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Thread: Everything is made in China, right?

  1. #1
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    Everything is made in China, right?

    That's the wisdom and running joke that everybody knows. So imagine my surprise to see this...

    61ogduo2nBL._SY450_.jpg


    IMG_1726.jpg



    Yes, that's right. Chinese-style soy sauce. Not made in China.

  2. #2
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    That is an interesting combination! And it's good to see it's coming from a place that can benefit from some economic uplift.

    But face it...stuff is made where it's made. Despite the fact that some folks don't appreciate it, we do live in a global economy. What makes it even more fun is that everything is constantly moving around as individual countries' internal focuses naturally shift. I almost never even look at origination any more other than occasional curiosity.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    Yeah, I mostly don't care where things come from. I just happened to notice this recently after using the product for years. And found it funny when "everything is made in China" is kind of taken as a given. I like irony.

    And BTW, for anyone restricting sodium as I am, this is the only really low sodium soy I've ever found. Regular is over 1g per tbsp, "low" sodium is 500-something mg per tbsp, and this is only 145mg.

  4. #4
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    I just got back from Cusco, Peru and the placemats in the hotel I stayed at were made in the USA!
    IMG_0476 (Medium).jpeg
    From the workshop under the staircase, Clinton Township, MI
    Semper Audere!

  5. #5
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    My soy sauce, sold by Aldi, is made in Canada.

  6. #6
    We grow Wasabi on Vancouver Island too.

  7. #7
    I used to go to a Japanese steakhouse/hibachi restaurant and asked a few chefs what part of Japan they were from and everyone said China.

  8. #8
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    Actually I know them well. They got hit hard by the drought a few years back and I guess they are pushing their other products now. The drought destroyed the scotchbonnet crop in the Caribbean and if you had any you could almost name your price.

    Jamaica has a large Chinese population and some amazing Chinese restaurants.

  9. #9
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    Some may have listened to a story Planet Money did on NPR a few years ago (actually five and I thought it was 2 or 3) where they pre-sold T-shirts then had them made, following the materials from the fields in the southern US to them being delivered to their offices. It was pretty interesting. Where the cotton was made into thread was an automated plant in the far east, perhaps Indonesia (don't recall for sure), but on the factory floor, it was like a clean room. Nobody allowed in, fully automated.

    Anyway, here is a link if you want to watch a video they did of the story. The materials traveled the Pacific several times before being completed.

    https://apps.npr.org/tshirt/#/title
    I am in love with Montana. For other states I have admiration, respect, recognition, even some affection, but with Montana it is love.... It seems to me that Montana is a great splash of grandeur....the mountains are the kind I would create if mountains were ever put on my agenda. Montana seems to me to be what a small boy would think Texas is like from hearing Texans. Montana has a spell on me. It is grandeur and warmth. Of all the states it is my favorite and my love.

    John Steinbeck


  10. #10
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    Kikkoman has been brewing soy sauce in Walworth Wisconsin since the early 1980's. The facility produces 29 million gallons per year making it the highest-producing soy sauce plant globally.

    http://www.kikkomanusa.com/foodservi...ofsoysauce.php

  11. #11
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    Kinda makes sense when you consider just how much soy is grown in North America...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    Around here, nearly all sushi joints are run by Koreans, with some Mexican cooks hidden in back. I'm only aware of one sushi place run by a person from Japan. A lot has to do with how many Korean wives came back to Fort Huachuca with their GIs after the war. There's some great Korean food around the base.

    We grow Wasabi on Vancouver Island too.
    Hmm, wonder if I can get my hands on some. I *love* fresh wasabi. Most people don't know, but the normal paste blob of "wasabi" you get isn't actually made from wasabi.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Kinda makes sense when you consider just how much soy is grown in North America...
    That 29m gallons is just for the domestic market. Amazing how much of the stuff is consumed here.

  14. #14
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    I *love* fresh wasabi. Most people don't know, but the normal paste blob of "wasabi" you get isn't actually made from wasabi.
    One of my recent enjoyments has been Charlie's Salsa - Tomatillo Wasabi. It was great blended with a jar of Roasted Verde Salsa. Cooked it up with an onion, a diced up chicken (bones removed of course), some jalapeņo peppers and lovage. Lovage taste like celery but stronger, it also helps to counter heartburn or other discomfort one might encounter from a 'spicy' meal.

    The Chicken Verde can be eaten in a tortilla or over rice, Mmmmmmmmmmm.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  15. #15
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    Oh my god. Two loves...tomatillos and wasabi. Wow.

    Ordered. Along with some wasabi mustard and a couple other things.

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