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Thread: Very old recording time-corrected.

  1. #16
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    Mar 2003
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    What impressed me watching 1911 New York, and 1906 San Francisco back to back, was the change in only 5 years. A lot less horses, and more trucks/cars.

    On the Frisco film, it was interesting to see a couple horse and carriage rigs hurry to get in front of the cable car to ride ON the tracks. The streets were still cobblestone in places at that point in time. I would guess they were locally built at the right width.

    Also interesting was the Chauffeur driven car with a whole family on board, prominently following the cable car. I wonder if that might have been the Mayor?

    I also expected to see a lot of bicycles in New York, but never saw one. Too hilly in SF.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  2. #17
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    Seeing it run at normal speed greatly increases my ability to relate to those people. Here some even older footage and, although the image isn't as sharp, still helps give a feel of being there.
    My apologies to anyone who may have already supplied this link.
    https://youtu.be/qr7kRYO29n4
    Last edited by Bill Jobe; 06-15-2018 at 6:32 PM.

  3. #18
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  4. #19
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    I just noticed the "Shot in 1915" detail.
    But still.....

  5. #20
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    Nov 2011
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    In 2005 I sent all my super8 film to be scanned, digitized, and converted to, 30fps. They did this, if I remember correctly, by duplicating every x number frame so that when played back it was at the correct frame rate and appeared at the correct speed. I don't think they added frames by creating an intermediate frame out of the frame each side of the added frame.

    Then I bought an expensive Adobe suite of tools that included a graphics board that I added to my computer. I edited the digitized film into chapters, dubbed in audio, created menus, and burned DVDs. I also made files that play directly off the hard drive. I had never done this before and only did it one more time but with digital input from a video camera. Higher resolution cameras were just coming out and my equipment does not work at the higher resolution but is good for super8 or non HD video. The equipment and manuals have been boxed up for over 10 years now. It was obsolete soon after I purchased it but is probably ok for the older movies and probably good for scanned slides or photos.

  6. #21
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    Nov 2011
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    Tacoma, WA
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    I just realized that it would be easy enough, with the software I used to digitized edit super8 movies, to duplicate and add frames to correct the speed. When I had the film digitized, the company that did the digitizing, added the frames so I didn't need to do it.

  7. #22
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Excellent visuals, thanks. The mix of the canned audio added was not good to my ears in volume, sync, and realism. For one example, the editor might do well find more than one hoof clop recording and layer them with more appropriate fades.

  8. #23
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    Apr 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Excellent visuals, thanks. The mix of the canned audio added was not good to my ears in volume, sync, and realism. For one example, the editor might do well find more than one hoof clop recording and layer them with more appropriate fades.
    Yes, clearly he/she was focused on image quality with sound being, seemingly, an afterthought.

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