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Thread: The complete opposite of a Neaderthal.

  1. #1

    The complete opposite of a Neaderthal.

    Nice to see what this guy does with his self made machine.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zt1ES1WP454

  2. #2
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    Shouldn't the tails be on the sides and not the faces of the drawers?

    Otherwise an interesting machine.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
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    Fashion Jim, fashion. Pushing the boat out, making the new vogue. In all seriousness thats a pretty cool machine and setup. I have to admit my fingers started twitching and reaching for a hand plane when I saw waste that could be zipped off 10 time faster with a No 4. Interesting how much attention and manual guide seems to be needed. I have to admit I looked over at a bunch of stock I need to break down into plane billets by hand then mortise out by hand and thought "hmm, might be a bit faster with this bad boy eh."

  4. #4
    His wristwatch appears to be made of wood.

  5. #5
    I'm all for technology...heck, I'm the first guy in my city to buy a 3d printer for my dental office.

    However, I thought his machine and design was pretty pointless.
    At that level, he should just check the wood in a full on CNC.
    Also, the joinery is pointless bragging...I could break the thing by leaning on it.

    Aaargh!

  6. #6
    Actually, you could almost call it a manual CNC machine, almost like a Neanderthal CNC. It looks like the coordinates are output on the display, but the human does all the power feeding and directional control. Kind of like using a Bridgeport manually, but still having DROs.

    I must say though, the power tool side of me likes the router in an overhead carriage set up with easy stops and nice work holding. It could make some processes easier.

  7. #7
    I watched a few seconds of this video from another forum. Interestingly, Sellers has had a "spirited" (or "stubborn" to some) discussion on his blog about woodworking with machines and he definitely would call this Korean woodworker not woodworking, but machining with wood only.

    To me, his is much worse than the CNC stuff (and that is why I found it so brutal that I could only stand a few seconds of his "woodworking."). It could be an insult to the CNC people if one compared his stuff to CNC.

    Of course, some woodworkers would love his type of woodworking, or his video(s?). I have other better ways to waste my time.

    Simon

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Shouldn't the tails be on the sides and not the faces of the drawers?

    Otherwise an interesting machine.

    jtk

    Wait a minute, Jim. Are you in essence also suggesting that this set of instructions on marking and sawing the tails (step 3) is wrong?!

    https://www.instructables.com/id/Han...s-for-Dummies/

    By the way, anyone who wonders the meaning of "the blind leading the blind" will understand it by reading some of the years-old comments there.

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 10-09-2018 at 8:53 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vincent Tai View Post
    Fashion Jim, fashion. Pushing the boat out, making the new vogue. In all seriousness thats a pretty cool machine and setup. I have to admit my fingers started twitching and reaching for a hand plane when I saw waste that could be zipped off 10 time faster with a No 4. Interesting how much attention and manual guide seems to be needed. I have to admit I looked over at a bunch of stock I need to break down into plane billets by hand then mortise out by hand and thought "hmm, might be a bit faster with this bad boy eh."
    It’s the theory of the hammer. Give a two-year-old a hammer and he/she will find something in desperate need of pounding. He has a manually controlled CNC machines, so he needs to demonstrate its utility.

  10. #10
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    I skipped through the video, my biggest gripe is the machine seems to dictate the design not the designer!
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  11. #11
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    A friend of mine sent me this video to check out the clamping device. There is a bit of genius in how he uses a clamping work table, I've not seen this on a CNC machine for woodworking. Most either use a vacuum table or t-slots.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  12. #12
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    LOL! This is how future Incra CNC Positioner will look like (as some next model after Incra LS Positioner). Or a table saw with CNC sliding table, sliding in 3 axis. Or a router table with CNC fence. Anybody dares to combine them all in LEGO-like product?

    If router would be inside a table, like in a router table, then it could be also less dust and noise, than this one.

    Meanwhile, I'm designing in my head CNC version of Neanderthal Jointmaker (the one made by Bridge City Tools), which is Neanderthal version of table saw, kind of. Two step motors for raising blade, one or two for tilting. And some controller (or Arduino) and a touch screen to control it. It might then work similar to what is in this video - digital adjustments for desired depth of cut or tilt angle but manual sliding of wood piece for cutting. Heck, one can even embed weight sensor to automatically control blade raise angle and advance it after each hand stroke... Can be cheaper than 3D printer. Thanks for this video and for spinning my ideas again!

    Those who do not know what Jointmaker is - search for "JMPv2 Jointmaker Pro". In essence, this is Japanese saw, like Dozuki or Kataba, held between to wooden blocks (like for sharpening) and the wood peace is sliding on top to be cut.

    Of course, all this is needed up to the point when we can just print wood - that is the future of that future, I guess!

  13. #13
    Not patient enough to watch the video, but there are some folks who will use CNC machines in manual mode for toolpaths which are not easily set up and verified in typical hobbyist CAD/CAM tools such as keyhole slots. There was also the LoboCNC which used positional encoders to allow one to run it in manual mode as if it were a "real" mill. The problem is of course maintaining chipload, avoiding rubbing, and not work-hardening the material.

    A PortaShop setup using modern technology would be interesting, but we do already have the Handibot and Shaper Origin, and the Maslow isn't that far removed from it (I think there's one other, something about little posts and wires for measuring distance?).

    There are 3D printing filaments which contain wood fibers, and I've been expecting the Markforged folks or someone else to work up a technique which results in faux woodgrain.

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