Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Fine Homebuilding Magazine

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Little Hocking, OH
    Posts
    636

    Fine Homebuilding Magazine

    Anyone know of it, to get it?

    Worth it?

  2. #2
    Years ago, used to subscribe. Mainly read the tips section. Now I do this while waiting in line at Lowes. Best tip I ever picked up was to stop a bouncy floor, by running a hanging girder off the bottom of the joists in center of span. PS, they have paid me for a couple tips, but so have several other magazines.

  3. #3
    Long time subscriber. If you do a lot of work around the house and want a source of inspiration and solid how-to info, I think it's worth it. You can always check out some back issues at the library to judge for yourself.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Wrenn View Post
    Years ago, used to subscribe. Mainly read the tips section. Now I do this while waiting in line at Lowes. Best tip I ever picked up was to stop a bouncy floor, by running a hanging girder off the bottom of the joists in center of span. PS, they have paid me for a couple tips, but so have several other magazines.
    Sorry, not to go off topic but... can you elaborate on this tip? I always thought this might work but when I discussed with a structural engineer he said no way would it work. Seems like it would transfer the load to other joists and deaden the bounce a little bit.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
    Posts
    1,619
    I was a charter subscriber, quit for a while after a couple of articles on hay bale houses and such, which didn't fit my criteria for fine homebuilding, then came back on board for the last 15-20 years. I've learned a ton from the articles over the years. It's one of the last subscriptions I maintain. I find the articles more interesting and better written than the Journal of Light Construction. If I were a builder I might prefer the latter, but I like the balance of articles on architecture and design as well as construction techniques. It's helped me through multiple house renovations.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
    Posts
    3,682
    I buy it. Lots of the content is a little too "artsy" or "green" to be practical but it's good to be aware of it. Worth the $ in my opinion.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Berrevoets View Post
    Sorry, not to go off topic but... can you elaborate on this tip? I always thought this might work but when I discussed with a structural engineer he said no way would it work. Seems like it would transfer the load to other joists and deaden the bounce a little bit.
    It probably works about the sames as properly installed bridging or blocking, by tying the joists together.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Fort Smith, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,572
    I scan it from time to time at the check out lines. I can only envy the level of building craftsmanship written about. And as noted it very inspiring. The magazine I'm waiting to subscribe to is "Mediocre Home Building" for folk like me who start projects with wonderful intentions of perfection but in actual process end up compromising for one reason or another.
    Never run with bagpipes. You might put your aye out. Or worse, get kilt.

    The problem with humanity is: we have paleolithic emotions; medieval institutions; and God-like technology.

    I miss DOS when you knew what was on your computer, how it got there and what it did

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Berrevoets View Post
    Sorry, not to go off topic but... can you elaborate on this tip? I always thought this might work but when I discussed with a structural engineer he said no way would it work. Seems like it would transfer the load to other joists and deaden the bounce a little bit.
    Sure. First you build a beam using (2) 2 X 6's tied together. It will be perpendicular to floor joists, and only needs to be about a foot longer than the length measured from first joist to last joist. Using a double 2 X 12 joist hanger, hang one end on the bottom of first joist. Joist hanger will fasten to side of joist. Then go to other end and loosely hang it from joist. Use screws for this connection as it will have to be tightened up later. Then working from starting point, jack beam up so it can be connected to the next joist. Sometimes a couple heavy weigh friends can stand on floor immediately over this spot, helping to press joist down. Lacking a couple heavy weight friends, you can stack bags of sand on floor, helping to force joist down. Again, fasten beam to joist using double 2 X 12 hangers. Work your way across the room, connecting the joist one at the time. Sometimes you get a joist that you can't force down to meet beam, then use a wedge on top after fastening hanger. This will prevent squeaks. It's basically a "hanging girder" that is unsupported at the ends, meaning it doesn't rest upon foundation.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    6,785
    Blog Entries
    1

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Bellingham, Washington
    Posts
    1,149
    I subscribed for all the years I was a builder. Got many useful ideas and felt it was a good investment. Didn't hurt that subscription cost was deductible business expense.
    Bracken's Pond Woodworks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •