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Thread: Tool rust prevention

  1. #16
    Stan, I'm very sorry for your loss. That must've been very hard.

    One thing I have been experimenting with for rust reduction/prevention is wiping clear finishes on my metal tools. So far, a thin, well-rubbed-in coat of wipe on poly seems to last 6-8 months - which is better than I get from waxing. You might tryy it on a chisel or two and see if it helps.

    Best of luck to you. I hope this all gets better, soon.
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Redding, CA (That's in superior Calif.)
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    812
    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    Stan, I'm very sorry for your loss. That must've been very hard.

    One thing I have been experimenting with for rust reduction/prevention is wiping clear finishes on my metal tools. So far, a thin, well-rubbed-in coat of wipe on poly seems to last 6-8 months - which is better than I get from waxing. You might tryy it on a chisel or two and see if it helps.

    Best of luck to you. I hope this all gets better, soon.
    Fred
    Thanks, Fred. Glad to hear of something new to try from someone that has experience with it. I'll try it on 6 chisels to start. I'm thinking of building some shallow drawers with hinged tops for the chisels. Wipe-on poly sounds like a lot less work. Are you using satin or gloss finish?

    I really like that Burke quote.

    Cheers
    Project Salvager

    The key to the gateway of wisdom is to know that you don't know.______Stan Smith

  3. #18
    Hi Stan. I think it was gloss but satin should work too, I'd think.
    Let us know whether or not this works for you.
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  4. #19
    Here's a link to what appears to be a very comprehensive test of 46 rust inhibitors. http://www.dayattherange.com/?page_id=3667 It's slanted toward gun enthusiasts, but rust doesn't seem to care. I'm mostly using the WD-40 Specialist stuff largely because I can get it at the Borg, although it's not cheap, and the spray dispenser seems cleverly designed to waste it. And bear in mind I'm in Tucson where it really is a dry heat.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    sykesville, maryland
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    Another solution is talcum powder. Some WW swear by it. I just started using it (in addition to oil/paste wax). I'm told the talc absorbs the moisture, so the steel cannot. I think a little talc goes a long way when applied with a chalk board erasure.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Redding, CA (That's in superior Calif.)
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    812
    Some good ideas here. Thanks so much. I'm starting with satin wipe-on poly. I have a large can of it. The rust isn't coming back on some of the tools that I used wax on. I'm thinking that I may have buffed off too much of the wax. I sprayed my band saw table with T9 yesterday. It's taking a long time to dry and the temp is over 82 in the garage. We have a high desert climate here with low humidity most of the time in summer. It's a dry heat. The high will be 101 tomorrow, but 3 digit temps are quite common. Easy Wood sent me a new parting tool because mine was damaged while being moved after the fire. It was already starting to get some rust. I removed it with the Dremel and coated it with wipe-on poly right away. Thanks for all the comments.
    Project Salvager

    The key to the gateway of wisdom is to know that you don't know.______Stan Smith

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Don Peters View Post
    Here's a link to what appears to be a very comprehensive test of 46 rust inhibitors. http://www.dayattherange.com/?page_id=3667 It's slanted toward gun enthusiasts, but rust doesn't seem to care. I'm mostly using the WD-40 Specialist stuff largely because I can get it at the Borg, although it's not cheap, and the spray dispenser seems cleverly designed to waste it. And bear in mind I'm in Tucson where it really is a dry heat.
    Thank you, Don! That link you provided is the most comprehensive test I have ever seen. Since moving to Florida, rust has really become an issue.

    It would be interesting to see how top rust inhibitors in the test, Frog Lube and WD 40 Specialist, perform for the woodworker with information on if they transfer to bare wood and if they interact negatively with applying a finish later on.
    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness..." - Mark Twain

    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Hilo, Hawaii
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    157
    I spray a thin coat of the below on cast iron tables when I won’t use the machine for a week or more. 8FD27F5C-3CFC-4188-AE72-DA6E19F6342C.jpg

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Mac View Post
    I used Johnson's a ton this summer in KC and my tools rusted a lot. I was feverishly applying it and it wouldn't stop the rust. Not a huge deal, but it makes me sad everytime I look at my table saw top.
    I live in a climate that 1/2 the year has rain forest type humidity. I quit using wax a number of years ago.

    That said, as many have attested, wax can work, but IMO not in every shop and every climate. I could be wrong, but my take is wax can't totally prevent rust because it can't completely seal off oxygen from the metal. Condensation can still form under the wax.

    The more frequently you use your machines, the less problems you'll have. (I think this is the #1 preventer of rust!!)

    So Jacob, here's what works for me (even now in the most humid time of the year):

    1. Keep shop closed up at night.
    2. Leave a fan running.
    3. When you do see rust, sand it off right away, apply WD40 or a rust remover solution, clean with brake cleaner and apply a protectant.
    4. Keep your machines coated with a petroleum based product like Boeshield.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Redding, CA (That's in superior Calif.)
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    812
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Engel View Post
    I live in a climate that 1/2 the year has rain forest type humidity. I quit using wax a number of years ago.

    That said, as many have attested, wax can work, but IMO not in every shop and every climate. I could be wrong, but my take is wax can't totally prevent rust because it can't completely seal off oxygen from the metal. Condensation can still form under the wax.

    The more frequently you use your machines, the less problems you'll have. (I think this is the #1 preventer of rust!!)

    So Jacob, here's what works for me (even now in the most humid time of the year):

    1. Keep shop closed up at night.
    2. Leave a fan running.
    3. When you do see rust, sand it off right away, apply WD40 or a rust remover solution, clean with brake cleaner and apply a protectant.
    4. Keep your machines coated with a petroleum based product like Boeshield.
    My table saw top has held up fine with the T9 Boeshield and moving blanket (folded double). I bought another one for $4.99 from HF yesterday for my band saw top and lathe bed. I'll have to cut the blanket to fit. I got this tip from a youtube a guy in Florida did. I'm will using the wipe-on poly on the chisels--so far no rust.
    Project Salvager

    The key to the gateway of wisdom is to know that you don't know.______Stan Smith

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Redding, CA (That's in superior Calif.)
    Posts
    812
    Okay, I'm finally there. As a poster noted above, the wax may have stuff trapped underneath? Not sure about that, but I've gone back and used the 300 grit scrubbers with my Dremel. Then I immediately apply a liberal coat of wipe-on poly and allow it to dry overnight. So far, there has been no rust returning. I'm doing about 5-7 chisels at a time. A previous poster said the wipe-on poly lasts about 6 months. I guess that depends on how much use the chisels get also. My Harrison Specialties carbide chisels' are the least affected. I think the shafts on them are coated with a material resistant to rust. I have seen variations of the tool finish between manufacturers also. I think all are HSS except the carbide cutting tools. Some of my Easy Wood tools' shafts are non-magnetic. I was going to re-use my magnetic strip tool holders, but bought new ones instead since the strips had very bad rust.

    Needless to say, this has been a very arduous task. I thank all who posted with their valuable suggestions. Had I known about the wipe-on poly when I started cleaning, I could have saved many hours. Live and learn my friends and be thankful for your many blessings - and this forum in particular.
    Project Salvager

    The key to the gateway of wisdom is to know that you don't know.______Stan Smith

  12. #27
    Julie,
    WD-40 Specialist is greasy kid stuff. Goes on like TriFlow and spreads easily, but I wipe it twice to almost dry. Probably best to leave it pretty slippery wet in Florida for best results. I'd be pretty careful about cleaning it off of glued/finished surfaces though. I have no experience with Frog Lube.

    Regarding talc: While it is dramatically hydroscopic, that water soaked talc remains on the surface with nothing to prevent moisture transfer back to the surface. Your wax job better be pretty thorough.

    dp

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    6,439
    I wrap my files in aluminum foil and they do not rust. I use wax on my other tools.

  14. #29
    Stan,

    Storing your hand tools is the key.

    A couple things that have worked for me

    1. Rust inhibitive drawer liners. I do think they actually help.
    2. Sealed cabinet or plastic bin with a moisture absorber. Camphor cubes also work as well as a product sold by Lee Valley (I believe).
    3. Humidity rods. I've used these before but they seem to be nothing more than little heater. I didnt' think they worked too well.

    Until I was able to move all my hand tools into a climate controlled room, it was a constant issue. Ultimately, what worked best for me was a sealed cabinet lined with the liners as well as a tub of Damp Rid. The hygrometer never got below 60% RH. I would always find a little spot of rust somewhere everytime I pulled a tool out.

    I used the rubber abrasive erasers, applied a little rust remover and coated with Boeshield before I put them up.

  15. #30
    I just keep an oily rag by my tool chest and occasionally give things a wipe. But I live in a drier climate.

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