Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 345678 LastLast
Results 91 to 105 of 109

Thread: I'm finally building my boat.

  1. #91
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    3,107
    Blog Entries
    6
    Here are the gudgeons and pintles. I polished one so you can see how it looks from the foundry next to how it looks after polishing. I used 120 grit on a belt sander to get the rough casting out. (Note: at the foundry they do very roughly grind them so they can see any flaws.) After that I used a random orbit sander progressing up to 320 grit, then hand sanded up to 2000, then buffed on a felt wheel. Note: the polished one isn’t finished- I skipped a few grits and went right to polishing just to see how easily it would polish. I will go back to the hand sanding and get those swirl scratches out and then repolish it.


    Wood plug next to casting.

    A841BB9D-43CF-4B5D-8CDF-E759F6C79618.jpg

    Rough cast untouched as it comes from the foundry next to sanded to 320 grit.

    89F67CC8-E491-4E49-87A1-20403F48722E.jpg


    Rough cast again next to polished, but this was a quick test and I will sand more and repolish. I only polished this one side for the test- you can still see swirl marks. The other side not shown is still at 320 grit. Will work on these in the evenings after Petra goes to bed.

    3C0E1896-C4C8-424C-8F4B-5D1FD68963E0.jpg

    Casting these cost $250. They are huge and take a lot of metal.


    Oh, I also bought all the hatches and storage bins, which were quite costly. This stuff adds up quick. I went with manufactured rather than making my own wood ones. They are at my warehouse so I can’t get pics right now.
    Last edited by Malcolm Schweizer; 01-16-2019 at 3:28 PM.

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    16
    Your work looks amazing, I can see progress on your craft and I can't wait for the finished product.

  3. #93
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Yorktown, VA
    Posts
    2,434
    Sad news. Please accept our deepest sympathies on the loss of your mother.

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    In the foothills of the Sandia Mountains
    Posts
    14,801
    Malcolm, I'm so sorry to hear of the passing of your mother.
    Please help support the Creek.

    My mechanic told me, "I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder."

    - Steven Wright

  5. #95
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    Malcolm, I'm so sorry to hear of the passing of your mother.

    Had not seen that, Malcolm. Wishing you and your family comfort in your faith and memory.

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    3,107
    Blog Entries
    6
    Much appreciated, everyone. The circle of life continues on.

  7. #97
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    3,107
    Blog Entries
    6
    Wifey is back from Spain, so I'll have more time to work on this boat. Thought I would share an image my friend sent to me. This is from a National Geographic, 1940. This is where I'm building the boat. Right by the tree to the right in this picture!!! It hasn't changed at all.

    Shop Space.jpg

    I'm not sure if I already mentioned this, but I ordered the propane outboard, propane tank, black box radio, and also some solar panels so that they are all here during the piecing together of the build. One of the solar panels will be mounted on a mock sliding companionway that will be removable to move to wherever the sun is positioned.

  8. #98
    Nice venue!
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  9. #99
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    3,107
    Blog Entries
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by James Waldron View Post
    Nice venue!
    The builing to the left has the original brick roof. It's a flat lattice with bricks laid between each lattice. I will try to get a picture of it. Really amazing that it has lasted so long. One would think over time the wood would bow and the mortar crack. My neighbor's house has the same construction and the brick still holds up to this day.

    The gold brick is from Denmark, and would have been brought over as ballast. It is from the early 1800's.

  10. #100
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    3,107
    Blog Entries
    6
    When I started this build long ago, I lofted it to 1/8" door skins as 1/2 templates. Shortly after we moved to a place with no room to build, and I stored the templates. Finally got them out, checked everything over, and figured the best way to lay them out on the ply. It really made things easy. This also ensures symmetry as long as you are really careful to line them up, which isn't hard since all have either a flat bottom or a long center line. I laid everything out on the ply, and then cut them out with a 6.5" (or is it 6"?) circular saw. Since this is a lapstrake boat, each strake lands on a flat, so a circular saw works fine. The deck curvature is shallow enough that I was able to use it for the bow forms as well.

    I used the veritas things that fit in your dog holes and fit 2x4's to raise a 4x8 3/4" sacrificial ply below the 9mm ply for the forms, and set the depth to 9mm on the saw. I used hole saws for the rounded portions of the cutouts. It was a little sloppy, so I went and got a better set of Milwaukees, but they were out of the 3" so I got a Diablo for the 3". I think I like the Diablo better.

    There are holes on the bottom of the forms called "limber holes" to let water flow through the bilge to the bilge pump.

    Here are pics. I put one form next to the bed for scale. So far I have only cut 3 of the 8 forms, and then each form gets a doubler on the front side for the top 3 plank landings, and on the other side they get circular doublers at each stringer landing. When I get to that point, this will make more sense than me explaining it.

    image.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpg

    Edit- rough cut to just shy of the line and I will trim with a small block plane. To the person who sold me the NX-60, it will be lovingly used for this.
    Last edited by Malcolm Schweizer; 02-18-2019 at 7:04 PM.

  11. #101
    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm Schweizer View Post
    ...I will trim with a small block plane...
    Don't forget to allow for the bevels.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  12. #102
    Right! And we'll be right here to instruct you on everything about every step along the way. Since it's your first rodeo, you'll obviously need all the coaching you can get.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  13. #103
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    3,107
    Blog Entries
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by James Waldron View Post
    Right! And we'll be right here to instruct you on everything about every step along the way. Since it's your first rodeo, you'll obviously need all the coaching you can get.
    But I bought the Gudgeon Brothers' book, so I'm good now.

  14. #104
    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm Schweizer View Post
    But I bought the Gudgeon Brothers' book, so I'm good now.
    As long as you remember, there's no substitute for advice and guidance from the Internet.
    Fair winds and following seas,
    Jim Waldron

  15. #105
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    3,107
    Blog Entries
    6
    All the forms are cut with the exception of a million notches for stringers, and each form still gets doublers on one side and circular doublers on the other at each notch- lots of work there. I set up the forms and center case side as a mock-up of the boat to see how big she will be. It also lets me see how big the V-berth will be, and it’s perfect. The plan is to come just a few inches past the edge of the center case and the berth acts as support for the center case. I like it. It will be a little cramped, but all I wanted was a space to dodge weather and to sleep when camping. The cabin is open to the rest of the boat, i.e. no rear bulkhead.

    79827C7A-5C44-49EF-BB69-2296ACA1FF2F.jpg C4747705-B70F-495C-8DD5-CCAEFD5ADF46.jpg 790AC8BD-F762-4E3C-B05D-631BFB9DC01F.jpg

    The motor mounts to the next to last rib, and the hole in the last one gets cut out to the bottom after installing. A motor well is built and fiberglassed from the mount to the stern. The motor tilts up and stows when sailing, and a plug goes in the hole in the bottom to prevent slosh.

    FFBA2693-9324-4A46-88D9-39C885514C5E.jpg

    A spokeshave came in handy for all the inside curves. A pair of Veritas skewed rabbeting block planes allowed me to trim the outer edges to the line as they lay on the work table. After setup on the building jig, a fairing batten is used to fair them. Trying to get the angle right now would be guesswork. For now they are trimmed flush and square. All the stringers have to be trimmed on edge as well after setup. Lots of hand work, which I enjoy.

    I am sorting out the best place to stow electronics. I think behind the forward bulkhead. It’s dry and has a lot of air space for heat dissipation. The solar controller is sensitive to heat. Since I’m using a black box radio, this allows me to mount it next to the mast and have easy access for connecting the VHF antenna. The mic can mount on the center case, as will the plotter. A battery box will be aft of the center case in a waterproof wood and glass enclosure and that will also add support to the center case, and add ballast centered in the boat.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •