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Thread: Favorite hinge mortising jig?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    6,089
    Whatever jig you end up with, the longest part of the process is waiting for the router to wind down, before lifting it out. If you don't do that, odds are high that the jig will end up with a bite out of it.

    My lock and strike jigs look very similar to this one. The one for the door needs to be long enough that quick clamps, that hold it to the door, are out of the way of the router. The one for the jamb has screw holes for behind where the stop goes.

    https://www.templaco.com/html/produc...al+Application
    Last edited by Tom M King; 09-29-2018 at 12:09 PM.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
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    7,765
    I make my own as well using 1/4" Masonite and a hardwood fence to clamp it to the door. I use the same jig for the frame mortises by taking off the fence and screwing it to the frame where the door stops will be, as someone else mentioned. I used to use a collet on my router, which meant the jig had to be sized larger than the hinge, but then I discovered shallow template router bits that have a top bearing. In a palm router these bits the perfect solution for cutting hinge mortises. Best of all, using these bits you make the template the same size as the hinge so there's no guesswork or adjustment required for a perfect fit.

    JOhn

    https://www.amazon.com/Whiteside-Rou...A1WO0LWTFI0BL8

  3. #18
    Chisel and butt mortise plane. Or a dedicated shop jig and laminate trimmer, moments to make.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
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    1,097
    For the majority of our door prehanging we use the hinge master from Norfield.
    https://norfield.com/store/index.php...aster-kit.html

    It works well and the door and jamb are routed at the same time but is a little pricy for home or small shop use. Iíve also had a Porter cable jig for years and that one is a bear to use. Bosch is similar design but a little better. I think for low volume work the Templaco jigs are good.

    Its easy to make a jig also. The pictures show a shop made template we used to route hinges for interior shutters that used a hinge size smaller than the hinge master could do. This one routs the jamb and door at the same time. I think similar to what Larry does.
    A3A3DEF3-765B-41AD-9B42-4B0839852A83.jpg
    CAD95DD1-064F-4421-B2A1-40614D577A2E.jpg

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
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    4,982
    Curious why some use a router jig, and then square the corners with a chisel. Why not just use rounded hinges made for this application?
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    fayetteville Arkansas
    Posts
    597
    Quote Originally Posted by Wojciech Tryc View Post
    i have used the Porter Cable on several doors, but i replaced the router bid with Freud.
    The one supplied with the kit, burnt out quicky.
    Same experience, jig works fine, inexpensive, just throw the bit away and use a Freud.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Northern Michigan
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    4,822
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    Curious why some use a router jig, and then square the corners with a chisel. Why not just use rounded hinges made for this application?
    The kind of hinges that you would use on a $7,000 door do not come with round corners. Most of my exterior doors use roller bearing hinges. Interior doors are often cast iron. neither is available with round corners. Plus I believe square corners are less likely to move.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    4,822
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Calhoon View Post

    Its easy to make a jig also. The pictures show a shop made template we used to route hinges for interior shutters that used a hinge size smaller than the hinge master could do. This one routs the jamb and door at the same time. I think similar to what Larry does.


    A3A3DEF3-765B-41AD-9B42-4B0839852A83.jpg
    CAD95DD1-064F-4421-B2A1-40614D577A2E.jpg
    That is how I make mine Joe, except I most often use a short top bearing pattern bit so I can just use the actual hinge as a spacer when I glue up. Always had intention of building an adjustable one, but I can make a new one in a half hour so never do. Have a wall full in the barn.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
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    1,097
    Great idea about the top bearing bit Larry! Would save some calculation.
    I like routing the jamb and door at the same time. Makes getting the top gap accurate and consistent easy. That was my biggest gripe with the PC jig. And the nail holes, inaccuracy etc. My jigs don’t work for hanging doors in place though.

    I started building doors in the late 70s and never pre-hung a door till the late 80s. Something changed in the industry about that time and from that point on all the builders demanded prehung. I still think hanging in place is the best but that is a rarity now. It does take a skilled carpenter to install a heavy or large prehung custom door correctly though.

  10. #25
    I have like 6 of the old PC and B&D ones.

    It might take me 10 minutes to set one up. I cant find plywood, and tools to make a jig in less time than that.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    Whatever jig you end up with, the longest part of the process is waiting for the router to wind down, before lifting it out. If you don't do that, odds are high that the jig will end up with a bite out of it.

    My lock and strike jigs look very similar to this one. The one for the door needs to be long enough that quick clamps, that hold it to the door, are out of the way of the router. The one for the jamb has screw holes for behind where the stop goes.

    https://www.templaco.com/html/produc...al+Application
    I have the full length templaco templates in multiple heights, and really like them, heights over 6/8 they break down into 2 parts.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Cedar Park, TX (NW Austin)
    Posts
    487
    I have a Milescraft jig and used it on about ten interior doors without issue. These are so simple and the depth of cut so shallow that there is no need spending an excessive amount of money. I think the biggest chance of screw up would be human error. . . like putting the top hinge on the bottom. If you want to borrow mine I would be happy to send it to you but I think you can buy one for the cost of round trip shipping.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Whidbey Island , Wa.
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    914
    The Bosch jig is the way to go, IMO. Setting up a wood jig for different height doors , for different hinge sizes that I run into would not be viable.




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    Then if you need a much smaller door and hinge , use a chisel. Like I said , itís good practice.


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  14. #29
    I would agree it's good practice to use a chisel. Although if you are using cheap contractor slabs I would use a router. Also keep in mind the jamb mortise may not be the same on every jamb. I would make a simple jig from plywood. Install the new hinges on the existing jambs and measure them. Transfer the locations to the new slab and use the jig. I like to mount the jig fence on the barrel side, this way if you need to change the inset on the slab you could shim it away from the door face. Hope this helps.
    Stan

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Edmonton, Canada
    Posts
    2,366
    When I made 32 doors for our house I made a jig and routered all the doors and jambs with it. Quick to make one.

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