
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    I would agree, I had a month plus on the T23 and then quit tracking my time... my mechanic skills are not the greatest so a good wrench hand would be quicker.
    the painting and reassembly took a lot of the time.

    I had a week into just redoing the Festo feeder recently. All the time I keep thinking about Engelfried’s comment about repainting not being a economic possibility..

    Darcy’s comment about spot touch up of the original paint is very common sense and is the route I plan for a couple of my machines. All depends on how you want to spend your time.

  6. #231
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    I'll get back to the t-75 conversation later.

    While I have some Sunday morning attention I'm wondering if I might get some help from other Martin slider users regarding the t -73 I just setup at work.

    The electronic blade bevel just stopped working late yesterday.

    Rise and fall works fine. Tilt or bevel though is completely dead.

    It did not go all st once, well pretty much but it didn't work suddenly and I was able to get it back to 0% so tried to bevel it again snd it got stuck at like 21.7% I was then able to bring it from 0% to 21.7% a couple times before it just quite at a convirnent 21.7%

    Totally sucks as I'm fitting doirs and cutting back panels fir a unit that has to be in the first booth tomorrow.

    No big deal ts sled and track Saw but I need to fix this asap!

    It makes a clicking noise when I press either button but does zero.

    Help!

  7. #232
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    Help!
    Inadequate lubrication causing friction and tripping an overload?

    My planer does that once in a while. Grease it up, and it's back in action.

  8. #233
    I would say just crank the handle, but Martin can't be bothered to put both on a machine anymore.

    Check overloads.

    I hate all electronic controlled saws and such. Not much to go wrong cranking a handwheel.

  9. #234
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    Well I did as you suggested. The saw “was stuck”at 21.7% now I can get it to go back and forth between 0 and 221.84 or something like that.

    So who knows I supspect something has got to be hanging up the worm gear that’s driven by a small motor. I have been to busy working and not absolutely in need of the saw to get under it with a good light and just figure it out. I suspect something needs more lube or something fell in the way of something like a strut or the trunion or a limit screw or something like that is going on?

    More tomorrow as this last project is offf to the spray booth and the next project is a couple days out while we get RO’s.

    Thanks for the help though as getting the saw back to zero was a huge help today.

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Wasner View Post
    Inadequate lubrication causing friction and tripping an overload?

    My planer does that once in a while. Grease it up, and it's back in action.

  10. #235
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    I couldn’t Help but think Darcy man I love this saw but man if my T-75 turns out being anywhere as nice I’m gonna be soooooo freaking happy it’s all manual. Well I’m gonna put Brian lambs digital crosscut stops on it and maybe something on the rip fence if I can figure it out but nothing that world compromise the ability to yuse the saw manually


    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    I would say just crank the handle, but Martin can't be bothered to put both on a machine anymore.
    .


    Check overloads.

    I hate all electronic controlled saws and such. Not much to go wrong cranking a handwheel.

  11. #236
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    So I finished up my work day a bit more early than I thought I would today. Well I started stupid early so maybe not. Point is I found some time to get started on the t-75.

    I decided to tackle the arm the cross cut table is supported by. As stated above and yesterday it had tons of slop in it. I had noticed a couple of plastic gib screws that index the male portion from either side and figured they should just be able to be tightened a bit to get rid of the left to right slop. I t to take th whole thing apart and make sure it was not something else coursing the problem.

    Iím glad I did as I found minor metal to metal contact within the arm.

    The first thing I found when taking the arm part was the bolt used to adjust the height of the table off the arm and I relationship to the sliding table was bent.

    3D9FFC5E-5B1A-487E-8BAC-4A524FAB841C.jpg

    Sadly to fix this I suspect Iím gonna have to ruin the threads to get the bolt out then re tap with a larger thread. Iím kinda bummed and if someone sees another solution please chime in. I could upset he bolt as is but it does not offer the full range of adjustability. For all I know itís fine right where it is. On the other hand I want to address all isssue when doing this work as I donít what a machine after all my efforts that requires the workarounds so often associated with old machinery that has been abused.

  12. #237
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    Upon taking the the plate or sheet steel plate off one side I was able to see how this thing functioned inside. I’m not sure what I expected. I suppose I expected bearings form all four sides in true Martin fashion. I was a bit disappointed to find these plastic Delrin type washers on screws. I was more disappointed to see that at some point someone threaded a NU,net of these screws into their holes at a angle. This created a isssue as the head of the screw in some instanced was projecting beyond the delrin washers. I suppose I can retap these holes also if need be. The solution today was a good soak in kerosene a wire brush and then I sanded the heads of the screw with a piece of sticky back sand paper stuck to my mdf bench till the heads dropped bellow the delrin washer. As I type this I’m already thinking I’m gonna have to re tap these holes and replace the screws as I can see this becoming a problem again as the delrin washers wear.

    55E3C605-21C1-4DD9-B808-559A701E8366.jpg

    Here’s all the parts roughly cleaned. This is not my finished product but rather just getting the drift and grime off. Screws and nuts and the suck will all be cleaned Ona buffing and or polishing machine before final assembly and or just replaced and new.

    EADA296A-D24D-48C5-9C41-FAB5CF001DF1.jpg

  13. #238
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    The arm has a rubber roller wheel on one end and on one side of the interior extrusion with a small bearing on the opposing side. Thatís one side of the extrusion like like left to right top and bottom.

    The other side has a small bearing on the top and two large bearings it rolls on that are attached to the exterior or female extrusion. The good news was all bearings seemed in great condition. Iíll price them and decide then if Iím going to replace them.

    The other good news is that even though I wa gettting metal to metal contact on the sides where the delrin washers should be riding smoothly against the two sides of the female or exterior extrusion the wear means minimal to nothing. I cleaned the interior cavity up with kerosene and left it at that.

    5A800DD2-7208-48B6-945E-2EA98EAF2F58.jpg

    FE9E8191-FCE5-46B5-9417-B52BA3B45AFA.jpg

  14. #239
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    Here’s all the parts cleaned up, remeber just cleaned not restored.

    Maybe good enough for some but not me.


    D709AEB2-620F-4F7E-94F8-3E7D54869FAE.jpg

  15. #240
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    Those bearings are probably only gonna run $10-15.00 a piece. They are low speed average tolerance units. My T17 needed new bearings for the slider, and I think it was less than $50.00 for all of them.

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