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Thread: Punky wood

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Newburgh, Indiana
    Posts
    689

    Punky wood

    I have a piece of cherry that I turned for the center spindle of a shaker candle stand. The end that has the sliding dove tails to attach the legs, has some punky spots. Before I glue it up, I am wondering if a little CA glue soaked into the end grain might stabilize the wood?
    Life's too short to use old sandpaper.

  2. #2
    I've used the MinWax wood hardener to beef up punky wood with good results. It seems to penetrate really well.
    minwax-high-performance-wood-hardener.jpg
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Contribute

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Newburgh, Indiana
    Posts
    689
    Thanks, Lee, I'll give it a try.
    Life's too short to use old sandpaper.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    North Virginia
    Posts
    242
    You might also have good luck with Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer (CPES). I use the kind from Jamestown Distributors, although there are several other vendors out there. Good stuff. Soaks right in and hardens/seals the wood.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Milton, GA
    Posts
    3,201
    For some time now there has been discussion over whether or not WATCO can “strengthen” wood. I think the discussion often belies the actual value of a product like this. I work with green wood fairly often. There are also wider and weaker rings/layers of wood in many boards. Sometimes the “weaker” wood is a problem specifically because it may absorb more moisture, as is present in most green wood. Older wood is often dry and more likely to absorb moisture, which may cause “rot”. Moisture usually needs some sort of regulation or cracks/exspansion/contraction may occur.

    Sometimes there may be a need to allow moisture out while preventing more moisture from being absorbed, often the case with green wood. I have found WATCO to have the most value in these situations. Products which form very hard surfaces may also prevent moisture from escaping, which may have disadvantages as well as advantages.

    I am not sure what the OP is planing for the wood he mentions. It may be important to calculate any need for moisture, of any type, to escape as well as prevent it from entering. I look at WATCO as more of a temporary control over moisture in either direction. The rate of moisture escape may be controled by adjusting the amount of solids vs liquid in the various layers applied.
    Last edited by Mike Holbrook; Today at 8:27 AM.

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