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Thread: sharpening punched saw plate question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    sharpening punched saw plate question

    How different is sharpening a punched plate compared to sharpening one already sharpened? I am pretty new to saw sharpening and would like to make a carcass / tenon saw from tgiag but they don't come pre sharpened. Took a class and have watched videos and practiced on some panel saws I bought just for practicing on.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 06-11-2018 at 4:12 PM. Reason: fixed the title

  2. #2
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    Broadview Heights, OH
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    Steven,

    There is a pretty big difference. On a saw already sharpened, you are removing only a very small amount of metal as the fleam (assuming it's a cross cut) is already established. On a newly cut saw, you first need to shape the teeth as if you are filing a rip saw, then set the saw, they file in the fleam.

    Interesting fact, the angle that teeth are cut is not the same as the file angle which I never understood. It's a few degrees narrower, so the teeth are always taller than they will be in the end. About the only thing that retoothing is good for is giving you regular spaced teeth and a straight toothline (or curved if a breasted saw is your goal).

  3. #3
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    ok, thanks. I'll check with my teacher and see if he takes side jobs, lol

  4. #4
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    actually think I'll just get this veritas set

    http://www.leevalley.com/us/Wood/pag...884,68511&ap=1

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Lee, NC View Post
    actually think I'll just get this veritas set

    http://www.leevalley.com/us/Wood/pag...884,68511&ap=1
    If you said what your goal is in another thread, I missed it. Sorry.

    But for general purpose use and flexibility, I think this:

    Veritas Joinery Saws

    set will be more flexible and cover more uses. (It's also a traditional collection of sizes.)

  6. #6
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    After watching his videos I got both of these books from amazon as used books and want to give some of the projects a try. Currently only have panel saws and a dovetail saw.

    http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/books


    Quote Originally Posted by David Bassett View Post
    If you said what your goal is in another thread, I missed it. Sorry.

    But for general purpose use and flexibility, I think this:

    Veritas Joinery Saws

    set will be more flexible and cover more uses. (It's also a traditional collection of sizes.)

  7. #7
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    Aug 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Lee, NC View Post
    After watching his videos I got both of these books from amazon as used books and want to give some of the projects a try. Currently only have panel saws and a dovetail saw.
    Sorry. I'm not familiar enough with those book's projects to understand why you would need a rip and a cross-cut carcass saw. Your dovetail saw is probably filed rip. (Most people say they can cross-cut with a fine rip saw, so you're covered for both on small pieces.) I assume one of your panel saws is rip and one is cross-cut. Those should cover the bigger stuff adequately. I'm not sure you *NEED* another saw, though perhaps the cross-cut carcass saw would fill in your set a little more. (Of course, in the best tradition around here, if you *WANT* another saw, or more, don't let me stop you!)

    What specific task(s) are you looking to improve with these saw(s)?

  8. #8
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    Oct 2011
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    I thought 22"-24" panel saws would be to unwieldy for mortise/tenon joinery plus the ones I have are low TPI for aggressive cuts. I bring them with me when I buy lumber to fit my truck. And I think the spine of the dovetail saw would prevent me from making some of those cuts deep enough.

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