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Thread: Created a slope on chisel back

  1. #1

    Created a slope on chisel back

    Hello - Iím pretty new to all this and I have a real old set of buck bros chisels. I became obsessed with flattening the backs. It took forever to do about 2 inches from the tips. Again I didnít really know what I was doing besides using sandpaper on a granite block. Needless to say I was pretty aggressive and I created a very gentle slope or ridge on the chisel back. If I run my finger tips along the back I can feel where I stopped abrading the chisel back (like a little bump or step up) at the 2Ē mark.

    Did I ruin these chisels?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Longview WA
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    (edited) I have a real old set of buck bros chisels.

    Did I ruin these chisels?
    How old is the set? Are they pre-Buck head?

    How many chisels did you do this to before noticing?

    You can likely save them with a bit more work on the backs.

    My most used chisels are a set fromBuck Bros.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Bakerton WV
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    I would argue that 2 inches of flatness is fine as a general condition however specifics do matter but flat needs to transition to the rest of the blade with tangency.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    SE Michigan
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    The chisels arenít ruined and will be very usable. If you plan to clean out a long dado or do other paring, you will just need to be sure to register the chisel against the 2Ē flat.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    The Netherlands
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    I would blend in the step a bit so you can't feel it anymore. No reason to think these chisels are ruined.

  6. #6
    I agree that for most operations you will be fine. Having a definite step that can snag would bother me but, smoothing it in could cause you to think you had a good registration surface when after 2" you do not. I have butt chisels where the round shaft is proud of the chisel sole (face?). This puts these chisels in the same position you are now in even when brand new. Your call but, I would just use them and remain aware.
    She said ďHow many woodworking tools do you need?Ē
    I said ďWhy? Do you know someone who is selling some?Ē


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Stone Mountain, GA
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    In the future when doing heavy flattening work you need to keep the chisel moving along its length a bit, as well as side to side, to avoid creating a ridge wherever the abrasive stops.

    But for these I agree that 2" of flat back is enough for use. What I would be concerned about is if the overall shape of the chisel back is hollow along its length. Some paring operations will be difficult if it is, although most tasks will be unaffected.

  8. #8
    Most of them say cast steel and have a very rudimentary buck head pressed into the front of the chisel. A few just say cast steel.

  9. #9
    Thanks all. I think Iím just going to leave them alone for the time being rather than try to blend them.

    I actually really like these chisels. The steel seems very nice and they feel pretty good. But I also donít have anything to compare them to except my brand new set of Stanly 750 sweetheart chisels. Which seem to be ok. The landing on the 3/4Ē chisel is a full 1/8Ē which seems a little fat to me. But again I donít know what the heck Iím talking about. I just read a bunch of stuff lol.

  10. #10
    Seth, I have a set of those 750's, decent chisels. I wouldn't worry too much about the 3/4 - its the smaller chisels like the 1/2'' that you'll be poking at dovetails with.

    As far as the BB chisels, I'd 'flatten' out the ridge you've created and call it a day. Best of luck.
    "The reward of a thing well done is having done it." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
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    17,631
    Quote Originally Posted by Seth Terndrup View Post
    Most of them say cast steel and have a very rudimentary buck head pressed into the front of the chisel. A few just say cast steel.
    The buck head started in about 1870 if my memory is working.

    Some of mine have a rectangular logo and some have what looks like a bow tie.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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