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Thread: Advice filling cracks and adding colour

  1. #1

    Advice filling cracks and adding colour

    Can members please advice on the various options and limitations in filling cracks

    eg. epoxy or CA glue and how to decide which and when to use

    Resigns types and use

    Coloured materials eg Brass powder and other metals , coffee grinds

    Artists materials Other coloured options


    Additionally Could cosmetic materials be incorporated into glue eg Nail varnish , foundation powders,mascara ,lipsticks,

    the colour range being almost infinite

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Elmodel, Ga.
    Posts
    209
    It depends on the size of the crack whether or not I use epoxy over ca. I like epoxy on larger cracks and voids and if the crack is small and doesn't pose much of a threat when turning, I'll go with ca. I've only used coffee grounds in mine, but I also want to experiment with some color. I have watched a lot of Youtube videos that gave some good advice on what and what not to do. I would suggest doing that. As far as using cosmetics, I don't know about those products, but I'm sure someone will give you some more info than I can. I know that you can use dyes and food coloring to tint the epoxy. One drop goes a long ways. It doesn't take much. Experiment if possible. Good luck.
    SWE

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kapolei Hawaii
    Posts
    2,774
    I've used: CA and wood dust, turquoise powder, coffee, etc. Wood glue and wood dust. Epoxy, you can thin it with Denatured Alcohol, and color it with oil based artist oil paint. Resin. Lots of choices with resin.
    CA for small cracks. Wood glue/dust can be used like putty. Epoxy for the bigger voids. Resin for huge voids. Good luck! As mentioned, experiment.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pueblo West, CO
    Posts
    483
    Realize that CA can and likely will leave a nasty stain. Sometimes you can give the wood a coat of sanding sealer to prevent the stain. Experiment with a scrap piece before you mess up a nice turning

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,638
    I use epoxy mixed with black dye powder.
    Don

  6. #6
    Epoxy mixed with just about anyting dry.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Jasper, Alabama
    Posts
    67
    Epoxy and mineral powders are an option. For large voids and inclusions use Resin mixed with your choice of colored powder dyes.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    TX, NM or on the road
    Posts
    778
    I started using crushed walnut hulls that was my brass polishing media. I also have been dyeing some of the crushed corn cob polishing media. Mixed with epoxy or if I can gluing in place with CA glue.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Asheboro,NC
    Posts
    122
    I've tried coffee grounds ( standard grind ) but I have found that expresso coffee works best for me. It is ground very fine and compresses very well in small voids or can be used in building up layers for larger cracks. It's also very cheap.

    Jay

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, TX
    Posts
    2,331
    Quote Originally Posted by Al Wasser View Post
    Realize that CA can and likely will leave a nasty stain. Sometimes you can give the wood a coat of sanding sealer to prevent the stain. Experiment with a scrap piece before you mess up a nice turning
    I have had pretty good luck spraying a light coat of lacquer in the area that the CA will be applied extending out far enough to catch any runs that might occur. The light coat remains on the surface but seals the pores while the crack is large enough for the CA to penetrate. Thin CA first for deep penetration followed by medium/thick for build also works well and the thin will help suck the thicker into the crack.

  11. #11
    A huge thank you to everyone for your posts

    I think the best way forward is to practice using different combinations of filler and glue on scrap pieces of wood .Then decide which ones to use for actual projects

    regards Brian

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