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Thread: Dust collection

  1. #1

    Dust collection

    Exciting stages of moving into a new shop. But first and foremost Iím thinking over dust collection. I have never done anything of the sort. Itís a large space.
    Iím gonna end up getting an Oneida system I believe. But can you all school me on anything else I should be thinking about.
    Like where to buy supplies and all, blast gates, lines. And also what kind is best.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Check local HVAC suppliers and look for sheet metal suppliers before you start looking at the borg or online for duct fittings and blast gates. Then there is the old PVC vs metal argument. Oops, did I spill my preference?
    NOW you tell me...

  3. #3
    Hi Sam,

    Piping as stated is a "metal vs PVC" question. I have a one man shop, 1200sq. ft. and have a 3 hp Grizzly unit that just sucks the stuff up and blows it into a pile behind the shop. Very low tech but very effective for me. I made my own blast gates out of 4" PVC pipe and 1/4" PVC plate. They are bullet proof! The times have changed but the blast gates I've seen are either a. whimpy or b. really expensive or both! I used a simple electrical system with a relay and small switches to control the "unit". When I open a blast gate, unit comes on; close the gate, unit shuts off. It's simple ground wire that runs in series through every switch (blast gate). System has been in place for more than 10 years with NO problems other than my stupidity in plugging it up 3 or 4 times since new.

    The Oneida systems (units) are awesome and I would go that route if doing it over now BUT I have not seen blast gates or operating mechanism that I would prefer (and could afford).

    Best regards,

    Tim

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    I am doing Nordfab metal buying it used. It clamps together. Amazing. I cant afford it new but used in bulk its freeking awesome. I actually have a porch full of spiral but after trying nordfab no way I want to install the spiral way up high.

    Read sandors book on woodshop dust control or the airhandling pdf.

    Airhandling sells spiral too.

  5. #5
    There's a wealth of good information at http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyc...cfm#BottomLine Working through all the tabs and subtopics will keep you busy, inspired and informed.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Columbus Ohio
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    I got most of my fittings from Kencraft. They are good to work with. Don't forget hose clamps like I did. I also go my straight ducting from Grainger. I looked on Amazon warehouse for flex hose. I was able to just get a few things from the big box stores.
    If you go metal, think about using pop rivets to keep the verticle connections together. I actually picked up a bunch of pop rivets at a local auction for just a couple of dollars
    Got more than I will ever use.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Decide whether or not you're going to have the DC unit inside the shop, inside the building in a "closet", or outside the shop. If you have an outside unit and you're just moving the stuff from the machine where it's being generated to outside, then you won't be needing a HEPA filter or the like.

    Decide what you're going to do with what you collect. This ties into the above.

    Power. Make sure you have enough. Keep in mind that when working with any tool that uses the DC, you'll have the DC AND the tool AND any other load in the shop to contend with. You don't want the circuit the beer freezer is on to trip because both the tablesaw and the DC came on at the same time.

    Mobility. The tools can be mobile. The DC can be mobile. Each combination between these two presents its own advantages and drawbacks. Think it through!
    It came to pass...
    "Curiosity is the ultimate power tool." - Roy Underhill
    The road IS the destination.

  8. #8
    Also fun pro tip: You can debur a PVC pipe cut with a handsaw with a sharpened card scraper. It's neanderthal dust collection at it's finest.

  9. #9
    So one thing: just do it. I've never had DC in my shop and now that i'm starting to see myself sneezing and wheezing more I regret that. So jsut get SOMETHING up and alive while you work. even bad DC is better than no DC.

    I am in the middle of laying out some 6" PVC ductwork using "Schedule 20". I got it from my local irrigation/sprinkler store. SO far it's working great, but the 45 degree elbows and wyes really add up fast. I think I'm about 450 in with 40 odd feat of pipe, about 16 45deg elbows and 4 or 5 6x6x6 wyes. So far most of the issues have been a) i can't cut it with a sawzall as it just blows apart and b) getting the supports /suspension right is hard since it's I'm in an exterior two car garage with no real ceiling joists. I have 3 drops currently (tablesaw/planer), bandsaw, mitresaw. With an optional one for a drill press/lathe station later. Since I have no real rafters, It's been hard to mechanically support drops in the middle of the shop since there's no rafter to span easily and there's no drywall ceiling.

    The main ducting installation issue size wise has actually been shrinking down to 4" since there are so many 4" sizes in use, wheres for 6" it's pretty much just schedule 20. The ClearVue acrylic blast gates from amazon work fantastically well with the schedule 20 as does the 6 -> 4x2 splitter with blast gates buitlin.

    For a collector I'm using a repurposed old Delta 1.5HP unit with a wynn filter suspended over a SDD XL (the 6" one) over top of a 55 gallon drum. If I had to do it over again, I'd have just bought the v3000 and been done. More money, WAY less trouble.

    That said, I get about 650 CFM with the filters installed at the main cyclone intake.

  10. #10
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    You should be able to get everything you need directly from Oneida. I bought my entire system, including ducting and all accessories from them. Only a couple smaller plastic fittings had to come from Rockler.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Springer View Post
    I am in the middle of laying out some 6" PVC ductwork using "Schedule 20". I got it from my local irrigation/sprinkler store. SO far it's working great, but the 45 degree elbows and wyes really add up fast. I think I'm about 450 in with 40 odd feat of pipe, about 16 45deg elbows and 4 or 5 6x6x6 wyes. So far most of the issues have been a) i can't cut it with a sawzall as it just blows apart
    I'm not surprised about the sawzall. You should be using a hackzall on PVC pipe, which uses the same blade mounting as a sawzall but saws linearly like a hand-powered hacksaw, rather than doing a full-frontal attack on the material. It's also fairly light and can be used one-handed.
    Last edited by Doug Dawson; 06-12-2018 at 4:46 PM.

  12. image.jpg

    These are actually pretty easy to make if you have a belt sander. They flow better than elbows and are a lot cheaper.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Alexander View Post

    These are actually pretty easy to make if you have a belt sander. They flow better than elbows and are a lot cheaper.
    Brad, I didn't know butt-joints on PVC pipes would hold together long term without using a coupler of some type. What type of glue did you use on these?

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl Loeblein View Post
    Brad, I didn't know butt-joints on PVC pipes would hold together long term without using a coupler of some type. What type of glue did you use on these?
    The solvents used to weld together PVC pipe (and other plastics) actually melt the material together. I would imagine things can be pretty strong.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
    What Brad Alexander did is just way cool! Imagine you could use fiberglass resin and wrap a strip of wet fiberglass around the joint. I used some fiberglass screen and resin to fix a shovel handle, 3 wraps around the handle, and it held.

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