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Thread: Dustopper ?!?

  1. #1

    Dustopper ?!?

    Has anyone used this yet?
    looks like a thien seperator molded out of plastic
    I like my dust deputy but it is tall and cumbersome

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Dustoppe...HD12/302643445
    Carpe Lignum

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
    Posts
    753
    Basically a vacuum cleaner version of these.

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/pag...82&cat=1,42401

    There is no Thien type baffle incorporated into it.

  3. #3
    I picked up a Dustopper yesterday. Plugged my 6HP shop vac into it and it seemed to do great. Everything in the bucket and none in the vac.
    5 gallon bucket fills too fast though so I got a 20 gal. brute garbage can, cut the lid to fit the bucket in. Silicone around the bucket and weather stripping around the can lid. Used ABS for pipe from vac to Dustopper. Runs great but I need to reinforce the garbage can as it's collapsing in on itself when the vac is running. Thinking I'll make some round ribs to go in the can.

    I'd been thinking of making my own but this just seemed easier and I'll still be able to modify to my needs. A cart is definitely a need.

  4. #4

    Dustopper update

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Christensen View Post
    Basically a vacuum cleaner version of these.

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/pag...82&cat=1,42401

    There is no Thien type baffle incorporated into it.
    Hi Peter. Your assumption is not accurate. I am the inventor of Dustopper, and can tell you there is a lot going on with this design. The rounded upper chamber; the inverted frustrum, a vortex locator with a separator wall, and more, all make this a very efficient separator. There are a number of flow dynamics issues with the baffle on Thein's design that are corrected on Dustopper. The slot around the perimeter is recessed at the beginning and at its end so that low pressure causes particulate to drop very quickly (at the beginning of the arc) or to continue flowing with out disruption (at the end of the arc.) Unfortunately, since you live in Canada, you have to make assumptions without trying a Dustopper, unless you have visited the US and brought one home with you.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,653
    I keep wondering when we are going to start seeing Shop-Vacs with mini cyclones built in. Seeing this concept now as mainstream as Home Depot offerings Im guessing we arent far out now.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
    Posts
    753
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Huntley View Post
    Hi Peter. Your assumption is not accurate. I am the inventor of Dustopper, and can tell you there is a lot going on with this design. The rounded upper chamber; the inverted frustrum, a vortex locator with a separator wall, and more, all make this a very efficient separator. There are a number of flow dynamics issues with the baffle on Thein's design that are corrected on Dustopper. The slot around the perimeter is recessed at the beginning and at its end so that low pressure causes particulate to drop very quickly (at the beginning of the arc) or to continue flowing with out disruption (at the end of the arc.) Unfortunately, since you live in Canada, you have to make assumptions without trying a Dustopper, unless you have visited the US and brought one home with you.
    Tom I could have sworn you replied to my comment just after I posted it back in September and it differed somewhat from what I see now. There was no offence intended. Any pictures of it on the US HD website don't show the underside so I made assumptions that now seeing your post are wrong. They aren't sold here yet and as I live over 4 hours north of the 49th it isn't practical to take a trip across to have a look. I'd like to see the underside if you would post a picture to satisfy my curiosity, but if you prefer not to I understand.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    151
    I would like one that is designed to fit a 30-35 gallon metal trash can and a 1-1.5hp dust collector.

  8. #8
    My old Ridgid Shop Vac finally gave up the ghost about 2 weeks ago. After I decided to get another one (instead of a fein/festool type vac) I then decided to add a dust deputy or similar to help eliminate the filter clogging/ cleaning which was the worst part of having the old vac. At the last moment I saw that HD now sells the Duststopper. I saw several youtube reviews which compared the duststopper to the dust deputy. Most were very favorable with the Duststopper performing very similarly to the Dust Deputy. What clinched it for me was the low profile of the duststopper. I never really liked how high the dust deputy sits above the bucket. So far I have used it enough to know I am happy with my purchase. It was nice to buy the whole shebang at my local HD. Vac Bucket, separator and not have to mail order. I also got some cheap harbor freight polyurethane castors and put em under my orange bucket. I used 2 old bungee cords to wrap the bucket to my vac. And they wheel around together as one solid unit but only take a second to separate to clean out the bucket. So far my vac and filter have stayed clean and everything but the finest dust goes into the bucket. Along with the Cleanstream Hepa Filter I am really happy with my new setup!

    The ease of maintenance with the separator and the rinseable hepa filter are head and shoulders above my old setup. Dustopsper gets a thumb up from me so far.

    IMG_2341.jpgIMG_2342.jpg

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Huntley View Post
    Hi Peter. Your assumption is not accurate. I am the inventor of Dustopper, and can tell you there is a lot going on with this design. The rounded upper chamber; the inverted frustrum, a vortex locator with a separator wall, and more, all make this a very efficient separator. There are a number of flow dynamics issues with the baffle on Thein's design that are corrected on Dustopper. The slot around the perimeter is recessed at the beginning and at its end so that low pressure causes particulate to drop very quickly (at the beginning of the arc) or to continue flowing with out disruption (at the end of the arc.) Unfortunately, since you live in Canada, you have to make assumptions without trying a Dustopper, unless you have visited the US and brought one home with you.
    Questions to the inventor, is this system more efficient or less efficient than a cyclone? I’m sure you’ve done tests if you’re saying this is no thien. Can you post efficiency ratings compared to dust deputy and the LV Thein separators and any others you’ve tested against? Can you give the test results from the non-partial testing firm? I am sure anybody viewing this post would be interested!

    To credit yourself above and beyond LV thien or DD, I am sure you have independent testing laboratory results with a US firm ? Can you provide them to this thread and the firm that did the testing ??
    Last edited by Matt Mattingley; 09-26-2018 at 12:29 AM.

  10. #10

    Dustopper and independent testing labs

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Mattingley View Post
    Questions to the inventor, is this system more efficient or less efficient than a cyclone? Iím sure youíve done tests if youíre saying this is no thien. Can you post efficiency ratings compared to dust deputy and the LV Thein separators and any others youíve tested against? Can you give the test results from the non-partial testing firm? I am sure anybody viewing this post would be interested!

    To credit yourself above and beyond LV thien or DD, I am sure you have independent testing laboratory results with a US firm ? Can you provide them to this thread and the firm that did the testing ??
    The market for small cyclonic or centrifugal separators is not large enough to justify independent testing labs. There are companies that perform tests on large separators used for filtration of air in factories, mines, grain milling operations, etc. They generally use classified dust (dust that has been separated in a way that all of the particles are close to the same size) to calculate the "cut point" of a given separator. The cut point is the size of a particulate that has a 50/50 chance of passing through the separator or being separated from the air flow. This term is often used to define the effectiveness of pleated filters as well. So, if a cyclone or filter has a cut point of 3 microns, and the ONLY size particle that passes through either is 3 microns, 50% of the dust will end up in the bucket, and 50% will go straight through.

    Here's the catch: When cyclones (and filters) are designed to separate smaller particles, their restriction to air flow increases. HEPA filters, for example, slow the movement of air more than a "standard use" filter. Cyclones that are designed to be outstanding at collecting fines may have difficulty moving enough air to handle heavy loads of sawdust like one might expect from a planer. The reason there are no HEPA cyclones out there is because to design one that separates down to 0.3 microns would necessarily mean the height to diameter ration of the cyclone would make it too tall to fit into a shop. Dustopper is calibrated to separate better than 99% of most shop dust. In fact, many times its separation performance comes amazingly close to 100%.

    The cut point of the Dustopper and Dust Deputy are very close to the same. It will thrill the gang at Oneida to know the cut point of the Dust Deputy may be a tiny bit better. I have made literally hundreds of tests with both. If I use drywall mix out of the bag for my testing media and pick up a gallon of dust with both separators, the amount of powder seen in the collection bucket under the Dustopper will be slightly more white than the lay of dust found in the bucket of the Dust Deputy. We're talking about a teaspoon or so difference after picking up 231 cubic inches, or one gallon!

    I am a woodworker like most who are reading this forum. I started making DIY separators and was frustrated with the results so I purchased a Dust Deputy. I liked the improved performance over my DIY attempts, but found the Dust Deputy awkward to move from site to site. (I designed and built custom projects like library walls, fireplace surrounds, entertainment centers, and the like for high-end homes and offices.) Since woodworking was my career, I suppose one could say dust separation became my hobby. I read everything I could find on separation of particulate from air, and included in the mix was a heavy dose of self education on flow dynamics. Out of that came Dustopper - a hybrid of sorts that causes air to move in a circle like a cyclone, but inside a chamber having an inverted frustum (dished top) that behaves like a wing. A detailed explanation of design theory would take pages. Bottom line is this: They basically work the same, with Dust Deputy having a very tiny advantage with fines but costing more and requiring time and additional expense before it's operational. When used with ordinary "shop dust" there is no perceivable difference in performance between the two devices. Dustopper can be put into operation in seconds with no additional investment, assuming you already own a bucket.

    Neither design is "HEPA" certifiable, so both will need a HEPA filter included with their respective setups to ensure that the air exhausted from the host vacuum is breathable. Depending on how much you use your separator, you may find that you spend another 15-30 minutes every year cleaning the HEPA filter connected to your Dustopper. It boils down to a More Taste : Less Filling argument. Purchasers of Dustopper generally appreciate it's low profile, and find its separating capability more than adequate for their needs.

    A larger version is planned - soon!

  11. #11
    The above seems to jive up the same as the YouTube vids I saw comparing DD vs DS. DD has a very tiny edge in performance. But in actual use I think itís a moot point. As I said in another post, for me, the miniscule difference in performance became irrelevant because of the benefit of this DSís low profile. Iím not affiliated with the DS or nothin just putting my opinion out there since I researched, bought, and have used mine.

    I have an Oneida 3 HP Super Dust Gorilla. Itís a great machine. Based on its build quality and performance I have no doubt that the Dust Deputy is also a great product. But I am glad to see another product that is locally available, reasonably priced, and whose performance compares equally to others in the market. I also like that it matches my shop vac
    As always YMMV.

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