Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Buffing questions and Polishing Compounds?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northeast Georgia
    Posts
    811

    Buffing questions and Polishing Compounds?

    Okay, it's time to get a buffing system together. I'm going to by the 8" beall buffs and mount them on a shop made extension (similar to the hold fast extension) for my chuck with support from my nova live center to be used one at a time. I'm not sure I need three wheels, I'm not sure I want the wax at all, so I don't think the 'system' package is what I need. I'm not waxing pieces that will be handled or in contact with food.

    I know the standard is tripoli followed by white diamond. I know folks will use these on bare wood or finishes or both. But then I read about white diamond leaving white marks/residue on dark wood, I do a lot of walnut bowls. I've also read that some of the liquid plastic polishes are maybe better for film finishes like polyurethane/varnish. I know when I'm making pens with a CA finish I've had very good luck with Behlen's Furniture polish which is basically like liquid car wax, buffing with a blue paper towel wet then dry.

    I'll probably try this polish first and see if it gets me what I want.

    For the folks using the tripoli/white diamond do you then wash the bowl if it's going to be used for food?

    Anyone buffing oil finishes like danish oil or polymerized tung oil? Do the compounds contaminate the finish? I'm guessing without a film finish you risk getting the compound in the pores.

    I don't have any woodcraft/woodworking supplier nearby but I'm headed to Atlanta next week, I'll probably swing by Highlands while I'm there and pick up my buffing stuff. Trying to come up with a shopping list. I hate buying a $18 wheel and paying $12 for shipping.
    Where did I put that?

  2. #2
    I bought my beall buffing system off amazon for around the same price as other places online. My prime got it to my door next day with free shipping. The white diamond depends on how porous the wood is. The white residue isn't being left on the surface it gets stuck in the pours in the surface and can be seen if you know they are there. I had a couple pieces that got the white on it but when i showed the pieces to people that didn't know they were there they didn't notice them. As for the caranuba wax beall says its pharmaceutical grade wax used in pill making. I would think if its used to coat something we swallow it has to be food grade. I bought the kit for $78 that came with motor shaft attachment. I picked up a half horsepower 1800 rpm motor from harbor freight for under $100 with one of there 25% coupons and made a buffing station.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kapolei Hawaii
    Posts
    2,763
    Get the Beall system and be done. I found out the hard way there's a lot of different wheels and compounds out there. I'd guess there's at least 5 different tripoli compounds. Got some for metal, plastic, jewelry, face blush, and wood. The metal tripoli is very aggressive and will completely remove finish and deposit that red stuff. Beall has done the research and includes the correct compounds. I wasted lots of time and money buying the wrong stuff. Found out there's a ton of "cotton" wheels...... Most not suited to buffing bowls. Just my $0.02.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    TX, NM or on the road
    Posts
    757
    I had been using Caswell Plating buffing wheels and compounds for a long time, it was good enough for our jewelry making, so whne I just added buffing to my lathe work, I went with what they offered. A greater selection and a staff that deals only with plating and buffing issues. My wheels are mounted on homemade shafts that screw on the spindle of my lathes.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    lufkin tx
    Posts
    1,937
    Decades ago I went to liquid compounds and carnuba waxes made for cars. The wax sticks were tradionly used for metal work and are really too hard and hot for good buffing on wood finishes. Do what the experts do on lacquers and other car finishes and try the liquids--they do not get hot or smear at ll. The white spots you mention are caused by open pores filling with compounds--a good film finish has open pores.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northeast Georgia
    Posts
    811
    That’s my holdup on the solid compounds, it seems they are all really meant for metal. The plastic compounds seem to be a better fit. They certainly are for CA glue.

    I’m definitely getting the Beall buffs- but if I only need 1 or 2 buffs, and won’t be using their compounds it makes sense just to buy the replacement buffs and not the entire kit.
    Where did I put that?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    lufkin tx
    Posts
    1,937
    If you can find one I recommend a #2 taper in the headstock hole with a threaded 5/8" shaft on the end. Then why the kit at all. Tap it in with a rubber hammer and the shaft is not in the way and why not two buff wheels on the shaft?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Strongsville OH
    Posts
    51
    I use all 3 Beall wheels and compounds, on both film finishes and penetrating oils. I am almost always pleased with the results with buffing oil finishes -- WOP, danish and walnut oil. Walnut oil by itself is a matte finish and buffing really makes it shine, and it feels great also. I have not had many instances of the white diamond leaving a residue, even on walnut. I do not believe the compounds are "contaminating the finish"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •