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Thread: How long should diamond hone last?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    61

    How long should diamond hone last?

    I started using skews in January and have been honing with a fine diamond hone between sharpening. I have not used the hone too much (Iíve made maybe 2 dozen wands for my kids and neighbors), but it feels like it is worn out and doesnít really give me a new edge anymore like it used to. I was wondering how often you typically have to replace your honing tool, for those that use them.

    I have been using dry, should I have used lapping fluid or water? Maybe Iím pressing too hard?

    Here is the tool Iíve been using, though I think Iíll try the blue Eze-Lap tool that some have mentioned.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    San Diego, Ca
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    1,036
    I think that some places offer a "special" fluid to help keep them clean. I have also heard that mineral oil (which is a lot less expensive) works just as well as the "special" fluid. I've also been told that baby oil (from the dollar store) is just mineral oil with perfume. So that is another option.

    I usually dip the tip of my diamond files in mineral oil and then wipe it (and some black stuff) off.

    I think that the matrix holding the diamond particles is what will eventually fail. But I find that the mineral oil treatment will clean up some of the fine plugging metal particles. Give it a try - - not much to lose. It seems to work for me.

  3. #3
    Thomas

    Use water or windex diluted with water to lubricate (and flush) diamond hones. Diamond hones are sometimes more aggressive when new, until some of the larger particles have fractured. I would guess that's what you have experienced. I honestly doubt that the use you describe would have worn it out.

    Doug

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    6,594
    Thomas,

    I hate to say it, but I had the same experience with the same DMT hones. I started buying the EZE-LAP which last and last. They are made with a thicker plate for the base that is perfectly flat all the way to the edges, good for getting in tight places such as when touching up pen mills, drillbits, and such. I've been using the same extra fine (blue) hone on my skews and other tools (scrapers, gouges, etc) for years now, and I use it a lot. I threw the DMT hones away!

    I do use a light touch, no fluid.

    One thing I did discover - most of the various diamond hones I have do cut better when new. I suspect this is due to the way the particles are electroplated on the metal - like CBN wheels some particles stick up higher and make the hone more aggressive until these are fractured or knocked out. At first I thought the EZE-LAPs were wearing out too quickly. But unlike the DMT which simply quit cutting, the EZE-LAPs I use settled down but still continued to work.

    They aren't cheap though. But I like them so much at the lathe, my sharpening station, and my metalworking area that I contacted the company years ago - they sold me a "lifetime" supply at a huge discount, less than 1/2 the retail price. I don't know if they will still do this but if so it might be good for a club. I've got some of all the grits they make, handy on occasion!

    However, that said, I started using another method recently to touch up skews to shaving sharp between the diamond honings. I resawed some MDF to make thinner pieces about 4x6" or so with one side rougher than the usual MDF surface. (Probably could have sanded one side with coarse paper.) I rub some type of polishing compound into the rougher side. Doesn't seem to matter what kind - the green stick, white stick, Tormek honing compound, etc. I strop the skew on this surface, being careful to hold the bevel almost flat against the MDF or angled up no more than a fraction of a degree. I like the result better than stropping on something flexible such as the leather I used to use. So far I think the skews work better and with a little less honing.

    BTW, I sharpen the skews on a 600 grit CBN wheel and immediately strop on the MDF to knock off the tiny burr. The very edge looks polished. I don't use the diamond hone until I strop it several times like this.

    JKJ




    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson80 View Post
    I started using skews in January and have been honing with a fine diamond hone between sharpening. I have not used the hone too much (Iíve made maybe 2 dozen wands for my kids and neighbors), but it feels like it is worn out and doesnít really give me a new edge anymore like it used to. I was wondering how often you typically have to replace your honing tool, for those that use them.

    I have been using dry, should I have used lapping fluid or water? Maybe Iím pressing too hard?

    Here is the tool Iíve been using, though I think Iíll try the blue Eze-Lap tool that some have mentioned.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    61
    Thanks for the replies everyone.

  6. #6
    I have a set of DMT stones that are 25 years old. I had stopped using them because they didn't cut. I applied some of the Trend lapping fluid and that made a huge difference. The top surfaces were black, which I would suppose was just accumulated metal. I would suggest regular washing of your stone. Many different methods. I always use some fluid as a lubricant when I use them now. WD 40, 3 in 1, spit, water, what ever is handy. It doesn't seem to make much difference, at least not that I can tell. Dave Schweitzer of D Way told me to take my old CBN wheels and soak them in soapy water for an hour or three, then hit with a brush. That helped as does the lapping fluid applied to the bevels of my tools before I sharpen. Both CBN and Diamond will break in and cut faster when new. Carbide on a CBN wheel will really grind them down, so don't do that one....

    robo hippy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    135
    I use Alan Lacer's slip stone. It has resided in the back pocket of my turning smock for at least 6 years and still is going strong. It is a bit pricey, but I really like it and would highly recommend it to anyone.

    http://stores.alanswoodturningstore....lipstone-hone/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Sparta Tn
    Posts
    270
    the Trend diamond hones outlast the EZ lap many time over. I used to go through a set of the EZ lap in about a year. I have had the Trend 2 sided hone now for about 5 years and it's still cutting good. I do use a drop of their fluid fairly often but not every time I pick it up.

  9. #9
    i agree with paul. I have the lacer one and it is going strong after several years, i use it for most of the tools except scrapers. I really like it because it has two rounded edges, two different radius's that i use in the groove of gouges mostly on final passes
    Dean

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
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    6,594
    Quote Originally Posted by Dean S Walker View Post
    ...it has two rounded edges, two different radius's that i use in the groove of gouges mostly on final passes
    A less expensive option for inside curves is the DMT diamond cone. The taper gives a different radius at at different points so it is good for honing the inside of my smallest and larger gouges.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00004WFT1..._t2_B00004WFT4

    conical-diamond-hone-DMT.jpg

    JKJ

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,909
    Like all grinding stones diamond tends to have the pores clog up with waste. the work glides on top of the waste and does not even touch the grit. The waste has to be cleaned off by washing.
    On some diamond and I suppose CBN the matrix has to be cleared out as the working particles erode. Similar to washing out the waste. Check out "sticking" a diamond wheel and then stoning it with a old broken grinding wheel.
    Bill D

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