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Thread: First Boat, need help

  1. #31
    Using cloth insures that you maintain a certain minimum thickness of epoxy barrier and provides extra protection. What does the designer call for?
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  2. #32
    The Lumberyard Skiff plans dont specify finishing but Walter sends his to a fiberglass shop to be coated.

  3. I don't know Walter but, if you respect his judgement, you might want to emulate him. Surely glassing the inside will make it very durable.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  4. #34
    Walter Baron is the Lumberyard Skiff designer. He runs a shop called Old Wharf Dory

  5. #35
    All the more reason to emulate him.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  6. #36
    Epoxy and cloth it is then, inside and out. Stand by for many more questions as my build progresses

  7. #37
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    Zach:

    I'd be interested in pros and cons for that type of boat for Dynel/Fiberglass. For the same weight cloth, Dynel (Xynole) would hold more epoxy providing perhaps better barrier. It is also more flexible than glass cloth which is essentially not flexible at all. I would think for the Lumberyard Skiff you are looking for barrier protection and abrasion resistance far more than additional strength. Some years ago a fellow that worked for Union Carbide told me about a life-cycle test they performed with battens and various combinations of glass and plastics. The Epoxy/Dynel proved most durable.
    "the mechanic that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools.Ē Confucius

  8. #38
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    I just want to note that painting a Lumberyard Skiff is just as good as fiberglassing it. Thatís what I did. I used two coats of primer on the outside and two coats of finish. All Interlux. I rolled on an arms length of paint on a 6Ē roller and a friend followed behind with a foam brush. Two years later I put another coat on. Fiberglassing is expensive and I think unnecessary for this boat. I spar varnished the rails and I painted the inside too. However, you canít go wrong wither way. Good luck. (Post a picture.)

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by John LoDico View Post
    ...painting a Lumberyard Skiff is just as good as fiberglassing it...
    Come on!
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by John LoDico View Post
    I just want to note that painting a Lumberyard Skiff is just as good as fiberglassing it. That’s what I did. I used two coats of primer on the outside and two coats of finish. All Interlux. I rolled on an arms length of paint on a 6” roller and a friend followed behind with a foam brush. Two years later I put another coat on. Fiberglassing is expensive and I think unnecessary for this boat. I spar varnished the rails and I painted the inside too. However, you can’t go wrong wither way. Good luck. (Post a picture.)
    Maybe painting with AwlGrip is similar to coating with epoxy only, but not at all comparable to epoxy and cloth. I recommend a 6 ounce cloth wet out with epoxy of your choice- I use West System and Raka. Raka is just as good as West and cheaper. West I can get locally. There are other good ones- Silvertip gets great reviews and I'm told flows really well. Epoxy cloth adds an element of strength over just epoxy coating, and also creates a more permanent barrier. Epoxy only can eventually start to crack over time and allow water infiltration.

  11. #41
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    Remember, itís a ďlumberyardĒ skiff. Down and dirty. The ones Iíve seen around here ó that have been on the water for years ó are painted. To each his own though.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by John LoDico View Post
    Remember, it’s a “lumberyard” skiff. Down and dirty. The ones I’ve seen around here — that have been on the water for years — are painted. To each his own though.
    My apologies because you are right in this. I was just addressing the "just as good as painting" part. Resin and cloth are inherently stronger than just painting, but to your point- Many boats have survived many years with just paint. I read of a boat made from marine grade ply that wasn't even painted- just left bare wood- and it lasted many years.

    I do caution folks against epoxy coating only, because epoxy breaks down in UV and cracks and peels. I recommend epoxy coated parts to be coated with either paint or UV inhibiting varnish, and varnish sanded and reapplied no different than if on bare wood. I'm only stating this because it was brought up about epoxy coating and I wanted to throw in that bit of caution.

  13. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm Schweizer View Post
    My apologies because you are right in this. I was just addressing the "just as good as painting" part. Resin and cloth are inherently stronger than just painting, but to your point- Many boats have survived many years with just paint. I read of a boat made from marine grade ply that wasn't even painted- just left bare wood- and it lasted many years.

    I do caution folks against epoxy coating only, because epoxy breaks down in UV and cracks and peels. I recommend epoxy coated parts to be coated with either paint or UV inhibiting varnish, and varnish sanded and reapplied no different than if on bare wood. I'm only stating this because it was brought up about epoxy coating and I wanted to throw in that bit of caution.
    +1

    Paint only is fine unless you need to beach the boat often or etc.; paint does not have the abrasion resistance of an epoxy-glass coating. And then you need to apply paint over the epoxy-glass for uv protection, so it's more expense and more work but you do get the abrasion protection, better impact strength and a more durable water barrier. If your use of the boat doesn't need those, skip the epoxy-glass. As they say around here, YMMV.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  14. #44
    The other thing is... Paint only is probably fine if you are religious to take it out of the water, trailer it, remove the motor and store the boat flipped upside down under cover 100% EVERY SINGLE TIME.... That’s the way they did the old wooden strip boats.... and keeping them upside down makes sure the water isn’t pooled inside the hull to rot the boat...

    If you store it right side up under cover - you will have to figure out a way to get all the water out and then run fans to keep the hull dry..

    It’s not an aluminum jon boat - you can’t treat it like one.

    With the resin... The thin non-woven mat is there to ensure you have sufficient resin thickness for waterproofing - it doesn’t really add strength. If you look at the thickness - 1.5 oz non-woven mat is about the same thickness as 6oz woven... but the 6oz mat has 4x as much glass in it for strength. If you use 0.5oz or 0.75oz mat - all it’s going to do is provide a substrate for your resin so it won’t crack and peel off... it doesn’t really add any appreciable strength... Waterproofing what you need on a wooden boat because the wood is the structure..

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