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Thread: New Mig

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    244


    I have the Lincoln 256 power mig. I don't use it too often anymore so to keep the liner clean of rust when I'm done with a project I'll pull the stinger and store it dry and put it in a drawer. I think it's a good idea to pull the spool too ...and keep a spare liner handy.
    Last edited by Lawrence Duckworth; 06-15-2022 at 9:19 PM. Reason: clarity

  2. I went with the Miller Multimatic 215. Multi process for stick, mig, flux core, aluminum, tig, and got a Spoolmate 150 to do aluminum if needed. I might get a Miller 255 at some point as well.
    Remember, in a moments time, everything can change!

    Vision - not just seeing what is, but seeing what can be!




  3. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
    Location
    Redmond, OR
    Posts
    424
    I have had the same Lincoln 180 MIG for 20 years now and the guy I bought it from had it for at least 10 years before that. I will probably have it for the rest of my life because I don't think it will ever die and it has always done everything I have needed it to do. About 5 years ago I did replace the pinch feed rollers but that is about it. There is nothing fancy about it, 2 dials and a power switch. The welding store wire seems like it lays down a better weld than the Harbor Freight cheap wire but that could very well just be my expectations that it is better because I paid more.

    When it came time to finally buy a plasma cutter I went with a cheap Chinese plasma cutter of decent size (65amp - 110v/220v) off of Amazon. I have had it for about a year now with no problems. It does seem to do a better job than my friends cheap Chinese 50 amp plasma cutter.

    Just FYI: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    Last edited by Michael Schuch; 06-16-2022 at 1:13 PM.

  4. #34
    Iím was a Union fitter/welder by trade. As a young man I had to go out onto the road to prove that old axiom that the ďrolling stone gathers no moss.Ē That with the associated bad habits which the road provides made it easy I was slick back in the day, able to pretty much pass any test on any process. 40-50 yrs later I have the non-inverter 211 and am very happy with it. About 20 yrs ago I was hot to get back into tig, which I loved and was very good at. I bought a Miller Syncrowave which gave me tig and stick.I have no problem with stick but the tigÖomg, between the foot pedal, the feed hand, the torch and general rustiness I was way way behind. I knew I could get my hand back, but also knew that it was going to take a lot of time and practice to be slick again. I was very busy in my business and knew I was never going to put the time in, and donít fool yourself, it takes time to be really good. A friend took the Synchro off my hands and I got the 211 which has been excellent and that I can pick up after long spells and do well with it. A good auto darkening helmet is a bonus to any welder, especially a newbie. Iíve had a couple of the Millers and about 5 yrs or so ago bought the Lincoln Viking W/cheater and it too has been excellent. Today, with a good machine, tons of experience and a good hood I still find that in order for me to do good work I have to be able to get right on the work, meaning I have to be able to directly see or look straight at it. I just canít see for position welds. I cannot tip me head enough to get my bifocals to let me see clearly what is going on. My suggestion for new welders is buy a mig machine and spend the time getting good with it. You can learn most of what will apply to other processes., heat, angle, tie-ins, etc. Trying to master multiple processes at the same time? Sure it can be done, but I still think it better to master one and then expand your scope, if you so desire.
    Last edited by Jack Frederick; 07-01-2022 at 6:47 PM. Reason: Grammar

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
    Posts
    877
    I got to sit in as helper to some Professional welders at Newport News. One elderly Gentleman in particular absolutely blew my mind with his skill.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,405
    Yo Jack, that's good advice. I worked with hundreds of the best welders in this country when I was a young man so I appreciate your input. I was a hell of a good welding inspector in my day and I am qualified to say that my own welding skills are terrible, only suitable for my own shop

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    11,845
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Outten View Post
    Yo Jack, that's good advice. I worked with hundreds of the best welders in this country when I was a young man so I appreciate your input. I was a hell of a good welding inspector in my day and I am qualified to say that my own welding skills are terrible, only suitable for my own shop
    Same here, I was a welding inspector for years (industrial, structrual, and nuclear specs) but my own welding skills were a joke. It wasnít until I got my own little welder, some books, and a bunch of practice until I could weld anything I wanted and pass my own inspection. Today I have gas, ac/dc stick, mig, and tig welders and can reasonably fix or build about anything I need. A shed full of stock, a good horizontal bandsaw, and a plasma cutter add a lot to the game. I havenít used the abrasive chop saw for years now - anyone need it?

    JKJ

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,405
    My situation is similar to yours John except I still can't pass my own weld inspection
    I upgraded my cheap metal cutting band saw to a really nice Baileigh model and purchased a Miller plasma cutter. Stored my old abrasive saw in a shed just in case I have to work on a job away from my shop. I also purchased a mag drill that I can barely lift, its very heavy but a very capable drilling machine that is invaluable on some jobs. Most of my metal work is custom sign hangers and occasionally a new attachment for my tractor.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    318
    Guaranteed my welding will never pass any test for sure fellas. I just luv playing with this 211 though. The first thing I repaired was a rolling chair in my shop. Added 1/8" gussets to the top plate. Turned out well. Have repaired a couple of push mower decks since that time,

    I've got to get in a touch closer to the work area yet. Part of getting comfortable with this new line of recreation.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    318
    Also, forgot to mention that I picked up some .030 tips at our local Princess Auto[ Harbor Freight]. Back of package said they would fit Miller products. But they don't fit the MDX-100 gun. Lesson learned

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    11,845
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory King View Post
    Also, forgot to mention that I picked up some .030 tips at our local Princess Auto[ Harbor Freight]. Back of package said they would fit Miller products. But they don't fit the MDX-100 gun. Lesson learned
    Iíve learned to shop at the industrial supply company where I bought my welders - they know what fits what, the quality is high, and the prices reasonable. (I have a 211) I use mine a lot around the farm, most recently to reinforce the ramps and how they connect to an 18í gooseneck trailer so I can load my excavator with confidence. And on the other end of the spectrum even thin sheet metal is easy.

    Have you welded with TIG? I found it much like welding with a torch as far as applying the filler rod. Very clean, too, even better than MIG for thin sheet metal. One book I read said it was the only type of welding you can do wearing a white suit and keep it clean. 😎

    Lately weíve had a revival of welding here at the farm. The girl who works with the horses is in welding school, quickly got a job after just a few months, and wants to weld everything in sight! She said we have better equipment here than the school. Iíve been told there is a serious shortage of weldors, at least those who can do good work, at least in this area.

    JKJ

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    318
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Iíve learned to shop at the industrial supply company where I bought my welders - they know what fits what, the quality is high, and the prices reasonable. (I have a 211) I use mine a lot around the farm, most recently to reinforce the ramps and how they connect to an 18í gooseneck trailer so I can load my excavator with confidence. And on the other end of the spectrum even thin sheet metal is easy.

    Have you welded with TIG? I found it much like welding with a torch as far as applying the filler rod. Very clean, too, even better than MIG for thin sheet metal. One book I read said it was the only type of welding you can do wearing a white suit and keep it clean. 😎

    Lately weíve had a revival of welding here at the farm. The girl who works with the horses is in welding school, quickly got a job after just a few months, and wants to weld everything in sight! She said we have better equipment here than the school. Iíve been told there is a serious shortage of weldors, at least those who can do good work, at least in this area.

    JKJ
    John: I went back to the Miller dealer to get the proper tips. The five tips at Princess Auto were $12. The proper 10 pack at Miller were $22.

    I've ordered a roll of the .023 wire and tips to try on the thinner metal. Suspect the .030 is a bit much for rusty mower decks.

    If i ever get more confident in the 211, I may try the Tig. The mention of it sounds scary, but the newer models seem to be more suited to the average Joe

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    318
    Listen to this. The salesman at Praxair [Miller] told me that a customer took a tap to the end of the gun so that it would accept the other kind of tips. WOW! What some folks won't do!

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Iowa USA
    Posts
    3,832
    I just order off Amazon they have the name brand ones and you do not need to drive all over town. Home Depot carries a lot also, zero difference between Lincoln tips at Home Depot or your LWS, except the price!

    BTW I have 2.5 x magnifying safety glasses instead of cheater lens and Yes you need to get down and see the weld, something I never worried about when I was younger.
    Last edited by Bill George; 07-03-2022 at 7:49 PM.
    Retired Guy- Central Iowa. , LightObject 40w CO2 Laser and Chiller , WorkBee 1000x750 CNC Router - Mach4 - Windows 10

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in the Land of Lincoln
    Posts
    2,233
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I’ve learned to shop at the industrial supply company where I bought my welders - they know what fits what, the quality is high, and the prices reasonable. (I have a 211) I use mine a lot around the farm, most recently to reinforce the ramps and how they connect to an 18’ gooseneck trailer so I can load my excavator with confidence. And on the other end of the spectrum even thin sheet metal is easy.

    Have you welded with TIG? I found it much like welding with a torch as far as applying the filler rod. Very clean, too, even better than MIG for thin sheet metal. One book I read said it was the only type of welding you can do wearing a white suit and keep it clean. 

    Lately we’ve had a revival of welding here at the farm. The girl who works with the horses is in welding school, quickly got a job after just a few months, and wants to weld everything in sight! She said we have better equipment here than the school. I’ve been told there is a serious shortage of weldors, at least those who can do good work, at least in this area.

    JKJ
    As someone with literally thousands of hours TIG welding I agree that it can weld very thin stock. When the metal working bandsaw blade welder was broken I welded bandsaw blade together. Maybe not the best scenario but you do what you gotta do. It held just fine even though it might not have been properly annealed. We couldn't get small enough rod for die part repair so we made a fixture to grind 1/16" rod down to about 1/32". We could run a bead about the size of pencil lead.

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