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Thread: Paint cabinet doors

  1. #1

    Paint cabinet doors

    I am remodeling the kitchen for a veteran.
    I have a lot of cabinet doors from a face lift project
    Now the veteran and I have agreed on using these doors, but they need to be painted blue.
    I have a brand new earlex sprayport 6003
    I would like to know what I can spray on the these cabinets to achieve this

    thanks
    Carpe Lignum

  2. #2
    Not totally clear on the question. Blue paint of some sort, of course. Where the discussion starts is when you give some requirements for the surface. Being in a kitchen I automatically lean toward the finishes being offered specific to kitchen and high wear / high moisture areas. These can get quite costly so a budget would also help. With enough info from you, this is an area where the pros on here can really help out. They know which finishes don't result in call-backs.
    She said How many woodworking tools do you need?
    I said Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?


  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Not totally clear on the question. Blue paint of some sort, of course. Where the discussion starts is when you give some requirements for the surface. Being in a kitchen I automatically lean toward the finishes being offered specific to kitchen and high wear / high moisture areas. These can get quite costly so a budget would also help. With enough info from you, this is an area where the pros on here can really help out. They know which finishes don't result in call-backs.
    Thanks for the reply Glen. Lets see if I can help clarify those points
    Cabinets doors and frames is the project , so yes high wear and high moisture
    Satin finish
    Vinyl sealer then clear coat?
    Automotive paint then clear coat?
    defintitly something I can sptay out of my earlex 6003
    lets say the budget is $500 plus or minus
    30 linear feat of cabinet wall space
    Carpe Lignum

  4. #4
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    You'll want to use a paint that has the durability appropriate for a kitchen. One good option is Benjamin Moore Advance, which is an emulsified alkyd finish in a water carrier. It gives you the benefits of an oil based finish with easier clean up and spray-ability, provided your gun is setup well for it. It can also be brushed on. And...it's accessible since it's sold in any BM store. Do note that because of the nature of this paint, it needs a little time to fully cure...more that most water borne paints...so be patient and let that happen. The other paint I've successfully used in a kitchen situation is Sherwin Williams ProClassic which is a 100% acrylic that brushes on and levels beautifully. I don't spray it, however.

    It's extremely important that you fully clean all of the areas and items that you'll be painting. TSP is a common cleaner for that and it should be used in conjunction with normal abrasion to the cabinets and doors so that the paint will fully adhere. You'll want to use a good quality primer, too...the paint store can recommend what's best to use under the Advance (or whatever product you choose).
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
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    I would start by a good cleaning, then repair any defects and sand them with 150 or 180 grit. BM Advance is great stuff, I've used a few times and it sprays and brushes very well, but it takes forever to dry and even longer to cure. It takes at least 15 hours to dry enough to scuff sand for the next coat, at least in my 70F, 50% RH shop, and weeks to cure very hard. I recommend you look at Lenmar's MagnaVar, which is available at BM and can be tinted to any of their colors. It's a WB that will dry in an hour or two so you won't be waiting forever to complete the job, and is KCMA rated. Another option is TC's EM-6500 WB lacquer, also available in any BM color. Prime with the primer recommended.

    John

  6. #6
    Thanks Jim!
    I am planning on using tsp, it is my old standby for cleaning surfaces prior to refinninshing
    I do get a signifigant discount at sherwin williams.
    And No I am not brushing raised panel doors. I am meticulous trim carpenter but brushing is not my forte
    ;o)
    Carpe Lignum

  7. #7
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    John mentions the TC EM-6500...I actually just used that for my new kitchen uppers and it did spray nicely, albeit differently than their clears which I'm "standard" on. I used a BM tint color code, but as John mentioned, both BM and SW colors are supported. I chose to top coat with EM-8000cv, both for the additional protection benefit and because I had some. My lowers are white and were recently re-painted with the SW ProClassic acrylic. Brushed. And there are zero brush marks.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    I would start by a good cleaning, then repair any defects and sand them with 150 or 180 grit. BM Advance is great stuff, I've used a few times and it sprays and brushes very well, but it takes forever to dry and even longer to cure. It takes at least 15 hours to dry enough to scuff sand for the next coat, at least in my 70F, 50% RH shop, and weeks to cure very hard. I recommend you look at Lenmar's MagnaVar, which is available at BM and can be tinted to any of their colors. It's a WB that will dry in an hour or two so you won't be waiting forever to complete the job, and is KCMA rated. Another option is TC's EM-6500 WB lacquer, also available in any BM color. Prime with the primer recommended.

    John
    I think you are mixing up the MegaVar solvent conversion varnish (tintable, KCMA rated) and the MegaVar wb clear poly ( not KCMA)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jared Sankovich View Post
    I think you are mixing up the MegaVar solvent conversion varnish (tintable, KCMA rated) and the MegaVar wb clear poly ( not KCMA)
    I don't know about the solvent based one, but WB MegaVar is KCMA rated.

    Manufactured by Benjamin Moore & Co., 101 Paragon Drive, Montvale, NJ 07645 Tel: 866-708-9180 Fax: 888-248-2143 www.lenmar-coatings.com M72 1WB.50X US 060618
    MEGAVAR-WB
    PREMIUM WATERBORNE CLEAR POLYURETHANE FINISH
    1WB.50X
    Features General Description
     Non-Yellowing Formulation
    Exceeds KCMA Standards
     High Solids Content
     Ready To Spray Viscosity
     Self-Sealing
     Resists Moisture
     Resists chemicals
     No Pot Life
    Lenmar 1WB.50X MegaVar-WB Series of non-yellowing, high solids, waterborne finishes is designed for the professional woodworker who demands maximum performance and clarity in a clear finish. This product is a self-sealing, self-catalyzing waterborne system that is fast drying, and offers superior protection against moisture and household chemicals. The high solids formula builds to a beautiful and exceptionally durable film. This waterborne polyurethane finish is recommended as a self-sealing finish over properly prepared interior wood surfaces.

    John

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Jared Sankovich View Post
    I think you are mixing up the MegaVar solvent conversion varnish (tintable, KCMA rated) and the MegaVar wb clear poly ( not KCMA)
    What is KCMA rated
    Does anyone still shoot lacquer?

    Thanks?
    Carpe Lignum

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by phil harold View Post
    What is KCMA rated
    Does anyone still shoot lacquer?

    Thanks?
    If you mean solvent based lacquer, yes, folks still use it, but for safety, it really requires properly equipped spraying facilities and protective gear. Most home shops don't have the former for sure and "hopefully" anyone using it in that context is spraying it outside. It's very volatile.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    KCMA means Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association. They have a test protocol for testing finishes that relates to durability against foods, cleaners, etc. If a finish is KCMA rated it meets or exceeds that test protocol and gives you some assurance it will withstand the daily assault kitchen cabinets often are subjected to.

    John

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    I don't know about the solvent based one, but WB MegaVar is KCMA rated.

    Manufactured by Benjamin Moore & Co., 101 Paragon Drive, Montvale, NJ 07645 Tel: 866-708-9180 Fax: 888-248-2143 www.lenmar-coatings.com M72 1WB.50X US 060618
    MEGAVAR-WB
    PREMIUM WATERBORNE CLEAR POLYURETHANE FINISH
    1WB.50X
    Features General Description
     Non-Yellowing Formulation
    Exceeds KCMA Standards
     High Solids Content
     Ready To Spray Viscosity
     Self-Sealing
     Resists Moisture
     Resists chemicals
     No Pot Life
    Lenmar 1WB.50X MegaVar-WB Series of non-yellowing, high solids, waterborne finishes is designed for the professional woodworker who demands maximum performance and clarity in a clear finish. This product is a self-sealing, self-catalyzing waterborne system that is fast drying, and offers superior protection against moisture and household chemicals. The high solids formula builds to a beautiful and exceptionally durable film. This waterborne polyurethane finish is recommended as a self-sealing finish over properly prepared interior wood surfaces.

    John
    Apparently I didn't have enough coffee when I was looking over the TDS sheets.

    I swear I it was the other way around but the conversion varnish is not KCMA rated (which makes no sense in my mind) I guess I flipped them.

    Sorry for the bad information.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by phil harold View Post
    What is KCMA rated
    Does anyone still shoot lacquer?

    Thanks?
    Yep, I'm a fan of Lenmar's duralaq and ultralaq precat (solvent) lacquer.

  15. #15
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    Lexington, KY
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    Ive been spraying cabinet doors for the last two weeks. Our local Benjamin Moore store sold us Vermont Coatings C2 (cabinet and trim paint), and the store recommended to add a floetrol-like hardener/leveler also from Vermont Coatings called Polywhey. I sprayed it with my 4 stage Fuji hvlp and it came out great. I didnt have a larger nozzle, so I had to use my 1.3mm but it still sprayed well.

    the recipe I used was 4.8 ounces of Polywhey + 24 oz of paint + 4.5 oz of water. That gave me the recommended 20-25 seconds through my viscosity cup. I closed off the air on the gun, then turned it 1.75 turns open. Fan was a little over halfway open.

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