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Thread: I'm finally building my boat.

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Waldron View Post
    All that spruce is very nice, but you do realize, I suppose, you haven't yet posted pictures of your new spar bench. Do get with it, Malcolm!

    FA8CEBFE-F327-4224-9324-72A107385958.jpg

    I just boarded a plane. This is the only pic I have. Prior to sawing the chop flush to the top. ...or did you mean a bench just for the spars? That is called a “sawhorse”. :-)

  2. #62
    How many hens teeth fit in a bird's mouth joint?

    Back in the day, there were, in fact, dedicated spar benches, often spanning the full length of the shop and, for those who built taller masts, sometimes butting against a window so longer masts could stick outside. With the decline of wooden masts and the near disappearance of hollow wooden masts and other spars, spar makers have mostly lost their benches. Reduced to saw horses and other such kludges, it has become more difficult to keep to the straight and narrow. Be sure you have enough horses for the job; don't let the work sag or you may build in a curve that you don't want.

    This is in contrast to the shipwright's spiling bench. It would be erected alongside the framing so the planks could be spiled, backed out and scarfed as needed as close to the building hull as possible. It would typically be a length at least as long as the longest planking timbers, and perhaps longer if convenient. In first class shops, there would be a spiling bench on each side of the hull. Since carvel planking has become quite rare, the spiling bench is not so common, although similar benches are often employed for preparing glass fiber for application and wetting out with resin in molding fiber glass hulls and other structures.

    For the home builder, with no customer to absorb such ancillary costs, it is quite common to do without, substituting saw horses, labor and effort.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  3. #63
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    OK- Jim- Wasn't sure if you were talking about my Roubo build that I never posted an update about. By the way, the Lie-Nielsen Vise is the most amazing vise I've ever used- period. NO racking whatsoever, even at full extension.

    Anyway, back to the build- for the mast I am going to build a box beam to keep the mast straight during gluing. It will be clamped up with pipe clamps, and strapped to the box beam while curing. The beam will be covered in clear packing tape, which does not stick to epoxy. I'm using epoxy- it is what I know, what I trust, and gives a good slow cure time for such a large build.

    I just picked up this centerboard winch. I'm not sure it's going to work with my heavy board, but I pulled the trigger and I'm going to do some tests with it and see how fast it spools out in the event of an accidental freefall, which is my concern with this versus a block and tackle. The winch is just too cool to have passed up. If it doesn't work, I will keep it for a future project. It is solid bronze. The next question if it passes the tests I perform, is do I keep the patina, or do I soak it in vinegar and polish it up?
    Winch.jpg

    I'm cleaning up the shop this weekend and getting ready for parts making. I am sending the gudgeons and pintles off to be bronze cast. Exciting times in the Schweizer shop.

  4. #64
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    New boat, new patina.

    But that's just me..
    Please help support the Creek.

    If your car could travel at the speed of light, would your headlights work? - Steven Wright

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    New boat, new patina.

    But that's just me..
    I agree. Usually I’m not into patina, but this does look nice in green.

  6. #66
    A box beam or a torsion box makes a fine spar bench. It will surely make it easy to build a straight mast.

    And you may have my blessing to support your box beam on saw horses. It's not going to sag, and that's the point I wanted to emphasize.
    Last edited by James Waldron; Yesterday at 9:47 PM.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

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