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Thread: Which blade for this curve?

  1. #1
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    Which blade for this curve?

    2-1/2" and 4" cherry, a circular arc of unknown radius, but with a chord length of 20" and a center rise of 1-1/4", so about 24" radius.

    We've no other blade for this older 12" Jet saw other than the worn out 1/4" that's on it.

    Looking for the tooth specs and width.

  2. #2
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    I think you are off a bit and radius about 40". At least that is what a calculator suggested.

    I would use a 3/8" or 1/2" blade with 3-4 teeth per inch.

  3. #3
    my calculations say that's a 40.625" radius...

    I use a router for that type of work held in a sled and pivoting from a simple nail

    in fact, I just made a cabinet with an arched top with a radius of 60" and also of course routed the back of the cabinet along with the arched face frame cap. I haven't used any sort of saw for that type of work since I was a framer on a production crew over 25 years ago.

  4. #4
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    You could cut even a 20" radius with a 1" blade as long as the blade had a "normal" amount of set so any blade the 12" Jet can mount and tension is more than narrow enough to work.

    On that saw, I would simply use a 1/4" 4tpi raker hook blade. On a bigger saw, I would use a 3/8" or 1/2" 3tpi. You need an aggressive tooth and low TPI to allow the Jet to chew through up to 4" of wood.
    5,306 miles from where the greatest things with 4 wheels are born
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    5,301 miles from where the greatest things with 2 wheels and a band are born
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  5. #5
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    I would use a bandsaw not a circular saw. A thin kerf blade may get bent. I would do it in multiple shallow passes
    Bill D.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I would use a bandsaw not a circular saw. A thin kerf blade may get bent. I would do it in multiple shallow passes
    Bill D.
    What???? Everybody IS talking about a bandsaw. And how do you do multiple shallow passes on a bandsaw? That's router technique.

  7. #7
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    Is this a one time cut? or do you need to make a bunch of these pieces.
    Like Van stated, I'd probably use a 1/4" blade also, but 3/8" wouldn't be out of the question.

    If the chord, radius, and height, are critical dimensions, you're going to need to make either a circle jig, or a radius cutter. Trying to follow the line on that one could get sloppy. That's a little bit over a 1 meter radius for reference.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 09-15-2018 at 5:45 PM.
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  8. #8
    You can certainly cut the needed radius with the 1/4" blade you have. Why not just sharpen it? That would take you only 20-30 minutes and you don't even need to remove it for the process. There are several videos on Youtube showing how to do it.

  9. #9
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    I took him to mean a 12" tablesaw with a wide kerf blade. If he has a bandsaw I do not see why he would ask how to make a curved cut.
    Bill D

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gene Davis View Post
    2-1/2" and 4" cherry, a circular arc of unknown radius, but with a chord length of 20" and a center rise of 1-1/4", so about 24" radius.

    We've no other blade for this older 12" Jet saw other than the worn out 1/4" that's on it.

    Looking for the tooth specs and width.
    "1/4" blade", "tooth specs and width" That does sound like a bandsaw, not a tablesaw or circular saw.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I took him to mean a 12" tablesaw with a wide kerf blade. If he has a bandsaw I do not see why he would ask how to make a curved cut.
    Bill D
    I am pretty sure your assumptions are wrong. When you hear hoofbeats don't think zebras. He is asking HOW to make a curved cut just the proper blade to use for a particular curved cut.
    5,306 miles from where the greatest things with 4 wheels are born
    5,328 miles from where the greatest things with 2 wheels are born
    5,301 miles from where the greatest things with 2 wheels and a band are born
    Seems to be more than a coincidence to me...

  12. #12
    Hi Gene,

    Since your 1/4" blade is worn already, a new blade is in the cards at the least. I believe your question is to what blade to get. Your 12" saw is going to be a bit on the low end of power for a cutting height of 4" or 2-1/2". My old 12" saw would do 4" material at a slow feed rate with a 3-4 tooth (TPI) blade with the thinnest kerf I could find in a 3/8" blade. A 1/4" blade would do fine as well but, lower tooth counts can be hard to find in 1/4"; 6TPI being the lowest I usually run into.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
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