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Thread: Hammer K3 has arrived...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    481

    Hammer K3 has arrived...

    My Hammer K3 Winner 79x48 arrived yesterday. The 890 pound crate arrived with no problems, although it was a little harrowing watching it being lowered down on the lift gate. Rolling it up my driveway and into the garage took some muscle, but we got it. Everything appears to have made the trip without taking any damage; just like with my A3-31, they really know how to pack these things.

    K3W.jpg

    I removed some of the wrapping last night and carried all of the "loose" pieces down into my shop. One piece is left inside the main saw cabinet; I believe that's the smaller miter fence, as I didn't notice that in the stuff I already carried. I will dig that out today.

    Because this unit has the outrigger support already installed (facing camera in picture, just above paper with numbers on it), the saw cabinet itself is wider than my basement entry door (which is at the bottom of a set of steep bilco stairs). That means I'm going to be looking at removing that door temporarily. Even without the outrigger support it would be really tight, so that door would probably have been coming off anyway. The pallet itself is also way too wide, so I either need to cut that down smaller or transfer the cabinet to another pallet or piece of plywood.

    My dad is going to be coming over today to take a look, and we're going to come up with a plan for sliding this down the stairs on a ramp, as well as looking into removing the door. With the steepness of the ramp and the need to flatten out at the bottom, I am a little worried that the ends of the sliding table might contact the ramp. But I should be able to figure out the risk of that using a little trigonometry.

    Anyway, I'm excited and can't wait to get this thing into my shop, which should hopefully happen in just over a week given availability of people that will be involved.
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    46,104
    Congratulations, Steve! I'm looking forward to seeing that excellent machine in your shop! Bummer about the door, but ya gotta do what ya gotta do!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    634
    Can’t wait to see it in place. Congrats!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    46,104
    This delivery must have been why I saw such a bright light over Steve's neighborhood. LOL
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. Quote Originally Posted by Steve Wurster View Post
    Because this unit has the outrigger support already installed (facing camera in picture, just above paper with numbers on it), the saw cabinet itself is wider than my basement entry door (which is at the bottom of a set of steep bilco stairs). That means I'm going to be looking at removing that door temporarily. Even without the outrigger support it would be really tight, so that door would probably have been coming off anyway.
    I had to take mine down a basement stair and through 4 doors, I know your pain.

    First thing, if you plan on removing the carriage, make sure you loctite the nuts underneath the carriage, closest to the machine, sharpie all around the nuts on the cabinet and inside the cabinet, and then only remove the nuts inside the cabinet. That way, you will preserve the alignment of the carriage height wise and length wise. You can remove the sharpie with a little rubbing alcohol when done.

    For the outrigger, same principle. You only want to remove the nuts inside the cabinet, that way you don't need to realign the boom when done. I also sharpied the nuts and shoulders inside and around the disks at the top and bottom outside but somehow if felt less critical, they naturally came back right where they were.

    As for the ramps, I took four 2x8 that I glued together and cut like a stair stringer and it sits right on the stairs (like a mirror of the stringer really), worked like a charm and helps spread the weight over a longer span. I then used moving dollies like those below and rolled the machine downstairs on the 2x8.

    https://www.amazon.com/Strongway-Furniture-Crate-Mover-Set/dp/B073VQZVTQ

    I had it secured to the wall upstairs and was letting some chain go, bit by bit.

    That way, I was able to get it through a narrow door and even with steep steps, nothing hit the floor.

    Hope this helps!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Wurster View Post
    My Hammer K3 Winner 79x48 arrived yesterday. The 890 pound crate arrived with no problems, although it was a little harrowing watching it being lowered down on the lift gate.
    When they delivered my C3, the pallet JUST fit the footprint of the liftgate. The driver devised this plan (without telling me): he got it on the pallet jack, got the machine+pallet jack moving as quickly as he could out the back of the truck, then jumped out of the way as the wheels of the pallet jack fell off the end of the lift gate (and the pallet "plopped" squarely on the lift gate). He thought this was ingenious and funny. I did not think it was funny

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Florida
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    634
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    When they delivered my C3, the pallet JUST fit the footprint of the liftgate. The driver devised this plan (without telling me): he got it on the pallet jack, got the machine+pallet jack moving as quickly as he could out the back of the truck, then jumped out of the way as the wheels of the pallet jack fell off the end of the lift gate (and the pallet "plopped" squarely on the lift gate). He thought this was ingenious and funny. I did not think it was funny

    Sounds like the way way they always do my stuff. Let it roll right to the edge and either drop the pallet jack or let wheels fall off the lift. Scares the heck out of me every time as I watch the whole lift gate, pallet and contents sway back and forth on the way to the ground. Just hope I don’t have to test the insurance of any of these folks one day. Ugh.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
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    481
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    This delivery must have been why I saw such a bright light over Steve's neighborhood. LOL
    That was me... standing in my bilco stairs with a flashlight trying to figure out how I'm going to remove this door!
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    481
    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastien La Madeleine View Post
    I had to take mine down a basement stair and through 4 doors, I know your pain.

    First thing, if you plan on removing the carriage, make sure you loctite the nuts underneath the carriage, closest to the machine, sharpie all around the nuts on the cabinet and inside the cabinet, and then only remove the nuts inside the cabinet. That way, you will preserve the alignment of the carriage height wise and length wise. You can remove the sharpie with a little rubbing alcohol when done.

    For the outrigger, same principle. You only want to remove the nuts inside the cabinet, that way you don't need to realign the boom when done. I also sharpied the nuts and shoulders inside and around the disks at the top and bottom outside but somehow if felt less critical, they naturally came back right where they were.

    As for the ramps, I took four 2x8 that I glued together and cut like a stair stringer and it sits right on the stairs (like a mirror of the stringer really), worked like a charm and helps spread the weight over a longer span. I then used moving dollies like those below and rolled the machine downstairs on the 2x8.

    https://www.amazon.com/Strongway-Furniture-Crate-Mover-Set/dp/B073VQZVTQ

    I had it secured to the wall upstairs and was letting some chain go, bit by bit.

    That way, I was able to get it through a narrow door and even with steep steps, nothing hit the floor.

    Hope this helps!

    I do not plan on removing the sliding table. There's really no benefit to me doing that, since it doesn't stick out on the left side at all, and the track it rides on sticks out on the front and back far enough that you don't save much by removing the table.

    I might consider removing the outrigger support if I cannot get the door opening wide enough, but I'd rather remove an entire door structure than mess with an already calibrated tool.

    For ramps I plan on building a ladder-type structure out of plywood that will lay flat on the stairs, with side walls that will keep the cabinet lined up. Those movers look interesting... I'm going to stop by some tool rental places this week to see what options are available.

    Thanks.
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    612
    That saw, or a Minimax equivalent, is my dream saw. I would love to hear your thoughts on it after you get some hours on it.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Darmstadt, Germany
    Posts
    262
    When I moved my equipment to the basement, I made a set of three spacers that would create a plane that spanned four of the stair treads at a time. I used a sheet of 18mm plywood, about 1 x 1.5 meters, over the spacers to create a large platform for resting the equipment while the chain hoist was repositioned for the next move. I confirmed with the stair company that each tread was designed for a 450kG load, but didn't take any chances and put T-braces under each tread on the basement run. Since I planned on having three others help me move the Minimax SC2 only partially disassembled, the combined load on the bottom stairs would be high. When the time came to move the SC2, some of my help wasn't available, so I had to disassemble it even more so two people could move each section.

    Here is an image of the three spacers in place on one section of the basement steps. These were made from construction timber I bought at the local hardware store. I used pocket screws and glue to hold everything together. The bottom of each spacer has non-slip foam I bought from Harbor Freight on one of my trips back to the States.


    Stairs-1 by Mike66GE, on Flickr


    Here is a close-up showing the internal braces I used to lock the three sections together to minimize racking. The braces are attached to each spacer with a hinge to make it easy to align with the brace from the next spacer. I used a clamp to hold two strips toghter. When I started moving the equipment, I realized I didn't need these connecting braces, as the width of each spacer was wide enough to make it stable.


    Stairs-2 by Mike66GE, on Flickr


    Here is an image showing a piece of 18mm plywood covering the spacers and stair tread. This is a piece from the actual sheet used during the move, and I've been whittling away at it for other projects. The original size easily covered the three spacers and one tread. The sheet extended beyond the tread and last spacer and provided plenty of room for the SC2 and me to stand on while repositioning the chain hoist.


    Stairs-3 by Mike66GE, on Flickr


    The stair section going from the ground floor to the upper floor is identical, and I was able to use it for the chain hoist to lift and move the equipment to the next set of steps. I used this block, also with non-slip material on the base, to increase the radius for the strap that held the chain hoist.


    Stairs-4 by Mike66GE, on Flickr


    We were able to move two treads at a time, and it took about five minutes to reposition the chain hoist, lift the load, reposition the spacers and plywood, and lower the load to the next level. The heaviest part of the SC2 was the cast iron section with the motor and cart. The concrete counterweight was the next heaviest, and we didn't use the the spacers or chain hoist for the chassis.


    MM-SC2-1 by Mike66GE, on Flickr


    Here's a video of Marius Hornberger and his K3. His stairs are similar (if not identical) to mine and the move down the stairs starts at about 1:19.


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    2,349
    Mike, those blocks for getting it down the stairs are awesome.

    Erik

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    481
    Mike, those blocks are really cool. Unfortunately for me my stairs have nothing above them, as they are exit stairs that exist completely on the outside of my house. No place to put a chain hoist!
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Winterville, NC (eastern NC)
    Posts
    1,889
    I agree that Hammer/Felder really know how to package a machine for transport. I saved all the 2 X 4 lumber from the crate of the A3-41 I just received; impressive thought went into protecting the unit.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    481
    FYI: This is what the opening now looks like at the bottom of my bilco stairs. That door came out pretty easily, and I should be able to put it back without much difficulty. That opening is 34", which should just *barely* be enough for the saw to slide through. Next step is building the ramp, which I will get to later this week.

    basement.jpg
    And there was trouble, taking place...

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