Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: X-Carve - How difficult is this project?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    46

    X-Carve - How difficult is this project?

    Hi all...I have what I assume is an easy solution to my problem if I buy an X-Carve. Just trying to see what sort of learning curve and difficulty I should expect.


    I'm installing hardwood floors in my upstairs hallway. there is a curve where the staircase hits the second level. I've been trying to figure out a good way to cut the ends of the flooring to meet the curve and the best way I thought of was to somehow measure the curve (either template, or radius it, something), and use the X-Carve to create a template in MDF. Then I will clamp up the boards and use a router with a pattern bit to copy the shape from the template onto the flooring. I just think cutting the ends and using the spindle sander or whatever just won't be tight enough.


    How difficult is what I'm proposing? Am I making this way too complicated?

  2. #2
    It is not worth buying the xcarve just for scribing and fitting flooring, probably less accurate than trimming your mdf template with the spindle sander and/or a rasp.

    That said, a CNC can be used for many other things. An xcarve would not be my first choice as a CNC.
    Colorado Woodworkers Guild
    Colorado CNC User Group

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    46
    Yeah, this wasn't just for that, I think I've got a lot of potential uses for a CNC in my shop so I was thinking this could be a first project for it.

    What would be your first choice?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    46,586
    While I believe you "could" so what you propose with a small CNC, I'm not sure it's a practical reason to buy one in both financial and learning curve terms specifically for that one project. I think that Richard is also correct that you may get a better result for your template if you "sneak up on it" manually, just because of how "consistent" homes are around how things fit together. If you are interested in adding CNC to your woodworking activities and are not in a hurry to get this specific job done, however, it's worthy of your consideration, however. I'm sad I waited so long!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by James Jayko View Post
    I think I've got a lot of potential uses for a CNC in my shop so I was thinking this could be a first project for it.

    What would be your first choice?
    My first choice, for me, was to design and build my own. What I recommend for most people is to figure out what they want to make, how large, in what materials, and then find a machine capable of doing what they need it to do. I do not recommend buying based on price.

    If it is for general woodworking, do you need a machine that can work on edges and ends of boards as well as faces? Few machines out there can, which is why I designed my own. For many, the need to work on sheet stock is paramount, so think about a machine with vacuum hold down. There are a myriad of other uses (luthiery, sign making, 3D carving, rotary work, etc.) that might tilt your decision to one machine or another. It is worth really thinking about your needs, both short and long term including things like whether this is strictly hobby, or potentially commercial, before making a buying decision.

    The best advice, is to start with one or more of the software packages for designing, and start learning it. Fusion 360 can be had for free for hobby or commercial use up to $100k per year. Vectric makes a full line of products pretty much dedicated to CNC routers, all have free trials. If your main need is cabinetry, there are products dedicated to that. This can and should be done prior to choosing a machine.
    Colorado Woodworkers Guild
    Colorado CNC User Group

  6. #6
    I have access to an X-carve and have used it for many may many interesting projects.
    I must admit that when it comes to any kind of computer coding or other complicated CNC stuff, I am completely lost.
    X-carve comes with software that is incredibly easy to use. I had a 15 minute introduction to the machine and the software before designing up my first project and it came out perfect.
    My guess is, the time many people spend designing on software is time I spend actually making stuff on the X-Carve. A light-weight machine but works really well for home use. There are people out there making a living on this machine.
    Yes, X-carve is a beginners machine and certainly not up to 24 hour a day professional use. On the other hand, it is easy to use, fun to use and did I mention easy? And fun? And more fun?

    In regards to your flooring project, I would simply make up the part you need and adjust and readjust until it fits properly and then copy and make your final assembly part.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Iowa USA
    Posts
    3,106
    Quote Originally Posted by kreig mcbride View Post
    I have access to an X-carve and have used it for many may many interesting projects.
    I must admit that when it comes to any kind of computer coding or other complicated CNC stuff, I am completely lost.
    X-carve comes with software that is incredibly easy to use. I had a 15 minute introduction to the machine and the software before designing up my first project and it came out perfect.
    My guess is, the time many people spend designing on software is time I spend actually making stuff on the X-Carve. A light-weight machine but works really well for home use. There are people out there making a living on this machine.
    Yes, X-carve is a beginners machine and certainly not up to 24 hour a day professional use. On the other hand, it is easy to use, fun to use and did I mention easy? And fun? And more fun?

    In regards to your flooring project, I would simply make up the part you need and adjust and readjust until it fits properly and then copy and make your final assembly part.
    That would work. Even if you measured and took in some points entered by hand in your CAD program and drew the curve or shape to fit those points, trial and error will get you closer each time. Make the template of your design out of something cheap and try.
    Some people love to design and built CNC like Richard. I could but don't, I would rather design and build something on my machine. (I am nearing 76) I have enough fun just improving what I have now. Go for it.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa. , Ray Fine 20w Galvo Fiber laser (SOLD) , LightObject 40w CO2 Laser and Chiller, MakerGear M2 3D Printer. Qe60+ Vinyl cutter. Fine Line Automation 4x4 CNC Router

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •