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Thread: Suggestions for a small outboard powered stitch and glue skiff

  1. #1

    Suggestions for a small outboard powered stitch and glue skiff

    Hey guys.

    Looking for suggestions for a short outboard powered skiff. I would prefer something stitch and glue construction. I have an older Johnson 9.5hp for power.

    A few I have looked at so far:

    Tango 12’. Has really nice lines and looks like it will do well with a small outboard. I do like the transom extensions and how they help keep the boat from squatting under power. My main concern is water getting inside of the rear hull extensions. It also looks like it might be hard to get water back out of the hull - which I am sort of sensitive to after my last boat project resurrecting a 14’ High Tide Bug Buster. That’s a fun, fast hull but it collects water inside and it’s hard to get it back out.

    Glen-l 12’ power skiff also has nice lines and doesn’t look too complicated. Looks like it’s probably easier to clean out after fishing or playing on the sandbar and get water back out of it - which is a big plus.

    Suggestions?

  2. #2
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  3. #3
    Care to narrow it down a bit... There are 670 sets of boat plans listed there. .

    Another decent looking skiff is the Bateau fs12. I think I favor one with a small v in the hull rather than a dead flat bottom like Spira boats show... That way they can handle a little chop... But not so much vee that beaching it for an afternoon out on the sandbar is a chore...

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by John C Cox View Post
    Care to narrow it down a bit... There are 670 sets of boat plans listed there. .

    Another decent looking skiff is the Bateau fs12. I think I favor one with a small v in the hull rather than a dead flat bottom like Spira boats show... That way they can handle a little chop... But not so much vee that beaching it for an afternoon out on the sandbar is a chore...
    I do apologize for giving you more suggestions than you wanted.

    There is a search feature there. You need to do your own research and find what appeals to you. I can't judge what appeals to your tastes. And there are worse ways to spend an evening than browsing boat plans.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  5. #5
    I was going to comment earlier, but decided it would be prudent to check my facts before spouting off. I've done that.

    In my opinion, 9.5 hp is way too much for a 12 foot skiff. Most pro designers and naval architects who design in this size range suggest outboards of 2-2.5 hp and caution against too much power. A few outliers will indicate grudging acceptance of 4 hp outboards, but tend to warn about overpowering their designs. You may need to consider these cautions as you shop for a suitable design and think about larger craft if use of the 9.5 hp is baked into your plans.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  6. #6
    Ah yes. I think we are in 2 different worlds here my friend.

    I am looking for a power boat.....

    I understand that a 10hp is way too much for a small sailing skiff, dory, or pram sort of boat. They can’t do anything with the extra power because of the hull design - so you are just adding weight and noise. You will grenade the motor long before you manage to push it up on plane.

    But..... Power boats not so much... There are several low power skiffs - 10-15hp for a 15’ skiff sort of design that would move them along just fine... My “issue” is that several of these designs seem to leave conventional features worked out over the past several thousand years behind for a more “efficient” designs.... and yet seem to forget basic “Boat stuff” that’s been worked out over thousands of years of people using boats.... Dumb stuff like “Boats need seats”... “Don’t pile up the floor area you need to walk on with weird shaped junk” and last - “It’s going to get water in it - it’s a boat..... Make it so I can get the water back out easily...”.

    I guess such is the curse of designers who don’t build professionally for money.

    And I suppose it says “Look at current production boats - they won’t stay in business if they don’t have most of this stuff worked out.” The low power versions of those are ugly square things and the pretty ones take 50hp to move a 15’ boat....

    *sigh*
    Last edited by John C Cox; 10-02-2018 at 11:42 AM.

  7. #7
    You started with a 12 foot skiff. Now you're talking about a 15 foot skiff. Big difference.

    You might keep in mind that generally volume increases by the cube of the length.

    Lots of power boats have good success removing water via bailers in the transom or aft bottom.

    But it's going to be your boat, so it's up to you. You seem to know what you're looking for, so good luck.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Annapolis, MD
    Posts
    120
    How about the Chesapeake Light Craft Peeler Skiff? Seems to fit your parameters, but I am not a powerboat person (canoes and kayaks are my favorites) so I might be missing something. I have no association with the company, other than being a very satisfied customer.

    https://www.clcboats.com/shop/boats/...wer-skiff.html

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    3,832

  10. #10
    I would really suggest you look at a Candlefish, either 13 or 16. Plans are cheap, and I know skiffs, and this is a nice design. Devlin design.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sd7Z...ature=youtu.be

    Chip is apparently a famous racer but bought a Candlefish 16 for his user boat. He got the 16 and mounted a 60 hp tiller on it!!! Chip's boat has some features that are not standard, like the tabs. The interior is pretty stock, and there is a different option there in the plans. I am really seriously considering this as my next build. Not quite technical enough for me fishing, but for the next few years I think it will suit me both as a fishing skiff and for family. If I can get away with my 15hp Honda, that is probably what I will use, but if I have to buy one, it will probably be a 30, though at the low end, 20 can be more technical for the fishing I do.

    Devlin plans and manual are excellent. I think the plans are 45. My one quibble with his plans is that generally I do not prefer Dynel for sheathing boats, and I would use 10 oz glass unless you plan on dragging it down the road without a trailer. Glass is normally more technical, dynel is more abrasion resistant, but otherwise it doesn't deliver.


    If you are more techie, I would look at http://hogfishdesign.wordpress.com/, Chris kicked off the madness of super expensive skiffs at Hells Bay. But he has many plans that are inspirational for the rest of us. Microskiffs is a great place to go for info, but it can get you lost in a lot of detail.
    Last edited by Roderick Gentry; 12-03-2018 at 12:14 AM.

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