Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 26 of 26

Thread: Fire safety

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    5,929
    I have a used Flammable materials cabinet that is not in the shop. I only have flammable materials in the shop when I am using them. Nothing flammable is in my shop.
    Soaked rags are the bigger concern. They always hang outside on a metal frame until they're dry. Then I soak them in water and put them in a sealed zip lock bag for disposal.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    46,558
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Yikes, I can't imagine designing a building with a "far end without an exit". Unless the far end is underground perhaps an emergency exit window could be added.
    My 62' long shop has man-doors at both ends, several rollup doors, and in the middle has two double steel doors to the exterior.
    My shop is relatively small, but I still have multiple exits available...the main "man door", a "man door" into the adjacent one remaining garage bay, the double "material/nice day" doors in the shop and a door to the outside from the upstairs. These are all normally secured for obvious reasons, but easily opened from the inside should a quick departure be necessary. I believe that every shop space should, where possible, have at least two egress points, even if one is a large window that can be opened or destroyed to get out in an emergency. "Stuff happens"...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    340
    We have all heard that rags can spontaneously combust but I am interested in actual first hand accounts. Exactly what conditions were and can I duplicate that (outdoors of course). Know your enemy...

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    915
    For those of you who keep large containers outside, are high summer temperatures a problem? I would think the heat makes them more dangerous, even if not in direct sun, but also causes deterioration.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    8,893
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    We have all heard that rags can spontaneously combust but I am interested in actual first hand accounts. Exactly what conditions were and can I duplicate that (outdoors of course). Know your enemy...
    They didn't catch fire, however they were smoking, that's close enough for me.

    It was Tung oil, I normally simply lay them flat on the concrete floor to dry, no problem with that, in this case my friend cleaned up the rags and stuffed them in the garbage bin......Rod.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Northern UT
    Posts
    654
    On a related note, how many have fire alarms, where are they located, and most importantly, when were they installed? I ask because I learned that fire alarms become almost worthless after about 10 years. My house still has the original ones installed when built 22 years ago. I am working to replace them all now. I need to consider fire alarms for my shop, something loud so even if not there the neighbors will hear it.
    I am in love with Montana. For other states I have admiration, respect, recognition, even some affection, but with Montana it is love.... It seems to me that Montana is a great splash of grandeur....the mountains are the kind I would create if mountains were ever put on my agenda. Montana seems to me to be what a small boy would think Texas is like from hearing Texans. Montana has a spell on me. It is grandeur and warmth. Of all the states it is my favorite and my love.

    John Steinbeck


  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    46,558
    Fire alarms in a shop have to be handled differently than in a home because of the nature of what we do. Particulates in the air from our machines (IE, really fine dust that's missed by the DC) can set off "regular" fire/smoke alarms. So detection in a shop (and garage) is more often a heat rise sensor. These are generally available for use with most alarm systems, but I'm not sure about "stand-alone"...that would have to be researched. I currently do not have any fire/heat detection in my shop building; just security.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Fire safety: turn off air compressor when leaving the shop. A friend's shop burned when a problem caused the big compressor to run continuously while he was away.

    JKJ
    To make Johns tip a bit easier, I put my compressor on a motion controlled contactor-this way I cannot forget to turn it off when I leave

  9. #24
    A friend hired some paint contractors to stain his wood sided house. They threw their drop cloths in a pile in his garage, and they burned the house pretty much, not to the ground, but severely damaged it. So I throw my stain and finish rags outside till they are dry, then put them in the trash.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    5,929
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    We have all heard that rags can spontaneously combust but I am interested in actual first hand accounts. Exactly what conditions were and can I duplicate that (outdoors of course). Know your enemy...
    Get a pile of soaked rags, put them in a plastic kitchen trash bin and wait.


    Jim
    Heat detectors would work, but if a person were rally serious they would have Infared detectors in the shop.
    Regular smoke detectors work on two principles. Ionization and photoelectric. The dust in the air to a photo and ion cell would appear as smoke.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  11. #26
    Neat idea. What product(s) did you use for your motion controlled contactor?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •