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Thread: Switching between normal TV speaker sound and an Audio/Visual system?

  1. #1
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    Switching between normal TV speaker sound and an Audio/Visual system?

    I am thinking about making the break from my normal 2 channel stereo and tv setup to a simple home theatre 5.1 system with just an AV receiver, Blu Ray player and 5.1 speaker system. I'm thinking of using a Yamaha TSR-5830 for the receiver (or something along those lines).

    My initial question is more general - in terms of hook-up, it seems the easiest way to handle it is to use all HDMI. One HDMI from the cable box into the receiver, another HDMI from the Blu-Ray into the receiver, and a third HDMI from the receiver into the TV? But this would not allow me to switch from the home theater sound to just the normal TV sound speakers? I know it seems silly, but the television is used mainly for news, a few sitcoms, and cartoons with the grandkids – things I would like not to waste the extra power consumption of the AV receiver, etc on.

    I'd like to be able to switch between the television speakers and the home theater system easily. Unfortunately, I think our DirectTV DVR box does not have more that one HDMI out - otherwise that may have taken care of this? So what is the best way to do this? Preferably still using all HDMI to keep the number of cables down to a minimum?
    Last edited by Bruce Page; 09-14-2018 at 12:32 PM. Reason: transposed model number
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  2. #2
    I use a similar Yamaha and have for maybe 10 years or so. Features that I would not want to do without:
    • The YPAO makes it almost too easy to setup.
    • HDMI upscaling is nice for some source material
    • Good mix of inputs and outputs although your use is a lot like mine:
      • Single TV being used as a monitor
      • inputs from Cable, Disc and a small PC I use for online viewing

    • Lots of speaker tweaks to optimize various types of speaker setups

    As to switching back and forth from HDMI to internal speakers? that is buried in the TV's menu but, is a non-issue once you get there. Your TV may differ. I have no vested interest here. It just so happens I have been using a Yamaha with similar, although somewhat dated (no 4K for example) features.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 09-14-2018 at 9:07 AM.
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  3. #3
    My Samsung smart tv has a menu selection that allows you to select the av receiver or the tv speakers.

  4. #4
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    Maybe a tad OT but for information purposes. We recently bought a new Sony OLED tv that has no physical speakers so they tell me and I can't find any so it must be true, apparently the screen is the speaker. The sound that comes out of this thing is extraordinary to say the least, I was playing music through it the other day and wondered why anyone would need to hook up additional speakers to it for casual listening or viewing.
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  5. #5
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    Depending upon the age / capabilities of your reciever, the alternative way to wiire it is HDMi from Cable / Satelite / internet to TV, and HDMI from Blu-Ray to TV, and us the External out to your reciever (for audio).

    Personally, I had a monitor rather than a TV for years and don’t like the sound from a TV and thusly run everything the way you describe. I do have to turn on three devices. But I really only end up manipulating the reciever remote - using the reciever sound at all times.

    My wife and I ran an experiment last not on the reciever sound using our turntable (yes some of us still have and continue to purchase vinyl). We purchased an new vinyl album at a concert Tuesday. Running it through straight stereo, we found it hard mixed to separate channels (e.g. bass and kick drums one side, guitars and snares, on other and only vocals on both channels. I find the mixing irritating. But when I switched it to a 5:1 audio decoding (recoding since it is an analog input?), the mix improved dramatically. When I switched to an older album that was mixed very well (Pink Floyd’s, Dark Side of the Moon, the straight stereo was better or at least equal than the 5:1. My point is that modern receivers can help with definition and other audio processing. Given this, I still choose to run all my audio through the receiver.

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  6. #6
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    IMO once you start using the 5.1ch sound system you won't ever want to use the TV speakers again even for news.
    It's really not going to affect the electric bill.
    A universal remote is worth the money.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    Maybe a tad OT but for information purposes. We recently bought a new Sony OLED tv that has no physical speakers so they tell me and I can't find any so it must be true, apparently the screen is the speaker. The sound that comes out of this thing is extraordinary to say the least, I was playing music through it the other day and wondered why anyone would need to hook up additional speakers to it for casual listening or viewing.
    I just got a Sony 940F & am very impressed with the onboard sound. Of course, it doesn't have the volume or chest kicking bass needed for movies, but for casual watching such as the news, it is very acceptable.

    I also considered using just the TV sound some of the time, but it's a bit of a hassle to switch back & forth. Most modern AV equipment doesn't use much power if the volume is low, so I doubt if I'd save more than a few pennies a month. I will however leave the sub-woofer amp turned off though cause it's a 1500W amp.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Hinton View Post
    IMO once you start using the 5.1ch sound system you won't ever want to use the TV speakers again even for news.
    It's really not going to affect the electric bill.
    A universal remote is worth the money.
    Agree 100%.

    My main front speakers are a pair of Klipsch Lascala's. There's no way I want to listen to the TV's built in speakers, even for news

    Regards, Rod

  9. #9
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    All HDMI is the way to go due to the ability for the devices to communicate with each other and it does away with separate analog audio cables. I have the Yamaha RX V-681 teamed with a Samsung curved screen smart TV and an Xfinity X1 cable box. One button on my Xfinity (voice activated) remote turns on both the TV and receiver. I had to ditch my old Harmony programmable as they couldn't keep up with all of the features on the new receiver and X1 box. But I still need the way-to-simple Samsung remote to best use the smart TV functions like Amazon, Netflix and YouTube. I have an old JBL Northfield surround speaker set with a SVS 12" sub. Sometimes things do get messed up and a visitor might have trouble sorting out the sound/video combinations, but they are usually to at least get the TV speakers turned up.

    In my case I go HDMI from the cable box to the TV, then digital optical audio out from the TV to the receiver. That way I can always watch TV without the receiver if necessary. HDMI from the BluRay to the receiver, and HDMI from the receiver to the TV to watch BluRay. Also any surround audio available from smart TV sources are routed to the receiver for decoding. Of course the turntable, VCR, CD player are all analog, no HDMI there.

    As an aside, most folks are more interested in phone or internet based audio sources these days and in doing so, generally give up CD or vinyl lossless quality for compressed audio.
    Last edited by Ole Anderson; 09-14-2018 at 11:47 AM.
    NOW you tell me...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gil Kennedy View Post
    My Samsung smart tv has a menu selection that allows you to select the av receiver or the tv speakers.
    Ah, that would be ideal.
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  11. #11
    I would use HDMI for all connections and a receiver with standby pass-through, which will allow TV watching without your receiver/speakers.

  12. #12
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    Yes, I have recently come to learn that. Unfortunately the Yamaha receiver I purchased does not have that feature.
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  13. #13
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    Many One box units house Class D amplifiers(digital amp is incorrect terminology). Class D amps contain analogue switching devices and turn the analogue signal into Pulse Width Modulation.
    The efficiency is over 90%, so very little power is used at idle and their very efficient even with volume cranked.

    I build all of my own amps and design and build my own loudspeakers and have great interest in highest performance sound, including the strong opinions that come with it

    Anyway, I'm planning a 5.1 system and will only use center channel sound for news etc, while keeping the other channels turned off..
    I have the 5.1 device in link below and will run it with 6 mono Class D amps - Switch on Center Channel amp for news. -
    The system is based around a computer server

    Also, with DIY, the price-performance ratio is very high.

    Here's one example of Class D amp - Needs a Power supply and a case - eBay item # 311685758233



    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Bran...78694c4d75Ma1M
    Last edited by Bruce Page; 09-20-2018 at 7:23 PM. Reason: Removerd eBay link per TOS

  14. #14
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    If you have HDMI (ARC) on your TV and Yamaha receiver then you can use this connection to connect the TV to the receiver. I won't attempt to summarize or even explain the advantages but you can look it up on the internet. It is ubiquitous these days. Because I do use this connection between TV and Yamaha receiver, I can tell you that you can turn off the receiver and then the TV speakers come on. They also come on before the system switches to the speakers plugged into the receiver. Roku is plugged into the TV. Music on USB is plugged into the receiver.

    The thing I do not like, and I don't know if it is because I use this feature, is that the Yamaha receiver's Bluetooth does not work well with my Bluetooth headset. It either doesn't work or audio gets out of sink with the video. I have quit using my headset because of the hassle. I now rely on CC for just about everything. Even though I have current hearing aids that are easily adjusted using my phone to fine tune to an audo source, I still need help. Between CC and hearing aids I get most of the audio. I don't hear the music very well but I do feel the vibrations and thumps from the speakers which, to me, enhances the experience.

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