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Thread: Cabinet saw or slider for a hobbyist?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    6,012
    Jesse, I can only echo "me too". 12 months ago I was debating between a SawStop (with sliding cross-cut table) and a Hammer K3 with 49" slider. These were comparable in price. The K3 won out, and there has not been any post purchase trauma.

    One can lock the slider, and then you have a cabinet saw and use the rip fence (which is excellent). In regard to the slider, and how it works, Google for information/videos on the Fritz and Franz jig. That alone will sell you on it.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    47,687
    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse Brown View Post
    I think this is my biggest concern, along with the fact that Sawstop seems very consumer-oriented, while the Euro slider companies aren't so much. At least that's my perception. Dado is nice to have, but I can live without it.
    My MiniMax slider supports a normal dado stack...I've never felt the need to use one, although I recently bought a nearly new one from another SMC community member and plan on setting up an insert to use it in my copious free time.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    used dadoes in saws many times, can you use the newer adjustable width insert heads in them instead of old style dadoes and do they work any better. Id assume cross cutting ply they should be cleaner.

  4. #19
    I have the Hammer K3 winner, 79" stroke, and now would probably buy the 49" stroke saw, as I can not cut a full length sheet on the sliding table, and use the rip fence for long cuts, and 49" will crosscut a full sheet. What I really like is using the slider to crosscut panels. A year ago I made a bunch of blocks for my grandkids, and glued up a bunch of scrap wood, was able to set the rip fence, square up the strips and then use the rip fence as a stop so could cut the blocks all 3 ways, width, thickness, and length without changing the fence, and the blocks are able to be stacked no matter which direction and they match. I did pull the fence back so the blocks when crosscut did not catch between blade and fence.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,178
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Definitely a slider.
    The capacity, capability and accuracy is far better than a cabinet safe, not to mention the improved safety......Rod.
    What Rod and others have said; for speed, accuracy and efficiency a slider absolutely makes sense for a professional shop, but if a non-professional has the money and space it will make life so much easier. N.b.: A smaller slider, suitable for crosscutting sheet goods, needs more left to right room than front to back.

  6. #21
    Cabinet saw for me. I don't have the space or funds for anything more anytime soon. While I could physically fit one in my shop, I'm not willing to surrender what I would have to give up to fit it in.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh, Australia
    Posts
    2,180
    The largest number of TS injuries is from kick back and Saw Stop haven't worked out how to eliminate that yet. Used with an F&F jig the slider eliminates hand/blade injuries and also eliminates kick back. I use the slider to cut solid wood and it is a rare day I have to use the rip fence for its primary purpose and mine is only a short stroke machine. I don't think the learning curve is all that steep TBH as there is a large amount of video material now available and Hammer is doing a series of project videos which are good to watch. I have yet to hear someone who regretted buying a European slider or even an Asian copy of one.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    94
    This is like asking if you should buy a Lexus or a Lambo to drive to work. Both will get you to the office, but the Lambo will get you the attention from the hot chicks in the convertibles.
    Or in the table saw's case... the Hammer C3 will get you the wolf whistles from your neighbor Doris


    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse Brown View Post
    What do you think? Is a slider more than shop jewelry for a hobbyist, or should I look to myself for improvement rather than my tools?

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Winterville, NC (eastern NC)
    Posts
    1,901
    If space is a consideration, the short stoke sliders do not take up any more space than a standard cabinet saw (ask Mr. Sheridan). With a slider you can forget about the home-made sleds, repeatable cross cutting to length is a breeze with a flip stop and they are, in my opinion, safer machines.
    As for dadoes; some of the sliders can accommodate them, but if not, a router is still a better bet for groovy situations.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    310
    This is a toughie, and one im securely perched on the fence about. I have both types of saws in my shop, and if i could only have one, i dont know that i would pick the felder over the unisaw. Its tough, because i use them for completely different operations, but I made a lot of stuff with a TS75, kapex, and unisaw prior to buying the KF700. I cant get over how awkward it is to rip things with the felder. With an 80" stroke, it isnt long enough to do 50-60% of what i consistently rip. And with a stroke over 49", you have to deal with the added footprint that makes it impossible to comfortably rip traditionally. I did it a few times when i got the saw to get a feel for if i could sell the unisaw, and it was enormously uncomfortable, inefficient, and mildly unsafe. I cut down the rails of my unisaw to 36" and it doesnt have an overly large footprint. For me, it is worth having it take up space to use as a rip and dado saw. My felder can accept a dado blade, but i dont feel like spending $1000 for the felder adjustable slot cutter. Even going the forrest route and having the bore and pins drilled isnt really worth it.

    Its a joy to work with a slider on numerous applications, but mine also has a few shortcomings that would really drive me nuts if i had to deal with them. I guess its the same as using a cabinet saw to crosscut an 8' board. That would suck. The same goes for trying to rip long and skinny stuff on my slider. I havent used a short stroke slider, but i imagine that would be an excellent one-stop-shop of a saw.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,050
    I've got sliders from 18" to 120" and 80" is my least favorite size. If space is a problem there is no downside to a 49" slider if the sliding table sub frame doesn't stick out in front of the saw. Much of my cabinet work needs less than a 39" stroke after the initial breakdown so my favorite short stroke saws are that size. If you intend to scrosscut a lot of ply, you need an outrigger and a saw heavy enough to handle the weight but a short stroke saw still beats a cabinet saw in my world. Dave

  12. #27
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Darmstadt, Germany
    Posts
    291
    I wanted a cabinet saw for my shop, but my choices were limited to contractor saws or sliders, as cabinet saws are not available here. I chose the Minimax SC2 Classic because it was available without the punishing lead time of a Hammer K3, was small enough that the disassembled pieces it would fit down the twists and turns of the stairs to my basement shop, the pieces could be moved with two people, and the final assembly and commissioning was included in the purchase price. I've used cabinet saws, so I'm very familiar with them, but now I won't part with my slider. I still rip full sheets in my garage because my shop is too small for a full sheet to pass by the blade, but I can crosscut full sheets with no problem.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Itapevi, SP - Brazil
    Posts
    294
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Wasner View Post
    If you can afford the cost and space for a slider, get a slider.

    I don't care for sliders, but if I could only have one saw, I would have a slider
    Fully agree.

    You do not need it. Period. I have a friend making fine furniture using a track saw!

    But if you can afford the cost and space for a slider, why not? I would love to have one!

    All the best.

  14. #29
    Is the Minimax sc2 comparable to the Hammer saws?

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh, Australia
    Posts
    2,180
    Yes it is but consider local service support when comparing them. Having said that they are fairly simple machines that rarely have problems.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

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