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Thread: Maka SM6-Pii

  1. #1
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    Aug 2013
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    Maka SM6-Pii

    After a long but mainly passive search, one of these machines came up for sale near me. I plan to restore it. It runs well and the pneumatics function but it has a few points i need to address.







    If nothing else I can greatly admire whomever designed this machine, it leaves me in awe a bit.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  2. #2
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    Watched a video of this animal in action. Jeez - a hungry buzzsaw for sure. Sounds like a chain gun on a Warthog. Questions - Is the garage starting to get full? Do you tend to dim the lights in the neighborhood from time to time? How does one collect dust for this new addition?
    David

  3. #3
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    I'm very jealous Brian. Occasionally I see knives come on the market, will be sure to give you a heads up when do.
    "the mechanic that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools. Confucius

  4. #4
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    Mark Hennebury is the man for these machines, so he’s probably made the video that you saw.

    To say the garage is getting full is to put it modestly, I think my wife is going to drop a cast iron table on my foot if she sees another one show up here.

    im looking forward to using it, I put some rubber feet in the hopes it will quiet it down slightly.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  5. #5
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    Yea, not only is "that garage" getting full...it's a tight single version to-boot! What a nice find, however...I enjoyed our conversation about it this afternoon. I didn't know such things existed!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
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    Thanks Jim! The pleasure is mine!

    Hah, yes this is small even by one-car standards.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  7. #7
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    Like Jim, I had no idea what it was, had to look it up. Cool machine, although I'm guessing it'll rattle your teeth.

  8. #8
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    Nice get. Mark is the man and likely has some chisels if you need them and lots of advice. His resto work is second to none. I have a Maka in storage but no experience with it. When something like that comes up, need is secondary. Dave

  9. #9
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    Jul 2007
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    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
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    woodmortise3[1].jpg




    Thanks Brian and David.

  10. #10
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    Jul 2007
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    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
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  11. #11
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    Dang....that thang cuts fast! Brian described it to be yesterday when he was visiting, but it's hard to visualize until you "see the buzz". Thanks for sharing that video, Mark!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    I've been getting a chance to dig in a bit in my late evening hours, mainly to fix aesthetic problems, but also to check the more important functional aspects of the machine.

    This looks like it could be just a worn area on the table, but I will check the ways for parallelism next.



    This is quite curious and explains why the machine had an auxiliary table bolted on with a huge shim. I do believe, however that it is just the cutter seat that is out and not the shaft.



    If that is the case it will be an 'easy' fix to mill the surface and bring it back into parallel with the table, which I assume it needs to be in order to cut cleanly.

    The post connections to the body are in good shape.

    Started cleaning up these things, filling holes and reshaping the one corner with a bit of epoxy. If it holds, great, if it does not I will weld a new corner on, but I always hesitate to weld a machined casting.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  13. #13
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    How do you sharpen the cutters?
    David

  14. #14
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    That is an interesting machine Brian. Wil enjoy seeing you use it in the future.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Eisenhauer View Post
    How do you sharpen the cutters?
    Not sure, but I know this to be the most important aspect of running the machines on a continuous basis without damaging them. The machine came with a spare chisel that is sharp and to spec.

    I know there is a long road ahead.

    Quote Originally Posted by michael langman View Post
    That is an interesting machine Brian. Wil enjoy seeing you use it in the future.
    Thank you!
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

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