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Thread: New Mig

  1. #1
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    New Mig

    Thinking about buying my first welder. Probably going a bit overboard on size, but looking at the Miller 212 Autoset. A good welder or not? I like the Miller line and if I decide down the road to sell it, it should command a decent return. Or I hope it should.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory King View Post
    Thinking about buying my first welder. Probably going a bit overboard on size, but looking at the Miller 212 Autoset. A good welder or not? I like the Miller line and if I decide down the road to sell it, it should command a decent return. Or I hope it should.
    I have owned Miller, Hobart and Lincoln and new never got close to what I considered a fair price when I sold used. No market, people who spend a lot on a welder usually need to put it on credit card. You can sell $100-$200 used all the time. I ended up selling my last Hobart 140 120 volt only and buying this instead. Its just as good or better than any of the name brands I have owned. Lots of improvements over their general POS welders. Harbor Freight with a one year like it or leave it warranty, 120 or 240 volts and it works on both, and its wonderful to weld with...MIGMax™ 215 Welder with 120/240 Volt Input

    http://www.harborfreight.com/migmax-...put-63617.html
    Last edited by Bill George; 06-14-2018 at 4:23 PM.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa. , Ray Fine 20w Galvo Fiber laser , LightObject 40w CO2 Laser and Chiller, MakerGear M2 3D Printer. Qe60+ Vinyl cutter. Fine Line Automation 4x4 CNC Router

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory King View Post
    Thinking about buying my first welder. Probably going a bit overboard on size, but looking at the Miller 212 Autoset. A good welder or not? I like the Miller line and if I decide down the road to sell it, it should command a decent return. Or I hope it should.
    I have the Millermatic 211 with autoset. Excellent machine, I rarely have to take it off the auto mode. I don't know how it compares to the 212 except it looks a lot smaller and more portable. I have it and my TIG welder on carts that hold the gas cylinders and have three drawers for accessories and helmet.

    I don't remember what I paid for it and have no any idea about the resell value. I don't think I've thought about that even once on anything I've bought.

    JKJ

  4. #4
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    All my stuff now is dual voltage, invertor based and very portable. Ready for the downsize to retirement village if and when. I don't know what I would do without a shop. I had the very wonderful Miller does everything, TIG Mig Stick and even had the spool gun. Sold for less than 1/2 what I paid because I was either stick welding or MIG. Too much just setting around. Young fellow purchased was going in the welding business and it was perfect for him. I seldom use what I have now.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa. , Ray Fine 20w Galvo Fiber laser , LightObject 40w CO2 Laser and Chiller, MakerGear M2 3D Printer. Qe60+ Vinyl cutter. Fine Line Automation 4x4 CNC Router

  5. #5
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    Gregory, for less $ you can buy a Lincoln 210MP, which is a more versatile machine that also has the auto set features.

    In addition to MIG (the 210MP will do .023, .030, .035 and .045 flux and solid MIG wire), you can stick weld (SMAW) and DC TIG weld with the Lincoln. The Miller won't let you do that.

    The Lincoln will operate off of either 120 or 240VAC.

    The 211 is rated for slightly thicker steel on MIG than the 210 (3/8 versus 5/16") on MIG, but the 210 will weld thicker steel by using SMAW. The duty cycles between the two different machines are similar.

    Just something to consider.

  6. #6
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    Greg, I'm certainly not an expert but I'd say you can't go wrong with either a Miller or a Lincoln. They are like the Lincolns (car) and Cadillacs of welders. Hobart is also very good but more like a Buick. That said and the fact that you're concerned about resell value would beg the question as to how much you think you would use a welder and for what kind of jobs. For instance, many folks not familiar with welders don't realize that your metal must be clean in order to get a good MIG weld. Arc welders on the other hand can weld the ugliest pieces of metal you can find which is why farmers like them.

    But if you don't think you're going to use a MIG welder that much it's hard to justify buying a $2000 machine. You might consider buying a name brand used welder first and get some experience with it and, more importantly, see how much you use it. After that, if you still want a newer machine you should be able to get most of what you paid for the used one.

    Many years ago my first MIG welder was a Harbor Freight 151. The price was right but I could never seem to get good looking welds. Then about 15 years ago I bought a well used Lincoln 170 from a guy who had his own welding business. It was a night and day difference compared to the HF machine. I've made many projects with the Lincoln since then including a tandem axle trailer and several attachment for my tractor and all I've ever had to do was replace the liner once which is a minimal cost. I've even welded 3/4" thick steel (multiple passes) with it. At times I've thought about buying a newer, fancier welder but since I have something that has always met my needs I'd rather spend the money on a new woodworking tool(s).

  7. #7
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    I was asking this same question while back,but got different answers.My question was what welder so that I can weld with stopping to let the machine cool down.And I wanted to weld maybe up to 1/2 plate say for about hr straight other than short stops to move down alittle or just to wipe sweat.Anyway lots of people suggested the Miller 252 but avoid the 250,251 I think.Well working at a school district in main, dept I went over to couple high schools to see what they are using.Well its the Miller 252,I was told that this would be the last welder I would ever need.Well heck I guess so I'm 64 ha!

  8. #8
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    Sure, If all you going to need is a non portable 230 volt machine for production welding and have $2600 to spend go for it. What are you doing spending hours on end welding heavy duty steel plate building a ship? I am 74 and right after I retired 10 years ago I built a 3 point backhoe for my tractor. Even welding that up I just used a Hobart DC stick welder and a Miller MIG, both together never cost over $1600. None of my welds have broken yet.

    Oh this is your first welder. I think you need to get some experience first and you will find out nobody welds 1/2 inch thick steel plate In one pass with a MIG! At least in a home or farm shop.
    Last edited by Bill George; 06-15-2018 at 5:03 PM.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa. , Ray Fine 20w Galvo Fiber laser , LightObject 40w CO2 Laser and Chiller, MakerGear M2 3D Printer. Qe60+ Vinyl cutter. Fine Line Automation 4x4 CNC Router

  9. #9
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    Bill did I hit a nerve,no need to blow up over my opinion vs your opinion.I will bow down to you.I miss out on a used 252 while back so I kick myself since that is on my dream list to own what the pros use such as yourself.I did not see his parameters so I just use my wish list,if I want to build a ship I may have the welding machine to do so.Like my old father inlaw use to say"Better to have it than to want it" Gregory what ever you pick have fun,thats what its all about. Future contestant for new game show "Grump Old Men"

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory King View Post
    Thinking about buying my first welder. Probably going a bit overboard on size, but looking at the Miller 212 Autoset. A good welder or not? I like the Miller line and if I decide down the road to sell it, it should command a decent return. Or I hope it should.
    Gregory looks like your post got side tracked, in spite of all that has been said you can not go wrong with a Miller. I have had Lincolns and they were fine I just preferred Blue. Its hard to find a good used machine, just buy what you want new and you do have a darn good warranty with Miller. I have never used the warranty on any of mine. There was a place online out in Indiana that sold way cheaper than anyone else and I have purchased a lot from them. Now you can find good deals at times at Northern Tool, TSC and now Fleet Farm.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa. , Ray Fine 20w Galvo Fiber laser , LightObject 40w CO2 Laser and Chiller, MakerGear M2 3D Printer. Qe60+ Vinyl cutter. Fine Line Automation 4x4 CNC Router

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Maybe I'm wrong, but I thought the 212 was a 211 on a cart? Nothing wrong with the 211, I have one and it's a great little machine. Can get a 252 for a little more than a 212, and I'd definitely recommend a 252. The reason I ask is that a 211 is $1200, the 212 looks to be around $2000, and the 252 is about $2500. If the 212 is the same as the 212, there is no benefit to spending more. The 252 is a higher function machine.

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