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Thread: Job site tablesaw

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    5,531
    I cut my thumb on my table saw one time. I would recommend a Sawstop for safety.

    http://www.rockler.com/sawstop-10-in-jobsite-saw?
    Last edited by lowell holmes; 06-20-2018 at 4:56 PM.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Upland, CA
    Posts
    1,201
    Problems with all of the Jobsite Saws is that none of them have a full set of features and I'm not sure that is even possible as they are targeted at different uses. Some of them really shine on one feature and some of them have something that is just terrible. If one really works for you it is going to be because you like the one thing it does well and don't mind the one thing it does poorly.
    Examples are:
    The Skil has the ability to cut deeper than all the others but it is sloppy and now that Skil is not owned by Bosch, the support is terrible.
    The Sawstop has the safety feature and a great portable stand that actually makes moving and setting up that massively overweight pig reasonably pleasant. HORRIBLE designed throatplate that mean there is no way you will ever have a ZCI on that.
    All the Dewalts have a mix of good/bad features. All of them have fabulous fences but falling down a bit on the later built ones on execution. The small ones have a folding stand that means you are lifting the saw (and killing your back) onto a flimsy, unstable stand that doesn't move. The larger ones like the 7491 pictured above are the only ones that have solid legs and a larger more stable base that actually means some safety cutting big stuff. You slightly lose on portability. Easy to move around but not so quick to setup as one that actually keeps two wheels on the ground and sacrifices stability for fast movabiltiy. Think Dewalt is the only one that will run a Dado, not that running a Dado on a Jobsite is actually what you would choose as first choice.
    Makita makes nice units with a high price and miss many modern features.
    Rigid units can be found on sale for nothing so can be great for the money while not being very great overall.
    You pay your money and make your choice. Not like any of them fit any one person's needs.
    I bought a DWE7491 even though I'm not a Dewalt fan in general. I looked at the Sawstop and wouldn't have taken it at the same price let alone paid more than double for it. The bigger Bosch was the same price as the DWE7191 and came from my favorite tool dealer instead of the evil, evil Lowes. In the end it came down to fantastic fence, great dust collection, great stability with the wide spread steel legs. It came down to what fit my needs and someone else will have different needs. Don't ever forget that they all need better blades........And don't forget that all universal motors are loud, which means all jobsite saws.
    Last edited by Greg R Bradley; 06-20-2018 at 11:12 PM.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kapolei Hawaii
    Posts
    2,777
    If you want a JOBSITE saw, for less than 400 bucks, you should not expect ANY accuracy. That is what a jobsite saw is. Rough. Fast. Rip a 4x in one pass. Not have to flip it over. If you want a nice cut, then you don't want a jobsite saw. And you should fork out some bucks. A Sawstop would be nice........

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Peoria, AZ
    Posts
    819
    I achieved excellent accuracy with my Dewalt. Didn't expect it, but got it.

  5. #35
    There is nothing wrong with the Dewalt! But they left the big boy market and went consumer. Most Dewalt built are not 240 V. Once you go to 240 V you are generally looking for more horsepower. As soon as you get up to the 240v Single phase you will start opening up your eyes to three phase machines. This opens up a new can of worms.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Peoria, AZ
    Posts
    819
    I assure you I've got zero interest in three phase, and can't imagine I'll ever get rid of my Unisaw. The Dewalt was great for what it was, and I was just commenting on the allegations that it can't be accurate, since I experienced otherwise.

  7. #37
    Iím so confused one minute itís a dewalt then rigid what about delta?

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Callender View Post
    I’m so confused one minute it’s a dewalt then rigid what about delta?
    You should be confused, because everyone here is either relating to their own experience and/or the lack of it. When it comes to job site saws, they are what they are: for site work, not for work expected of high precision and accuracy. Any inaccuracies are fixed during the time of assembly or installation. You get what you pay for.

    There are so many job site saw reviews or shoot outs (eg https://www.protoolreviews.com/tools...hootout/24024/). Simple google and pick a saw that meets your budget. At the end of the day, for the kind of money you have for any jobsite saw, lower your expectations and you would be happier with your purchase decision. My neighbor has been a window installer for the last 9 years, running his own business, and has gone through 5 different jobsite brands with his two teams. He has not found anything particularly great or worse. He now buys new jobsite saws according to prices.

    Simon

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