Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Table Saw Tilt

  1. #1

    Table Saw Tilt

    I'm looking to buy a new table saw. Some are listed as "left tilt". Is there a reason to have a left tilt vs right tilt? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    19,790
    "Tastes Great" versus "Less Filling". Either will work. I prefer left tilt. Bevel cuts are the main driver for me. I use a tablesaw for so much more than ripping and crosscutting. Your use will probably drive your "tolerance" for a right tilt.

    This subject can yield near-endless discussion but, here's a link that will supply you some use data: https://www.finewoodworking.com/2007...tilt-tablesaws

    You will also find many threads here on the subject: right tilt, left tilt site:www.sawmillcreek.org
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 06-15-2018 at 5:38 PM.
    I am familiar with modern idioms but they are outside the vocabulary of what I want to say.

    - George Dyson (composer)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,889
    Eh, come see, come saw. I went with left tilt since thats what SawStops are
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

  4. #4
    Thanks for the links Glenn

  5. #5
    Maybe if the left wing of the saw was replaced with a miter slider, the right tilt blade might seem more ergonomic.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Leesville, SC
    Posts
    2,243
    My table saw was a gift so it will be my last table saw. It is a right tilt and I can honestly say that I would never buy a right tilt table saw. I don't even know why they make a right tilt. Watch some woodworking television shows and see what they are using.
    Army Veteran 1968 - 1970
    NRA Lifetime Member
    I Support the Second Amendment of the US Constitution

  7. #7
    I prefer left tilt after owning and using both.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Itapevi, SP - Brazil
    Posts
    465
    According to PTI the fence would be at the same side of blade tilt for better safety... so if you prefer to rip with the fence to the right of your blade, look for right tilt blade, if you prefer to rip with fence to the left of the blade, go to left tilt saw blade.

    It makes sense when you think about backslash.

    All the best,

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    4,712
    There are pros and cons to both tilt directions, and it really boils down to a matter of preference. Right tilt bevels toward the fence on a standard bevel cut, which is considered less safe than if it beveled away from the fence. You can move the fence to the left of the blade for safer bevel cuts, but that makes it a non-standard operation, which is still not quite as safe as a bevel cut on a left tilt saw. On Left tilt saws the blade bevels away from the fence with the fence on the right of the blade (standard location), which is considered safer.

    The downside of a left tilt saw is that any changes in blade thickness will skew the zero reference on the tape measure because the left side of the blade registers on the right side of the flange (the same direction as the tape measure reads). This can be adjusted by recalibrating the cursor, always using blades of the same thickness, using shims as spacers, or just measuring by hand. Blade thickness changes make no difference with a right tilt saw because the right side of the blade registers against the left side of the flange, so changes in blade thickness don’t impact the tape measure. Another difference is that the arbor nut on a right tilt saw gets applied from the left side of the blade and uses a reverse thread orientation, which is typically done with your left hand. The arbor nut on a left tilt saw goes on from the right side (easy for right handers) and uses a normal thread orientation.
    Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    5,438
    Scott is right on (not a pun!). Some other responses had me scratching my head.

    I think most people make beveled cuts (and when I say beveled I mean over 30 degrees when the blade could pinch the wood) about 0.005% of the time. It’s such a small percentage of cuts I don’t think it really should be a factor. And on top of that, just move the fence to the left of the blade and poof, no “safety issue”.

    I’ve never said “wow I really wish I had a left tilt saw right now”, and yes I have had left tilt saws. I think the left tilt is safer thing is mainly hype to make you buy a new saw.

    Keeping the zero mark on your fence ruler is a nice benefit too especially if you change blades a lot.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    859
    Thanks Matt. I knew he arguments that Scoot made but I'd didn't realize that it was only for cuts greater than 30 degrees.
    Marshall
    ---------------------------
    A Stickley fan boy.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Leesville, SC
    Posts
    2,243
    If your fence is on the right, and you have a right tilt saw, your work piece will be trapped between the fence and the blade.
    If your fence is on the right, and you have a left tilt saw, your work piece and the waster piece can move freely.
    Army Veteran 1968 - 1970
    NRA Lifetime Member
    I Support the Second Amendment of the US Constitution

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    5,438
    Quote Originally Posted by Marshall Harrison View Post
    Thanks Matt. I knew he arguments that Scoot made but I'd didn't realize that it was only for cuts greater than 30 degrees.
    My point was that if you only tilt the blade a minor amount the whole trapping the work piece thing is moot. If you’re cutting a 45 degree cut yes there is a chance it could pinch, but, keep pressure against the fence and it’s fine.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •