Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456
Results 76 to 88 of 88

Thread: I'm finally building my boat.

  1. #76
    Kudos to you Malcolm!! Pretty ambitious project there. I want to encourage you now, so that when you are 80% done, burned out from sanding and making all the details after the hull and framing frustrates you, that you will remember this encouragement. That is when you will need it, not as much now.
    Here's another bit of encouraging: After I finished my boat, it became and still is the most fulfilling project I ever did both personally and as a professional maker, even though the boat was for me. I have done insane projects from a 17 foot conference table for MTV, to the largest dichroic atrium sculpture in the world, to the eight, 600 lb color-changing chandeliers I designed and built for WMU - nothing came close to the fulfillment I got from my boat. I still love pulling it out of storage every winter.

    Got Mahogony-bluebirddocks.jpgBoat-RubbedOutAfter.jpg9-1-decktrimming.JPG8-21-fullvu!.JPG1-27-drumsand.jpg
    Mfr of Dichrolam® - The gemstone Opal in sheet form, used by PRS, Fender, Martin etc, and Chatoyant Carbon Fiber™ - molded CF with higher 3D flash than Koa, seen in supercars to 1911 grips - Quilted, Wild Ribbon Flame, etc. in solid and veneer stock.
    Delta Unisaw, Rabbit QX-80-1290 80W Laser, 5 x 12 ft laminating ovens, Powermax 22/44, Accuspray guns, Covington diamond lap and the usual assortment of cool toys / tools.

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,972
    Blog Entries
    5
    Wow, John, that is amazing work. I love the coaming- I was worried about my coaming being difficult, but that's tops. I have seen your posts about the dichroic materials. I do a lot of abalone inlays and I am impressed with what you're doing with modern materials. Thanks for the motivation.

  3. #78
    Thanks Malcomb! The coaming was a slight challenge, especially since it had to match the deck radius (something like ten foot rad) and the conical seat, but I knew it would turn out cool (pic below). Thanks for noticing my dichroic materials. I only recently nailed the interlaminar adhesion chemistry well enough that it machines without delamination. So doing 1911 grips now and selling it as inlay stock / knife handle stock. That whole community has embraced it well.

    AftViewComp.JPGBS-Gripon1911.jpg1911-RedBurl-plusQuiltGuitar.jpg
    Mfr of Dichrolam® - The gemstone Opal in sheet form, used by PRS, Fender, Martin etc, and Chatoyant Carbon Fiber™ - molded CF with higher 3D flash than Koa, seen in supercars to 1911 grips - Quilted, Wild Ribbon Flame, etc. in solid and veneer stock.
    Delta Unisaw, Rabbit QX-80-1290 80W Laser, 5 x 12 ft laminating ovens, Powermax 22/44, Accuspray guns, Covington diamond lap and the usual assortment of cool toys / tools.

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,972
    Blog Entries
    5
    I worked on the centerboard case sides, which I lofted directly to the ribbon stripe ply. The bottom is curved to match the curvature of the bottom of the hull, hence the need for the spline for laying out. Out of respect for the designer, I covered the measurements in the photo of the drawing. It probably wouldn't matter, but typically ya have to buy plans to get those details. I just thought it might be interesting to see the drawing.

    image.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpg
    Last edited by Malcolm Schweizer; 12-16-2018 at 7:44 PM.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,972
    Blog Entries
    5
    I made a steam box for bending the stem bands. It has two levels of dowels for steaming multiple pieces in one go. That worked beautifully. This is the best steam box I've ever made, and I think it owes to using a larger pot and hose. It heated up really quick and worked like a charm. I drilled two holes at the far end with slightly less area than the inlet hose so it would draw steam through the box but not just blow out all the heat. Note- it was a bad idea to use a ceramic coated pot. It is hard to cut the hole for the hose. I used binder clips to hold the lid on so the steam was forced out the hose instead of pushing up the lid. Worked perfect.

    image.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpg

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    In the foothills of the Sandia Mountains
    Posts
    14,607
    Nice steam box!

    That’s a really lousy view. I don’t know how you deal with it..

    (waay jealous)
    Please help support the Creek.

    If your car could travel at the speed of light, would your headlights work? - Steven Wright

  7. #82
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,972
    Blog Entries
    5
    I prebent the wood for the stem bands with steam, then let it dry completely for a couple of days before gluing. I kept them clamped in the jig while drying, then unclamped for a bit to ensure they dried throughout. I used epoxy with a little thickener, but not too much- a runny ketchup consistency. I buttered both sides except the outer ones- but stupid me buttered both sides of one outer band, and it was too late because it was the last one- all others were already prepped. I slapped some clear packing tape over the side that wasn't supposed to be glued so the clamps didn't stick- problem solved. The tape sticks by surface tension to the epoxy. My forms are covered in the same tape as a release. I use this whenever using epoxy and I need some part not to be glued- cover that part with clear packing tape.

    One image shows how much spring back there was when the pieces were unclamped from the jig before gluing. After the epoxy cures there will be no spring back. I laid out both stems on one 4x4 sheet of ply because wood is expensive. It was a little tight but no issues. I was going to separate the two jigs but this was very easy to have it all on one sheet of ply. I only glued one at a time because I was worried the clamps would interfere with each other. Also the stern band has a really tight bend, so I glued it up in two stages- three strips at a time. I used fast cure for that and slow for the bow, which was very easy to laminate all in one go.

    image.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpg

    The glue is curing now. Next step is to build the boomkin, finish building the centerboard case, and cut out all the ribs. At the build site I will set up the building jig and use it first as a flat surface for building the birds mouth masts, and then it becomes the backbone for the build. With all the bits and pieces prebuilt in my home shop, the build will take shape rapidly when I start putting it all together. This is how John Welsford recommends the build be done, and I agree. You have everything there when you start the build. For example, when making the mast step and mast box, you know exactly the diameter of your mast after shaping it, down to the mm.

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,972
    Blog Entries
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    Nice steam box!

    That’s a really lousy view. I don’t know how you deal with it..

    (waay jealous)
    It's awful. I suffer through it. :-) What is killing me is seeing it, and wanting so bad to be out there, but having to press on with the build. I missed the last regatta, which takes place right there. I was watching my friends race and it was like being a sick kid with a window overlooking the playground. That said, boatbuilding is my happy place.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm Schweizer View Post
    ... I used epoxy with a little thickener, but not too much- a runny ketchup consistency...
    Better to prime with neat resin/catalyst mix before applying a mix thickened to peanut butter consistency for glue.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  10. #85
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,972
    Blog Entries
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by andy bessette View Post
    Better to prime with neat resin/catalyst mix before applying a mix thickened to peanut butter consistency for glue.
    Not for a laminate where you're joining flat surfaces in a bending jig. No need for a peanut butter consistency for that. If you have gaps or are gluing something into a blind space and need to slather it and then stick it into the unreachable area, then sure.

  11. You're missing the priming.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  12. #87
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,972
    Blog Entries
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by andy bessette View Post
    You're missing the priming.
    Roger that- I did prime, but failed to mention it- and when priming I am very careful to work it into the wood, which is where a lot of folks fail with epoxy- not working it well enough into the wood fibers before gluing up. I find West System to be especially sensitive to this. I was going to do this build with Raka, but the Raka I have on hand is old and I didn't have time to order more before starting, so I'm starting with West, which I can get locally. I'll probably stick with West for the rest of this build. If you've never tried Raka, give it a shot- really good stuff, and it's much less expensive than West. One Ocean Kayaks did some very extensive epoxy tests and Raka did very well, including UV testing for their UV inhibited resin. I've built a lot of surfboards and kayaks with it. I find it to be a bit less viscous than West- easier to wet out tight weave cloth. I abuse the stuff with UV exposure with no issues so far.

  13. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm Schweizer View Post
    ... If you've never tried Raka, give it a shot...
    I've been using WEST for over 40 years and, once you're setup with one system, it's difficult to rationalize changing, especially from such an excellent product as WEST.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •