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Thread: Which blade for this curve?

  1. #1
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    Which blade for this curve?

    2-1/2" and 4" cherry, a circular arc of unknown radius, but with a chord length of 20" and a center rise of 1-1/4", so about 24" radius.

    We've no other blade for this older 12" Jet saw other than the worn out 1/4" that's on it.

    Looking for the tooth specs and width.

  2. #2
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    I think you are off a bit and radius about 40". At least that is what a calculator suggested.

    I would use a 3/8" or 1/2" blade with 3-4 teeth per inch.

  3. #3
    my calculations say that's a 40.625" radius...

    I use a router for that type of work held in a sled and pivoting from a simple nail

    in fact, I just made a cabinet with an arched top with a radius of 60" and also of course routed the back of the cabinet along with the arched face frame cap. I haven't used any sort of saw for that type of work since I was a framer on a production crew over 25 years ago.

  4. #4
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    You could cut even a 20" radius with a 1" blade as long as the blade had a "normal" amount of set so any blade the 12" Jet can mount and tension is more than narrow enough to work.

    On that saw, I would simply use a 1/4" 4tpi raker hook blade. On a bigger saw, I would use a 3/8" or 1/2" 3tpi. You need an aggressive tooth and low TPI to allow the Jet to chew through up to 4" of wood.
    Of all the laws Brandolini's may be the most universally true.

    Deep thought for the day:

    Your bandsaw weighs more when you leave the spring compressed instead of relieving the tension.

  5. #5
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    I would use a bandsaw not a circular saw. A thin kerf blade may get bent. I would do it in multiple shallow passes
    Bill D.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I would use a bandsaw not a circular saw. A thin kerf blade may get bent. I would do it in multiple shallow passes
    Bill D.
    What???? Everybody IS talking about a bandsaw. And how do you do multiple shallow passes on a bandsaw? That's router technique.

  7. #7
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    Is this a one time cut? or do you need to make a bunch of these pieces.
    Like Van stated, I'd probably use a 1/4" blade also, but 3/8" wouldn't be out of the question.

    If the chord, radius, and height, are critical dimensions, you're going to need to make either a circle jig, or a radius cutter. Trying to follow the line on that one could get sloppy. That's a little bit over a 1 meter radius for reference.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 09-15-2018 at 6:45 PM.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  8. #8
    You can certainly cut the needed radius with the 1/4" blade you have. Why not just sharpen it? That would take you only 20-30 minutes and you don't even need to remove it for the process. There are several videos on Youtube showing how to do it.

  9. #9
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    I took him to mean a 12" tablesaw with a wide kerf blade. If he has a bandsaw I do not see why he would ask how to make a curved cut.
    Bill D

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gene Davis View Post
    2-1/2" and 4" cherry, a circular arc of unknown radius, but with a chord length of 20" and a center rise of 1-1/4", so about 24" radius.

    We've no other blade for this older 12" Jet saw other than the worn out 1/4" that's on it.

    Looking for the tooth specs and width.
    "1/4" blade", "tooth specs and width" That does sound like a bandsaw, not a tablesaw or circular saw.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I took him to mean a 12" tablesaw with a wide kerf blade. If he has a bandsaw I do not see why he would ask how to make a curved cut.
    Bill D
    I am pretty sure your assumptions are wrong. When you hear hoofbeats don't think zebras. He is asking HOW to make a curved cut just the proper blade to use for a particular curved cut.
    Of all the laws Brandolini's may be the most universally true.

    Deep thought for the day:

    Your bandsaw weighs more when you leave the spring compressed instead of relieving the tension.

  12. #12
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    Hi Gene,

    Since your 1/4" blade is worn already, a new blade is in the cards at the least. I believe your question is to what blade to get. Your 12" saw is going to be a bit on the low end of power for a cutting height of 4" or 2-1/2". My old 12" saw would do 4" material at a slow feed rate with a 3-4 tooth (TPI) blade with the thinnest kerf I could find in a 3/8" blade. A 1/4" blade would do fine as well but, lower tooth counts can be hard to find in 1/4"; 6TPI being the lowest I usually run into.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


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