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Thread: Two bandsaw setup?

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    36"! wow, that's gotta be fun.

    To The OP
    Yes, I have two bandsaws. A 14" Jet and an 18" Rikon. Having two band saws is a nice option.
    I have a 10" and 14" as well, but see no point in anything smaller than a 30" saw.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    175
    I have had a Jet 18" for several years and this spring I got a Rikon 10-305 (10") after asking for advice here on SC. I keep a 1/2" 3 TPI blade on the Jet and use it for ripping, resawing and cutting banjo rim blocks with a miter gauge. I also use it to cut curves that are bigger than a 3 or 4" radius. I have a 1/4" blade in the 10" saw and use it to cut out pegheads, for the little curves at the heels of necks and so on, any tighter curves. It has been a big help. I have cut 2-3" thick wood with the little Rikon and it cuts nicely, though not extremely fast. In my work I need precision more than speed and since I'm not cutting huge volumes of wood I am not worried that my saws might be considered underpowered for a higher-production shop.
    Zach

  3. #18
    Just because one has a big saw, doesn't mean it's not precise.

  4. #19
    I have a 14" grizzly and used it to resaw for awhile..it was slow. I then decided to use the griz for curved work, and bought a rikon 325 ( pre-326). I use it to resaw. I use a 1/2 highland blade as it does everything I need. Is it fast as blazes? no. But it is fast enough to be quite useable and I don't make thousands of board feet of veneer every week. I am pleased with my choice. If you are not going commecrial, or starting a veneer business, I think your choice is reasonable and economical.
    Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the ground each morning, the devil says, "oh crap she's up!"


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  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Trussville, AL
    Posts
    190
    I have a 19 grizzly and LOATHE changing the blades. If I could spare the room at all I would absolutely buy a 14 saw for cutting curves and the like.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rochester, Minn
    Posts
    105
    I also have 2 bandsaws, a 14" Walker Turner and a 26" Moak. It is nice to keep a small blade on the 14. If you want a bigger saw don't neglect the used market. Bandsaws were once a staple of furniture factories and have been replaced by CNC, and you can often find a good one for quite reasonable dollars ($1100 for my Moak, and the prior owner delivered it!).

    Terry T

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Burlington, Washington
    Posts
    41
    I too have 2 bandsaws; a 14" Delta with the riser set up with a 1/4" blade and Carter guides for curves and a Grizzly 17" with a 3/4" carbide Laguna Resaw King. I don't miss having to stop and change blades.

    Dave

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Therneau View Post
    I also have 2 bandsaws, a 14" Walker Turner and a 26" Moak. It is nice to keep a small blade on the 14. If you want a bigger saw don't neglect the used market. Bandsaws were once a staple of furniture factories and have been replaced by CNC, and you can often find a good one for quite reasonable dollars ($1100 for my Moak, and the prior owner delivered it!).

    Terry T
    They only made about 300 of those 26" Moaks. Nice saws.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Cache Valley, Utah
    Posts
    1,485
    I have a MM 20" and a 14", an older, smaller version of the Grizzly G0817 14" steel frame bandsaw. The 20" has a 1" WM CT on it all the time and is used for ripping and resaw, and generally I have a 3/16 or 1/4" on the Grizzly for scroll and utility work.

    (I have two table saws, too. The PM 65 generally has a fine crosscut blade and the Delta 12/14 usually has a rip blade. And don't forget the RAS...)
    Last edited by Dave Cav; 08-11-2018 at 12:20 AM.

  10. #25
    Thanks a bunch, Michelle. I think given my needs, keeping the 14" Delta will be the way to go. Some new guides and the right blade, and I'll be curvin' it up.

    Now to make room on the shop floor...

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Pottstown PA
    Posts
    968
    Yep had two for a long time. I had a 17" griz 2hp hd saw that was a one fits all. Major PIA to change over form big blade to small blade and adjust. I did that for a long time till a 1934, delta 14" came on the market for 200 bucks. I have that set up with small blade and carter blade stabilizer. Great for cutting small circles and handles most of my work now. I have the Griz set up and dialed in with a carbide 1" blade for resaw. Best of both worlds. Definitely go for it! (I've got a 16" walker turner in parts as a project saw, but may even sell that one. don't know if I can justify 3. Cheers.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    106
    I have a two BS setup as well--a cheap Craftsman 14" with a 3/8 (?) blade for general and curves, and a Rikon 10-326 14" for resawing. They take up quite the footprints but I got the layouts to work okay enough to justify not having to swap blades all the time.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Southwestern CT
    Posts
    1,392
    I have had this setup for some time. Works for me. Sometimes I have to wiggle the little Delta a bit further out into the shop and then wiggle it back when done.
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    "the mechanic that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools. Confucius

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
    Posts
    304
    Two bandsaws here. I use a 17" grizzly for resaw and general straight cuts in thicker stock. I have a 14" fitted with a Carter stablizer bearing on a 1/4" bimetal blade (fine toothed, 14 tpi, I think) for curved cuts, and cuts in thinner, and soft material. Love the Carter stablizer and the bimetal holds up well. Cuts plywood pretty cleanly. I seldom run thick material thru the 14" bandsaw, but have made a few bandsaw boxes. For that, I change to a coarser blade, like 8 tpi.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    LA & SC neither one is Cali
    Posts
    9,447
    I don't have (only) two bandsaw, only because 2 is merely a start...

    Often people go with a smaller bandsaw for contour cutting but larger saws also have benefits for cutting contours as well.

    As far as machines go bandsaws are one of the few you see multiples of in a hobby shop, primarily because changing tooling is so involved.
    Of all the laws Brandolini's may be the most universally true.

    Deep thought for the day:

    Your bandsaw weighs more when you leave the spring compressed instead of relieving the tension.

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